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Topic: Recommendation on blood pressure cuffs

Forum: Lymphedema — Risks, tips for prevention, and info about products that can address the symptoms of lymphedema.

Posted on: Feb 19, 2010 10:09AM, edited Feb 19, 2010 10:09AM by lvtwoqlt

lvtwoqlt wrote:

Does anyone have a recommendation on blood pressure cuffs to use on the lower extremities? Do the automatic BP monitors work better than the manual ones?

I would like to get a cuff to use at home so I can keep track of my blood pressure not that I have problems with high BP. My dentist's office took my bp the other week when I went in for my cleaning with a regular upper arm automatic cuff on my calf and didn't have any problem. But my doctor's office (in November) tried taking it on my thigh with the larger manual cuff and had trouble hearing the pulse behind my knee. I have my medical spending card that I can use to purchase the cuff.

Sheila

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Feb 19, 2010 11:18AM BoobsinaBox wrote:

I bought the manual cuff after using my husband's automatic cuff, which gets so tight that my leg jumps and my BP goes way up!  I bought a regular arm cuff, which works fine on my calf.  My endocriolgist uses my calf, after I have been lying down for at least 5 minutes, and it comes out the way it used to on my arm in the good old days before cancer.  other docs have had varying success with the thigh cuff.  Automatic definitely does NOT work on me!

Dawn 

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Feb 21, 2010 04:39PM RegulJ wrote:

Also be aware that BP's taken in other locations other than the arm can produce different results from the 120/80 "standard".

Be sure to keep a log so that highs and lows can be identified.

Auto cuffs vs. manual cuffs is a matter of training. Manual cuffs you also have to listen for the sounds and watch the guage.

Dx 8/30/2009, IDC, 5cm, Stage IIb, Grade 3, 3/15 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+
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Feb 21, 2010 09:58PM BoobsinaBox wrote:

My cuff is manually inflated, but the reading is automated (digital).  Thought I should clarify it.

Dawn 

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Feb 22, 2010 06:14AM lvtwoqlt wrote:

Thanks for your input.

RegulJ I am aware that BP taken in the leg can produce different results than arm BP. I wanted to get one so I can keep a log to find out what is 'normal' for me other than what is done at the doctor's offices.

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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Mar 3, 2010 11:05AM lvtwoqlt wrote:

I did purchase the 'Relion' bp automatic machine from Walmart last week http://www.walmart.com/ip/ReliOn-reg-Automatic-Blood-Pressure-Monitor-w-Easy-Wrap-Cuff/4809719  What is the propper placement to put the cuff on the ankle/leg? The one I bought said on the outside that it would expand to large arms but will not fit on my thigh so I am using it on my ankle/calf. I have been putting it high on my calf but I googled ankle BP and several sites say it should be 1 inch from the ankle. When I tried it low on my ankle, I got an error message (incorrect placement) My average over the past several mornings has been 118/75 the way I take it on my calf.

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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Mar 5, 2010 04:55PM Binney4 wrote:

Sheila, I think you're right that the issue here is doing it the same way every time so you get a feel for when it's up or down, as the numbers will not be the same as an arm bp. Somewhere I read it's about 10 points higher than the arm bp on your thigh and 15 points higher on the calf, but that's only an estimate. And a lot depends on whether you're lying flat when you do it, and even on who's doing it. I find thigh bp really "uncomfortable," (more like downright painful). Calf bp is easier, but maybe that's just me. At home I do mine on my calf, not too near the ankle though -- a bit higher up my leg is more even where it doesn't narrow down toward the ankle, and the cuff fits better there. How's it going for you now?

Binney

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Mar 5, 2010 08:53PM lvtwoqlt wrote:

I also find the thigh bp totally uncomfortable (like they are squeezing my leg in half). I had to go to the doctor's office (urgent care not regular dr) this week for sinus and upper respiratory infection. I told the nurse that I couldn't have my bp on my arms due to node removal (I even had my pink wrist bands on). She said that she would take it on my leg and let me in the room. I immediately laid down flat. She took my history then asked where on my leg I usually had it taken. I said that the normal doctor's office had problems hearing the pulse behind my knee but I had been taking it at home on my calf.  When she took it on my calf (higher up on the leg like you said) and it read 120/65 which is close to what I have been getting at the same location laing flat for 10 minutes before taking it. I have been keeping a log of when I take it and what it is just so I can get an idea. My blood pressure pre-bc was average on the arm was 118/65 so it is staying pretty consistant.

