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Topic: Prunes for bone density-anyone have success?

Forum: Bone Health and Bone Loss —

Talk with others about bone density, osteopenia and osteoporosis, and ways to keep your bones strong

Posted on: Nov 10, 2013 02:21AM

aussieched wrote:

Hello, I have read various articles that eating 8 prunes a day helps improve bone density. Has anyone had success eating prunes and improving their bone density while taking an aromatase inhibitor or tamoxifen?

thanks Ched

Dx 5/11/2007, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 1, 1/30 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 5/30/2007 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Left, Underarm/Axillary; Prophylactic ovary removal Radiation Therapy 8/16/2007 Hormonal Therapy 9/28/2007 Femara (letrozole)
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Nov 10, 2013 08:25AM doxie wrote:

Search for Ruthbru and look on the Hormone Therapy forum and you'll find hundreds of comments about this. Many claim it has helped them. I've kept my bone density stable for over a year through pounding exercise, weight lifting, diet, Calcium, and 2,000-4,000 mg Vit D. Would have added prunes but I never remember to pick them up at the grocery store.

Dx 8/2011, IDC, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/7 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/1/2011 Lumpectomy: Right Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel)
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Nov 10, 2013 11:48AM corky60 wrote:

My understanding is that it is the boron in prunes that helps bone density. I belong to an osteoporosis forum where this was discussed. Also the quantity of prunes needed was said to be 100 grams per day. Per a bag of prunes each serving of 5 weighs 40 grams so you would need to eat 12-13 prunes per day. I am sorry I can't find the link in the other site but I'm sure you can search it.

Dx 3/25/2013, IDC, Right, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 4/25/2013 Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Right Radiation Therapy 5/28/2013 Breast
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Nov 10, 2013 02:49PM aussieched wrote:

To Doxie & Corky, thanks for your response ladies.

ched

Dx 5/11/2007, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 1, 1/30 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 5/30/2007 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Left, Underarm/Axillary; Prophylactic ovary removal Radiation Therapy 8/16/2007 Hormonal Therapy 9/28/2007 Femara (letrozole)
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Nov 11, 2013 07:12AM corky60 wrote:

You're welcome, aussieched.

Dx 3/25/2013, IDC, Right, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 4/25/2013 Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Right Radiation Therapy 5/28/2013 Breast
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Nov 11, 2013 08:54PM ruthbru wrote:

I ate a serving of prunes a day during my 5 years of Arimidex & my bones stayed in the normal range. I also did weigh bearing exercises, got in the dairy, so I can't be sure what exactly did the trick....also could just be good genes or good luck....but, prunes have been shown to actually BUILD bones, so it can't hurt to take them. They also are good for colon health. I continue, and will continue, to eat them daily forever!

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Nov 11, 2013 11:48PM Blessings2011 wrote:

Oh, ruthbru - the minute I saw this topic I thought of you!!!

One concern I have about prune therapy is the OTHER side effect of prunes... you know, when you take them for constipation?

Did they have that effect on you at all?

I don't want to end up in the bathroom all day....

You mentioned "colon health".... I call it The Big "D" Scared

Dx 9/15/2011, IDC, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 12/4/2011 Lymph node removal: Left; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Surgery 8/21/2012 Reconstruction (left); Reconstruction (right) Hormonal Therapy 9/4/2012 Arimidex (anastrozole) Hormonal Therapy 10/21/2013 Femara (letrozole)
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Nov 12, 2013 12:44AM ruthbru wrote:

I have a pretty iron cast stomach. If you are more 'delicate', start with a few and work up or spread them up throughout the day. The reason they are good for colon health is that they do keep all the wastes keeping moving quickly to the exit! My GP says that if everyone ate a serving of prunes a day, there would be many fewer cases of colon cancer.

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Nov 25, 2014 09:23PM glennie19 wrote:

https://www.fsu.edu/indexTOFStory.html?lead.plums

Ruth:  have you seen this?   I thought of you when I saw it!  I'm eating my prunes!

Fibromyalgia and Truncal Lymphedema,,, some of the fun things I live with. Total hysterecomy 9/29/14 Prophy MX Righty 11/30/17 Dx 6/27/2013, Paget's, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 8/7/2013 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left Dx DCIS
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Nov 26, 2014 02:59PM new_direction wrote:

maybe vegetables are even better than anything else

http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2007/05_may/02/gladiator.shtml

'The Gladiator grave at Ephesus contained the intermingled bones of 68 corpses – nearly all young men under 30 – totalling over 2,000 bones, with a further 5,000 fragments. ... Franz and Grosschmidt used a spectrometer to establish the amount of strontium in Euxenius's bones.  Levels of strontium indicate the amount of vegetable matter consumed over a lifetime, the higher the levels the more likely that the diet is devoid of meat.  The pair thought that strontium levels would be lower in Gladiators, as they would need a protein rich diet in order to build muscle tissue. ... What they found in Euxenius, and other unnamed Gladiator corpses, was to astound them.  The results proved that Gladiators in fact had an almost completely vegetarian diet.  They probably ate a diet of barley and beans washed down with a vinegar/ash drink – the forerunner of sports drinks. 

