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Topic: Asymmetrical Density

Forum: Waiting for Test Results — Biopsy, mammogram, CAT scan, PET scan, ultrasound, or other tests.

Posted on: Oct 29, 2009 12:28PM

needtotalk wrote:

Hi.   Well, here I am back again.  I was diagnosed with Ductal Carcinoma in my right breast two years ago and I just had my second mammogram since then.  They found an asymmetrical density on my LEFT breast that wasn't there on my last mammo.  I don't know what this is, but I'm sure it's not good.  I have to go for an ultrasound next week.  Can anyone give me any info on this???  Feeling sick all over again.

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Oct 30, 2009 06:29AM rinna40 wrote:

need to talk - sorry can't give you any info, but I thought I'd bump this so others see the topic

Dx 2/23/2009, IDC, 3cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/13 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2-
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Oct 30, 2009 08:15AM Luah wrote:

First, a disclaimer, I'm no expert on this!  However, I did have that term noted on my diagnostic mammogram.  It ended up being the area in which my IDC was eventually found (by ultrasound), but please don't think it is necessarily a bad sign.  I think it just means your breast has a dense area, which the other breast doesn't show, or there are other areas of the same breast that are not similarly dense. If that makes sense.  Sometimes density can hide bad things - sometimes not - or if there is something there, it could be benign too. Try not to worry until you have more information.  Easier said than done, I know. :)

We've been through some things together/With trunks of memories still to come/Long may you run (Neil Young). Lx, ALND, 4 DD AC &12 weekly Taxol, 31 rads, completed Jul 10

Dx 9/14/2009, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIb, Grade 3, 1/14 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2-
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Oct 30, 2009 08:58AM leaf wrote:

I'm  not an expert either, but here's one person's opinion.

"

Asymmetric breast tissue is one of the most difficult mammographic findings to evaluate. The breasts tend to be relatively symmetrical in their distribution of fibroglandular tissue. For this reason, mammograms should be viewed so that the right and left breasts can be compared back-to-back on the viewbox. Minor asymmetries in the distribution of fibroglandular tissue between the two breasts are a common normal variant, but moderate asymmetry may warrant further investigation. Further study of a suspicious asymmetric density should include a correlative clinical breast examination (with careful palpation of the area of concern). Depending on the degree of suspicion, follow-up steps might include additional mammographic views, an ultrasound scan, or 6-month follow-up mammography. When asymmetry is associated with architectural distortion, calcifications, or an underlying mass, the probability of malignancy is greater and a biopsy should be considered.top link"http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=cmed.section.7013

Here's someone else's view:

"Asymmetric Breast Tissue:
Breast tissue is usually very similar from one side to the other. When a greater volume or density of tissue is present on one side, concern arises even if no mass is seen. Although asymmetry does occur as an occasional normal finding, it is important to obtain detailed views, usually with small "focal compression" devices to spread tissues out and exclude a mass. Even if no mass is identified, accelerated follow-up mammogram in 6 months time is usual. If the area can be palpated (felt), biopsy must be considered. Once asymmetry is identified, it tends to remain constant over years, so comparison with previous mammograms can be reassuring in such cases.

Focal Asymmetric Density:
This is an area of breast density (tissue) with similar shape on two views, but completely lacking borders and conspicuity of a true mass. It must be carefully evaluated with special views (usually "focal compression" once again) to exclude finds of a true mass or architectural distortion. If no specific findings are evident, it is managed as asymmetric tissue, comparison to old mammograms if availible, short interval follow-up if not. If special views show mass like character, or if the area can be palpated (felt), biopsy must be considered."http://radiology.creighton.edu/mammo.htm

If you're going through hell, keep going-Winston Churchill

Dx 12/8/2005, LCIS, Stage 0, ER+/PR-Hormonal Therapy 07/15/2006 Tamoxifen
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Oct 30, 2009 01:29PM Luah wrote:

You are such a fountain of knowledge, leaf. Love reading your posts! 

It's interesting to learn that my assymetrical breast density - which the most recent radiologist said had been present for "some time" - was never followed up with clinical exam or 6-mos appointment or ultrasound!  Not til I found the lump myself, that is.  Grrrrrrr.... 

We've been through some things together/With trunks of memories still to come/Long may you run (Neil Young). Lx, ALND, 4 DD AC &12 weekly Taxol, 31 rads, completed Jul 10

Dx 9/14/2009, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIb, Grade 3, 1/14 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2-
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Oct 30, 2009 03:02PM needtotalk wrote:

You guys are great.  Thanks for the info.  I spoke with the nurse today and she said my report said 'Nodular Asymmetrical Density".  Does anyone know what this is all about????

Dx 1/16/2008, IDC, 1cm, Stage I, Grade 1, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-