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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Mar 6, 2010 10:12AM, edited Mar 6, 2010 10:27AM by kira

Just to understand: do they listen to the artery that runs behind the bump at your ankle, or is it an automatic cuff?

In the leg, the pulses I normally feel for are on the top of the foot--it's variable (dorsalis pedis) and behind the bump at the ankle, the posterior tibial artery.

Feeling for the popliteal artery--behind the knee, is tough. 

Kira 

Knowledge is the antidote to fear, Ralph Waldo Emerson

Dx 5/10/2008, IDC, 1cm, Stage Ib, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Mar 6, 2010 11:20AM Binney4 wrote:

Kira, thank you for that! I've had them do it on my thigh and use the popliteal artery (which at the time I didn't have a name for). Like you, Sheila, it feels like my leg is coming apart.Surprised Makes me very panicky.Embarassed I'm pretty firm now about telling them to use the calf. My cardiologist uses the top of my foot, and he doesn't pump the dumb thing very high and -- surprise! -- he gets lower readings than everyone else. Could be because I'm not ready to shriek with pain and panic. Then again, it could also be because I haven't just spent the last ten minutes explaining why they have to use my leg and how they should do it. One time I went in there and the nurse did it on my leg before he came it -- it was sky high. When he came in I said, "My blood pressure is really high!"

He's a very calm man, fortunately. He said, "That's because she didn't know what she was doing." He brought her back in and showed her how, and it was way lower. Gotta be real careful with this, because if they don't know what they're doing they may do it anyway.Undecided If they get a really high reading now I say (as matter-of-factly as possible) "Have you ever done a leg bp before?" If they say yes I say, "How long ago was that?" Laughing

When it's just a routine exam I don't mind having to teach them how to do this, but last year in the ER when they couldn't find anybody who knew how to do it I was, uh, upset. Wish I had a small laminated card with pictures like Kira posted and instructions for the uninitiated. Man, would that ever make my life easier!

Ah, these "teaching moments"!Tongue out
Binney

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Mar 6, 2010 04:24PM lvtwoqlt wrote:

 Binney or Kira if you come up with a laminated card or a pdf we could print out and laminate ourselves with instructions on how to do a leg BP I would love to have one to carry around also. It would make our lives easier.

I put my automatic cuff on my leg with the mark for the artery on the inside of my leg at the house. At the urgent care this week she listened to the pulse on the top of my foot (I think), I was surprised I didn't have to make a scene to get her to take it on my leg that I didn't pay much attention.

Sheila

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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Mar 7, 2010 09:34AM, edited Mar 7, 2010 09:51AM by kira

Sheila, it's a great idea, and we're working on it--so far this is the best reference I found:

http://classic.aacn.org/AACN/practiceAlert.nsf/Files/NBP/$file/Noninvasive%20BP%20Monitoring%206-2006.pdf 

• Calf BP measurement is also referred to as an ankle BP. If a stethoscope is used, Korotkoff's sounds are auscultated over either the doralis pedis or posterior tibial artery (for calf BP) or the popliteal artery (for thigh BP). Results of comparisons of automatic, noninvasive upper arm and calf BPs in adults vary. Overall systolic BP measurements were higher in the calf than the arm in patients undergoing surgery, colonoscopy, and caesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia.20-22 (Level V) Differences in mean BP and diastolic BP were not consistent. Large differences for some individuals make it difficult to devise a predictive formula that would be applicable in all situations.21 In adults, calf BPs should be used only if the upper arm is not accessible20 or if the appropriate size cuff is not available.
• Multiple reasons exist why an extremity may not be suitable for BP measurement. BP cuffs should not be used on an extremity with a deep vein thrombosis, grafts, ischemic changes, arteriovenous fistula, or arteriovenous graft.23-25 BP cuffs should not be applied over a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) or midline catheter site but may be placed distally to the insertion site.23 BP measurements should not be taken in extremities with peripheral IV while an infusion is running26 or any trauma/incision. For patients who have had a mastectomy or lumpectomy, do not use the involved arm(s) for BPs if there is lymphedema.13,27 (Level II) 

Sheila, here's a decent one, no pictures though:

www.ehow.com/how_4867029_corre... TO
How to Take Correct Blood Pressure Reading in the Calf Muscles

Contributor
By Katrina Josey
eHow Contributing Writer
Article Rating: (1 Ratings)
Clinicians sometimes measure blood pressure in the calf for comparison with a reading from another part of the body in patients with certain medical conditions. While it is possible to measure the blood pressure in the calf, this should only be done if the pressure can't be measured in the arm. Some reasons to avoid reading the blood pressure in the calf include swelling from lymphedema or the presence of blood clots. Still, if the person is large or there isn't an appropriate size of cuff available, measuring in the calf is best.