"The Romans may have known more about the human body than we ever thought possible," says Dr Kanz. 

"Today in osteoporosis research a lot of work is being done to see if administering strontium instead of calcium will build strong bones.  It has been found that if strontium is administered, the healing process takes place faster and the bones become more stable.

"Higher levels of strontium could have meant that Gladiators were less likely to receive crippling injuries and wounds."


 

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Nov 26, 2014 11:28PM ruthbru wrote:

Just ate my daily serving of prunes a few minutes ago. Always nice when advice I give is actually true! Happy

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Dec 5, 2014 11:12AM glennie19 wrote:

I am printing that to take to my GYN. She was quite surprised when I told her about prunes. I think she should spread the word to all her patients, esp. post-menopausal.

Fibromyalgia and Truncal Lymphedema,,, some of the fun things I live with. Total hysterecomy 9/29/14 Prophy MX Righty 11/30/17 Dx 6/27/2013, Paget's, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 8/7/2013 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left Dx DCIS
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Dec 5, 2014 11:32AM Bounce wrote:

How many prunes in a serving Ruthbru? Sounds like a good idea to try them. I have stopped eating dairy products and the dietician nearly had a heart attack! She seemed to think after a few years of such a diet I will have wrecked my bones.

Dx 8/5/2013, IDC, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/2 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/1/2013 Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Right, Sentinel Radiation Therapy 11/4/2013 Breast Hormonal Therapy 1/1/2014 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Dec 5, 2014 02:11PM ruthbru wrote:

Read on the side of the box what a serving is. Usually it is 5 to 7 prunes. When I told my doctor what I was doing, he commented that besides the bones, if everyone ate a serving  of prunes a day, there would be very few cases of colon cancer. So it seems like a win/win thing to try

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Dec 5, 2014 07:02PM labelle wrote:

It does seem like a win/win thing and I like prunes (dried plums because they sound better) well enough so I'll add them to my grocery list. Do any other dried fruits do this? I like dates, figs and dried apricots even more! LOL.

Dx 9/29/2014, IDC: Tubular, Left, <1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 1, 1/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 11/12/2014 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 25, 2016 01:40PM wallycat wrote:

I am reading that boron increases estrogen levels. Has anyone been testing their levels after introducing prunes?

Thanks all...wish they were lower carb

Sad

Dx 4/07 1 month before turning 50; ILC 1.8cm, ER+/PR+, HER2 neg., Stage 1, Grade 2, 0/5 nodes. Onco score 20, Bilateral Mast., tamoxifen 3-1/2 years, arimidex-completed 4/20/2012
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Feb 27, 2016 06:41PM wallycat wrote:

Here is a great article on bone health and prunes:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/307035.ph...



Dx 4/07 1 month before turning 50; ILC 1.8cm, ER+/PR+, HER2 neg., Stage 1, Grade 2, 0/5 nodes. Onco score 20, Bilateral Mast., tamoxifen 3-1/2 years, arimidex-completed 4/20/2012
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Mar 1, 2016 04:07PM ruthbru wrote:

It is a win/win food! I've been kind of lax since I've been done with arimidex, but need to get back on the prune regiminin.

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Mar 1, 2016 04:13PM ChiSandy wrote:

The only true downside to prunes is their high sugar content (as with all dried fruit). But you can counteract that by cutting back as far as possible on other sources of sugar (including simple starches). Also, of all the dried fruits, they also have the highest amounts of soluble fiber. And Dr. Bob (my cardiologist hubby) says that soluble fiber is one of the heart-healthiest nutrients you can consume, because it lowers LDL and thus total cholesterol. 6 prunes a day keeps the statins away?

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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Mar 1, 2016 04:46PM ruthbru wrote:

Love it!

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Mar 1, 2016 07:55PM exercise_guru wrote:

ChiSandy

Thank you for posting about this. They took my cholesterol post chemo and it is 270? I have three months to try to correct it. My HDL is fine my LDL is high as are my triglicerites defenitly will do 6 prunes a day.

Age 42 05/15/2015 PALB2 mutation, DBL Breast Cancer Type 1A Grade 3 ER+PR+(right 1.3cm,.5cm) HERr+(left1.6 cm), 06/26/2015 BMX with TE 8/27/15 Chemotherapy TCH 12/30/2015 TAH/BSO/Reconstruction 1/29/16 Arimidex 3/1/16 Femara 5/6/16 Tamoxifen
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Mar 1, 2016 08:32PM LindaE54 wrote:

Ruthbru - Can't remember when you posted the virtues of dried prunes, but have been eating my 6 prunes every day since I read your post. Must be over a year or so ago.

