We are 206,156 members in 81 forums discussing 148,998 topics.

Help with Abbreviations

All TopicsForum: Alternative Medicine → Topic: " alcohol "

Topic: " alcohol "

Forum: Alternative Medicine —

This forum is a safe, judgement-free place to discuss Alternative medicine. Alternative medicine refers to treatments that are used INSTEAD of standard, evidence-based treatment. Breastcancer.org does NOT recommend or endorse alternative medicine.

Posted on: Feb 10, 2018 04:50PM

twinbabes wrote:

Hi just thought I'd throw this question out there, is there anyone who still enjoys to relax with an an alcoholic drink.? Do we all have to be made to feel guilty by sharing a drink with our mates at a social do or even a quiet drink at home with a loved one? Its so nice to able to sit with friends or family have a chat and a drink on the weekend or when ever, I dont want to be made to feel guilty over one of (what I consider ) lifes pleasures. I enjoy a lot of things that would be considered bad for someone that has bc, but bugger it, if you cant enjoy your life the way you want to, whats the point?

Log in to post a reply

Page 1 of 1 (24 results)

Posts 1 - 24 (24 total)

Log in to post a reply

Feb 11, 2018 11:06AM Meow13 wrote:

Have a drink, relax. I know several BC women that never drank a drop in their life. I think moderation and happiness is the key.

Log in to post a reply

Feb 11, 2018 11:19AM Lula73 wrote:

there are plenty of women who swear off sugar, alcohol, carbs, anything that’s not organic, etc. I personally haven’t seen any well controlled (randomized, placebo controlled) studies accepted for publication in a credible peer reviewed journal showing that women who do this have lower recurrence/Mets risk or lower incidence of BC. However, I do think it makes them feel more in control of their life by doing so. I don’t think anyone would argue that eating healthier (whole foods vs processed foods) has many health benefits whether you’ve had cancer or not. But even too much of a healthy thing can be harmful. And so, everything in moderation becomes the mantra/advice. A drink now and again IMO is not a big deal. Drinking to excess is another matter entirely.

-Lula Dx 1/2017, DCIS/IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/2 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 2/14/2017 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic ovary removal; Reconstruction (left): DIEP flap; Reconstruction (right): DIEP flap Hormonal Therapy 3/3/2017 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery 11/1/2017 Prophylactic ovary removal Hormonal Therapy 1/3/2018 Femara (letrozole)
Log in to post a reply

Feb 11, 2018 02:37PM illimae wrote:

Yes, I have reduced how much and how often I drink but I enjoy it whenever I please. There’s a “how about drinking” thread, many there share stories, cocktail talk, recipes, etc

Diagnosed at 41 Stage IV De Novo Dx 11/16/2016, IDC, Left, 5cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 3, 3/13 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/2/2017 Abraxane (albumin-bound or nab-paclitaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/2/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 1/2/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Surgery 6/26/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary Radiation Therapy 8/10/2017 Breast, Lymph nodes Dx 10/5/2017, IDC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to brain Radiation Therapy 10/20/2017 External: Brain Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 03:56AM NotVeryBrave wrote:

I still drink the same as ever - which is to say 1-2 drinks maybe once a week. I don't feel that anything I have done has caused me to have cancer. And I don't think there is any real proof that making major changes to my life is going to save me.


TCHP x 6 with pCR. One year of Herceptin. DTI pre-pec surgery. Quit Tamoxifen after 3 months. Dx 11/21/2016, DCIS/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 12/18/2016 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 12/19/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 12/19/2016 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 5/8/2017 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Hormonal Therapy 9/9/2017 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 04:08AM - edited Feb 12, 2018 04:09AM by ErenTo

I still enjoy my red wine and occasionally other stuff, guilt-free.Try to keep it to 3 glasses a week. And go with higher quality wine. Life is too short for bad wine (and coffee)!

Survived an unexplained sudden cardiac arrest b/w surgery and chemo (while attending a chemo info session at the hospital). Code blue, CPR, induced coma, ICU, ICD. Escaped alive with heart and brain unscathed! Dx 12/8/2014, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 6/13 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 1/12/2015 Lumpectomy: Left Chemotherapy 3/20/2015 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Ellence (epirubicin), Fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil), Taxotere (docetaxel) Hormonal Therapy 7/24/2015 Aromasin (exemestane), Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone), Zoladex (goserelin) Radiation Therapy 8/4/2015 Breast, Lymph nodes
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 04:11AM Jojobird wrote:

When I asked if I could drink, my onc said, "Even your oncologist enjoys the occasional mojito." In other words, go for it. In moderation.