Difficulty: Moderately Easy
Instructions
Things You'll Need:
Blood pressure cuff/sphygmomanometer
Stethoscope
Step
1
Instruct the person whose pressure is being measured to lie flat on his or her back and remain silent. Speaking while having the blood pressure measured can cause a false reading that is higher than normal.
Step
2
Bend the knee of the leg the pressure will be measured in. Allow the foot to remain flat.
Step
3
Strap the blood pressure cuff around the leg. The bottom of the cuff should stop about 1 inch above the ankle. Make sure the inflatable portion of the cuff is big enough to go around 80 percent of the leg to avoid a false high or low reading.
Step
4
Place the stethoscope on the dorsalis pedis artery. It can located by placing the finger halfway between the inner ankle bone and the Achilles tendon. Feel for the pulse there before proceeding to make sure the Korotkoff sounds can be heard there. Keep in mind that in about 2 to 3 percent of healthy people, the sound can't be heard in one or both legs.

Step
5
Turn the dial on the cuff to make sure no air can escape and pump it up with air past 180mm/Hg (millimeters mercury). Slowly release the air and listen for the first Korotkoff sound. Note this reading on the cuff as it will be recorded as the systolic pressure (top number). Listen for the when the sound dies off completely and record this number as the diastolic pressure (bottom number).

They say that this article is associated with the Lance Armstrong Foundation, so maybe that's a good place to search--the article can be printed without ads. The place that they tell you to palpate the artery is the posterior tibial, not the dorsalis pedis, which is on the top of the foot.

Here's a wikepidia reference to how to palpate the dorsalis pedis pulse, which is not present in 2-3% of people

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorsalis_pedis_artery 

We're closing in on it--this was almost perfect, except for the wrong pulse. Nothing on the Lance Armstrong site, except to say thigh blood pressures in the LE handout. 

Kira 

Knowledge is the antidote to fear, Ralph Waldo Emerson

Dx 5/10/2008, IDC, 1cm, Stage Ib, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Apr 29, 2010 09:28AM lvtwoqlt wrote:

I am going back to my pcp tomorrow, I am going prepared with the printout from ehow and the critical-care nurse alert with appropriate lines highlighted, the picture of the arteries of the lower limb, and my personal bp cuff with my log of taking my bp on my calf.

Thanks Kira, by the way did you notice in the ehow article in the list of reasons to avoid reading the bp in the calf include LE? why can't they get that straight on the arms as well? The critical care nurse paper also states to not use the involved arms for PB on patients who have mast or lumpectomy (although level 2 - theory based with no research data to support recommendations Frown)

Sheila

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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Apr 29, 2010 12:09PM otter wrote:

Unfortunately, the critical care nursing paper actually said this: 

"For patients who have had a mastectomy or lumpectomy, do not use the
involved arm(s) for BPs if there is lymphedema.13,27 (Level II)"  [Italics are mine.]

So, they're not telling healthcare workers to avoid taking BP in an at-risk arm -- only an arm that already has LE.  And, if our healthcare workers think the only clinically important LE is LE that looks like those grotesquely swollen arms and legs shown in pics in books about LE, they'll never take our concerns about at-risk arms or even "Stage 0" swelling seriously.  <sigh>

OTOH, Reference #27 cited for the statement in the critical care nursing paper is an ACS on-line article about LE:  http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/content/CRI_2_6X_Lymphedema_5.asp

Here's the relevant statement from the ACS article:

"Constriction or squeezing of the arm may increase the pressure in nearby blood vessels, which may lead to increased fluid and swelling. Some women have linked this with the start of lymphedema. Lymphedema has also been linked with air travel, possibly because of the low cabin pressure. Tips include:  …[I am skipping some items] ...   Have your blood pressure taken on the unaffected arm or, if both arms are affected, on your thigh."

