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Topic: What is PASH?

Forum: Not Diagnosed but Worried — Meet others worried about developing breast cancer for the first time.

Posted on: May 23, 2010 03:13PM, edited May 24, 2010 10:03PM by Meaghan

Meaghan wrote:

I was recently diagnosed and have done a lot of research on PASH, but everything I have found is in clinical terms.  Not being a medical professional, I have no idea what it all means.  I'm looking for a description in layman terms, such as "the fibrocystic cells in the breast grow to abnormal size and reproduce rapidly".  Obviously that's just an example, but I need something that I can understand and say when I explain PASH to my family.  Does anyone know themselves or have a website that I can refer to?

EDIT:  All I can tell you is what PASH stands for... Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia.  Other than that, I only know that it is a normally benign growth that is frequently a microscopic incidental finding in breast biopsies performed for benign or malignant disease.  Mine, however, is not so microscopic nor incidental.  This one is 2.5 x 1.5 cm.

EDIT 2:  I have already visited not only the site that the gave the definition but also the all of the sites listed in the last answer.  I just don't understand what most of what I'm reading means.  That said, I do thank both of you for your efforts.  I wish there was an online layman-worded dictionary of medical conditions that was easy to navigate.  I've found a couple of online medical dictionaries, but the definitions are just as difficult to understand as the term I'm looking up - lol!  Thanks again!

EDIT:  Thank you for the all of the explanations.  It seems to make more sense now.

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May 23, 2010 04:15PM barbe1958 wrote:

I have no idea what PASH is. You say you did a lot of research on it, so what is it? I tried Googling it and got nothing.

Religion is for people who are afraid of hell, spirituality is for people who have already been there. (Lakota Nation)

Dx 12/10/2008
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May 23, 2010 04:54PM RebzAmy wrote:

Hi Meaghan

I just googled it for you and got the following:

Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a type of benign breast lesion that occurs as a single palpable mass or a dense region on a mammogram

The masses observed in individuals with PASH are benign (non-cancerous) and require diagnosis only to distinguish them from cancerous (malignant) lesions.  It may be mistaken for angiosarcoma; however, the breast lesions caused by angiosarcoma are different than those seen in PASH

The size of PASH lesions range from incidental microscopic findings to breast masses that are palpable or evident on a mammogram. Masses are usually large (5-6 cm in diameter), with reported diameters ranging from 1 to 12 cm.  The masses may grow over time

PASH most commonly affects premenopausal women. The age range of people diagnosed with PASH is 14-67 years; however, most individuals are diagnosed in their late thirties or forties

Surgical removal of the PASH lesions has been performed in some individuals.  A wide margin around the mass may be removed to prevent recurrence. Although PASH lesions often grow over time and may recur, they are neither associated with malignancy (cancer) nor considered to be premalignant (pre-cancerous).[1]  According to the medical text, CONN's Current Therapy 2007, approximately 7 percent of people experience a recurrence of PASH.[2]

Diagnosed June 2007, IDC, Grade 3, 4-5cm lump, several lymph nodes involved, HER2+++, 4 months of high strength chemo, mastectomy and lymph node removal, radiotherapy & a year of herceptin and recently had preventative surgery to other breast.

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May 23, 2010 04:58PM mnmom wrote:

I do not know but found these 4 one is a google scholar site

there are alot of online sites on this....sorry I could not help out

http://radiographics.rsna.org/content/19/4/1086.full

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoangiomatous_stromal_hyperplasia

http://www.nature.com/modpathol/journal/v21/n2/full/3801003a.html

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=Pseudoangiomatous+stromal+hyperplasia.&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart

Dx 11/2008
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May 23, 2010 07:13PM barbe1958 wrote:

Wow, you guys did good! My Google search said "Did you mean POSH?

Religion is for people who are afraid of hell, spirituality is for people who have already been there. (Lakota Nation)

Dx 12/10/2008
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May 24, 2010 11:33AM, edited May 24, 2010 11:36AM by alligans

Well, PASH could be 2 different things.  Originally PASH was found in my fibroadenoma pathology but it was later removed when my slides were looked over by another pathologist.

In my case the PASH was listed as focal which means very small amount.  This is a common incidental finding in biopsies and doesn't really mean much of anything.  Just another type of hyperplasia and is benign.

 However, there are rare instances when the PASH makes up the whole tumor.  This is very rare although it does happen.  Again, it's benign as long as the pathologist knows his stuff.  Like another poster mentioned, it can be mistaken for angiosarcoma which is a very aggressive but rare type of cancer.  It differs from most breast cancers which are carcinomas.  I think in this instance the most important thing is making sure that it's not an angiosarcoma because pathologically the two can be mistaken for each other. 

In layman's terms, pseudo means that it looks like one thing but it actually isn't it.  In this case, it means that it looks like angiosarcoma but it isn't and it isn't malignant.  My layman's wording may make this sound malignant but it's not as long as the pathology is correct.  You may want to get the slides checked over by another pathologist (at a breast cancer center) just to be sure since this is a pretty rare thing (having it as a whole tumor rather than just an incidental finding).