Linda - dx at 54. Decision to stop all treatments on 9 Jan 2018 Dx 11/26/2013, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver/other, Grade 3, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Radiation Therapy 12/19/2013 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 12/30/2013 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy 5/28/2014 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy 5/29/2014 External: Bone Radiation Therapy 8/28/2014 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 9/25/2014 Femara (letrozole) Radiation Therapy 12/14/2014 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 2/17/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Chemotherapy 5/15/2017 Taxol (paclitaxel) Radiation Therapy 6/5/2017 External: Bone Chemotherapy 10/3/2017 Ellence (epirubicin) Chemotherapy 10/22/2017 CEF Chemotherapy 12/27/2017 Halaven (eribulin)
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Mar 1, 2016 08:59PM ruthbru wrote:

I found it (May 2015):

When it comes to improving bone health in postmenopausal women — and people of all ages, actually — a Florida State University researcher has found a simple, proactive solution to help prevent fractures and osteoporosis: eating dried plums.

"Over my career, I have tested numerous fruits, including figs, dates, strawberries and raisins, and none of them come anywhere close to having the effect on bone density that dried plums, or prunes, have," said Bahram H. Arjmandi, Florida State's Margaret A. Sitton Professor and chairman of the Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences in the College of Human Sciences. "All fruits and vegetables have a positive effect on nutrition, but in terms of bone health, this particular food is exceptional."

Arjmandi and a group of researchers from Florida State and Oklahoma State University tested two groups of postmenopausal women. Over a 12-month period, the first group, consisting of 55 women, was instructed to consume 100 grams of dried plums (about 10 prunes) each day, while the second — a comparative control group of 45 women — was told to consume 100 grams of dried apples. All of the study's participants also received daily doses of calcium (500 milligrams) and vitamin D (400 international units).

The group that consumed dried plums had significantly higher bone mineral density in the ulna (one of two long bones in the forearm) and spine, in comparison with the group that ate dried apples. This, according to Arjmandi, was due in part to the ability of dried plums to suppress the rate of bone resorption, or the breakdown of bone, which tends to exceed the rate of new bone growth as people age.

The group's research, "Comparative Effects of Dried Plum and Dried Apple on Bone in Post Menopausal Women," was published in the British Journal of Nutrition. Arjmandi conducted the research with his graduate students Shirin Hooshmand, Sheau C. Chai and Raz L. Saadat of the College of Human Sciences; Dr. Kenneth Brummel-Smith, Florida State's Charlotte Edwards Maguire Professor and chairman of the Department of Geriatrics in the College of Medicine; and Oklahoma State University statistics Professor Mark E. Payton.

In the United States, about 8 million women have osteoporosis because of the sudden cessation of ovarian hormone production at the onset of menopause. What's more, about 2 million men also have osteoporosis.

"In the first five to seven postmenopausal years, women are at risk of losing bone at a rate of 3 to 5 percent per year," Arjmandi said. "However, osteoporosis is not exclusive to women and, indeed, around the age of 65, men start losing bone with the same rapidity as women."

Arjmandi encourages people who are interested in maintaining or improving their bone health to take note of the extraordinarily positive effect that dried plums have on bone density.

"Don't wait until you get a fracture or you are diagnosed with osteoporosis and have to have prescribed medicine," Arjmandi said. "Do something meaningful and practical beforehand. People could start eating two to three dried plums per day and increase gradually to perhaps six to 10 per day. Prunes can be eaten in all forms and can be included in a variety of recipes."

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Mar 2, 2016 09:54AM LindaE54 wrote:

Thank you Ruth!

Linda - dx at 54. Decision to stop all treatments on 9 Jan 2018 Dx 11/26/2013, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver/other, Grade 3, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Radiation Therapy 12/19/2013 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 12/30/2013 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy 5/28/2014 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy 5/29/2014 External: Bone Radiation Therapy 8/28/2014 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 9/25/2014 Femara (letrozole) Radiation Therapy 12/14/2014 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 2/17/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Chemotherapy 5/15/2017 Taxol (paclitaxel) Radiation Therapy 6/5/2017 External: Bone Chemotherapy 10/3/2017 Ellence (epirubicin) Chemotherapy 10/22/2017 CEF Chemotherapy 12/27/2017 Halaven (eribulin)
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Apr 3, 2016 09:12PM peepgirl wrote:

I wasn't sure from reading the above - can adding prunes to your diet help with bone density if you already have osteoporosis ? I'm afraid chemo, radiation and Femara are taking a toll on my middle aged bones.

This is the day that the Lord has made, we will rejoice and be glad in it! Dx 5/21/2012, IDC, 3cm, Grade 3, 2/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Apr 4, 2016 09:09AM ruthbru wrote:

Prunes can actually build bones.

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Apr 9, 2016 01:35PM KeepMoving wrote:

Anastrazole has decreased my bone density. I will give the prunes a try. Thank you so much for this info.

Dx 5/7/2012, IDC, 4cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, 1/10 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 6/10/2012 AC + T (Taxol) Surgery 11/13/2012 Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Right, Underarm/Axillary Hormonal Therapy 11/30/2012 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 12/18/2012 Breast
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May 7, 2018 01:35PM ruthbru wrote:

Bump

"Invisible threads are the strongest ties." Friedrich Nietzsche Dx 2/2007, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/11 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-

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