Too bad that's also anecdotal (Level II).

otter

Dx IDC, Stage I, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Apr 30, 2010 11:30AM lvtwoqlt wrote:

Well, I went to my pcp this morning, left the print-outs on my desk last night and forgot my automatic bp cuff. The nurse looked at me strange when I refused to get my bp taken on my arms. She was receptive to learn how to take it on my calf. She asked where they listened to the beat. I told her either the front of the foot or the side of the ankle. It took her 2 tries but she managed to get a decent reading, considering I wasn't laying down for 5 minutes.

Sheila

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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Apr 30, 2010 11:38AM 3jaysmom wrote:

here's a new twist..i know this is an "old" thread.. what do you think binney, u seem 2 know alot about LE.. my therapist said i could use a wrist cuff.. it was low enough not to cause any problems.my cardio agreed. i do have hi b.p.. so take it often,just calibrated it 2 cardios bp...i cant do leg; that's where my m.s.effects me the worst..light and love,   3jaysmom

3jaysmom

Dx DCIS, 2cm, Stage IIb, 1/27 nodes, ER-/PR+, HER2-Chemotherapy 04/21/2009
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Apr 30, 2010 08:11PM LindaLou53 wrote:

3jaysmom, I have been using a wrist BP cuff on my at risk arm for 5 years now.  Applying sustained pressure to an at risk limb is not without risk, but in your case it may be the lesser risk compared to using your legs since you have a known problem with M.S.

Since you already have a problem with hypertension, it is important that you monitor your BP in a consistent manner to develop an accurate trend that is reliable for properly regulating your medication.  If you have had surgery and nodes removed on only one side, just make sure you use the non-surgery arm for your BP readings.  If you are at risk on both sides and cannot use your legs for BP, try using the wrist on the arm with the least amount of surgery or nodes removed.  Only take your wrist BP when necessary and try to avoid repeating the BP immediately after the initial  reading. Give your wrist a rest, elevate your arm and wait at least 5-10minutes if you feel you need to double-check the BP reading.

Having other medical conditions and complications just makes it more difficult to navigate the path to maintain our best health.  Compromises have to be made at times.  All you can do is try to determine what presents the lesser risk for you.

Life is not measured by how many breaths we take...but by the moments that take our breath away! ...I am a 14/8 yr survivor of 2 Primary BCs, 23/23 Positive Nodes (Zometa x 5 years) Started Paloma-3 Clinical Trial 4-14-14

Dx 7/14/2000, IDC, 1cm, Stage IIa, Grade 1, 2/7 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-Dx 11/21/2005, ILC, 5cm, Stage IIIc, Grade 1, 23/23 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-Dx 3/21/2014, ILC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2-Surgery 08/11/2000 Lumpectomy (Right); Lymph Node Removal: Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection (Right)Chemotherapy 08/30/2000 Adriamycin, Cytoxan, TaxolRadiation Therapy 02/26/2001 ExternalHormonal Therapy 05/10/2001 TamoxifenSurgery 12/05/2005 Mastectomy (Both); Lymph Node Removal: Axillary Lymph Node Dissection (Left)Chemotherapy 12/23/2005 Taxotere, XelodaRadiation Therapy 04/07/2006 ExternalHormonal Therapy 04/07/2006 AromasinHormonal Therapy 04/14/2014 Faslodex
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May 14, 2010 11:12AM lvtwoqlt wrote:

Another update from me. I had to see a new GYN yesterday because of abnormal pap tests (6 months apart). I made sure that I took my cuff with me and as the nurse set me down after weighing me, I immediately told her that she would have to take my BP on my leg. she looked at the questionaire that I filled out and said that she had the area highlited where I put bilat mast and was going to ask me about that. She didn't question my leg BP request and took me into the exam room to do the BP. I showed her my BP cuff and told her of the reluctance of other offices to take it on my leg so I carry my own cuff to show how I take it myself. She liked my initative on keeping up with my health issues. Now to see if that strategy works at my pcp office.

Sheila

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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May 14, 2010 05:04PM o2bhealthy wrote:

Awesome Sheila!!!  I still have not had the gumption to make a big fuss yet about using the leg, my left arm just started to swell so I had been allowing BP's on that arm in the past.  I am gonna have to grow some ____ and learn how to stand up for myself with the doc's

Michelle ~ DCIS and IDC - Thyroid Cancer dx 10-27-10, partial thyroidectomy 11-23-10

Dx 5/15/2009, IDC, 1cm, Stage I, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2+Surgery 06/23/2009 Mastectomy (Both); Reconstruction: Tissue expander placement (Both)Chemotherapy 07/19/2009 Cytoxan, TaxotereTargeted Therapy 07/19/2009 HerceptinSurgery 11/12/2009 Reconstruction: Breast implants (permanent) (Both)Hormonal Therapy 12/01/2009 Tamoxifen
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May 14, 2010 07:48PM lvtwoqlt wrote:

Michelle it has taken me 3 yrs to get my ba__s and stand up for myself. Last November when I was seeing a new dr, he tried to take my bp on my thigh and couldn't hear the pulse behind my knee (I thought he was going to cut my leg in two with the pressure on the cuff) and he said that it was ok on my arm. I let him take the bp on my un-swelled arm that had 4 nodes removed, but have since grown some ba__s and gotten help from these swell ladies and speak up for myself.

Sheila

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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May 26, 2010 02:55PM Sher wrote:

Well, to add to my other issues, my systolic blood pressure is now elevated - actually has been for several months, but I've been avoiding meds.  I always insist on ankle pressure readings and the systolic is anywhere from 145 to 155 taken at home with my own automatic Omron monitor and can be slightly higher in the doctors office.  Diastolic pressure is always in the 60's.   I know ankle readings can be higher than arms, but the only way I'll know for sure if I truly have high blood pressure is to try it on my arm and so would prefer to use a wrist cuff monitor rather than the usual upper arm cuff.  Does anyone have a preference or recommendation for a good one? 

Dx 8/28/2000, IDC, <1cm, Stage 1b, Grade 2, 0/14 nodes, ER/PR+, HER2 Dx 6/16/2008 Local Recurrence, IDC, <1cm, Stage 1b, Grade 3, ER/PR-, HER2-

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Aug 12, 2010 12:54PM LindaLou53 wrote:

Sorry I missed this one Sher.  I use the OMRON HEM-670 IT wrist BP cuff with positional sensor.

BUMP for Kcshreve

Life is not measured by how many breaths we take...but by the moments that take our breath away! ...I am a 14/8 yr survivor of 2 Primary BCs, 23/23 Positive Nodes (Zometa x 5 years) Started Paloma-3 Clinical Trial 4-14-14

Dx 7/14/2000, IDC, 1cm, Stage IIa, Grade 1, 2/7 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-Dx 11/21/2005, ILC, 5cm, Stage IIIc, Grade 1, 23/23 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-Dx 3/21/2014, ILC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2-Surgery 08/11/2000 Lumpectomy (Right); Lymph Node Removal: Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection (Right)Chemotherapy 08/30/2000 Adriamycin, Cytoxan, TaxolRadiation Therapy 02/26/2001 ExternalHormonal Therapy 05/10/2001 TamoxifenSurgery 12/05/2005 Mastectomy (Both); Lymph Node Removal: Axillary Lymph Node Dissection (Left)Chemotherapy 12/23/2005 Taxotere, XelodaRadiation Therapy 04/07/2006 ExternalHormonal Therapy 04/07/2006 AromasinHormonal Therapy 04/14/2014 Faslodex
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Aug 12, 2010 11:29PM Sher wrote:

Thanks LindaLou!  I actually just got around to ordering one last week - an Omron with positional sensor.  I think it was the HEM 670, but when I just went to Amazon to check out the purchase, found the order never went through for some reason.  Wondered why it was taking so long getting here!   I just read your other post about the monitor that connects to a computer for graphs, print outs, etc and since I have to order again, will check into that one.  Thanks again!  

Dx 8/28/2000, IDC, <1cm, Stage 1b, Grade 2, 0/14 nodes, ER/PR+, HER2 Dx 6/16/2008 Local Recurrence, IDC, <1cm, Stage 1b, Grade 3, ER/PR-, HER2-

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Sep 24, 2010 07:42PM, edited Aug 20, 2013 05:48AM by lvtwoqlt

bump for Paula

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)
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Sep 27, 2010 03:48PM lvtwoqlt wrote:

bumping again for paula.

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006

Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodesSurgery 02/12/2005 Lumpectomy (Left)Surgery 09/10/2006 Lumpectomy (Right)Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 TamoxifenSurgery 06/01/2007 Mastectomy (Both)