My blog: chestybreastypuller.blogspot.com/ Dx 3/2016, IDC, Right, 6cm+, Stage IIIC, Grade 3, 21/21 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Dx 4/2018, IDC, Right, 5cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy Chemotherapy AC + T (Taxol) Surgery Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 04:29AM moth wrote:

Alcohol is a carcinogen. Each person has to make their own risk benefit assessment on the consumption of alcohol. Obviously people make different decisions on this & that's clear on these boards. I think just as some people decide against some treatments, they're making their own risk benefit decision.

According to the WHO, there is no known safe level of alcohol consumption.
And there are lots of studies showing substantial correlation between alcohol consumption and several cancers. It's also a lot of empty calories which can increase bmi & excess weight is a separate risk factor for breast cancer so that might factor into people's calculations.


https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevent...


" More than 100 epidemiologic studies have looked at the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of breast cancer in women. These studies have consistently found an increased risk of breast cancer associated with increasing alcohol intake. A meta-analysis of 53 of these studies (which included a total of 58,000 women with breast cancer) showed that women who drank more than 45 grams of alcohol per day (approximately three drinks) had 1.5 times the risk of developing breast cancer as nondrinkers (a modestly increased risk) (7). The risk of breast cancer was higher across all levels of alcohol intake: for every 10 grams of alcohol consumed per day (slightly less than one drink), researchers observed a small (7 percent) increase in the risk of breast cancer. "

Dx at 50; Left, IDC/DCIS 1.7 cm, Stage I, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, pathology ER+/PR-, HER2-; Oncotype says ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/12/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Chemotherapy 2/14/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy Hormonal Therapy
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 04:57AM MelissaDallas wrote:

From a previous post by Beesie:

Post a replyReport this Post

May 29, 2017 06:25PM - edited May 29, 2017 06:42PM by Beesie

"Smoking most definitely increases one's risk of developing lung cancer, but not all smokers do get lung cancer-in fact only about 15% of smokers get lung cancer- and not smoking does not guarantee you will not be diagnosed with lung cancer. Some people who've never smoked do get lung cancer. But that does not change the fact that smoking statistically increases one's risk, nor does it make it all a crapshoot. Not smoking definitively decreases one's risk of lung cancer.

Whether we will someday see similar conclusive evidence linking BC and alcohol use remains to be seen, but there is definitely emerging evidence that points in that direct."

I could not disagree more strongly. There is simply no comparison between smoking & lung cancer and alcohol consumption & breast cancer.

First of all, the evidence is actually quite clear that there is a link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer. We are not waiting for "someday". It's not that there have been one or two studies suggesting a possible link and we are holding our breath, waiting for more information and waiting for the other shoe to drop. No, there have been dozens of studies already done that have looked at the effect of alcohol consumption on breast cancer rates.

The conclusion of this particular report - which was a meta-analysis that for the 'BC and alcohol' findings combined and assessed the results from 16 studies for pre-menopausal women, and 34 studies for post-menopausal women - was that there is in fact a statistically significant link between BC and alcohol. What that means is that the research findings are not random or questionable (from at statistical standpoint) and if more research were to be done, it would be expected that the results would likely be in the same ballpark as the findings in this study. That's what "statistically significant" means.

What "statistically significant" does not mean is that the effect of alcohol consumption on breast cancer rates is "significant". What the findings from this study actually show is that while there quite certainly is some relationship between alcohol consumption and breast cancer rates, the impact of alcohol consumption on breast cancer rates is in fact very small; based on one small drink a day (mostly self-reported, so maybe it's a bit more than one small drink a day), the increase in risk is only 5% for pre-menopausal women and 9% for post-menopausal women. What this study also concludes is that it is not understood how or why this relationship exists, and it is hypothesized that there may not in fact be a direct link (i.e. alcohol consumption increases breast cancer risk) but rather an indirect link (i.e. alcohol consumption reduces nutrient absorption in the body and the lack of these nutrients is what increases breast cancer risk, and/or alcohol consumption increases estrogen levels and this in turn increases breast cancer risk). If the link is indirect, then it becomes much easier to mitigate the impact of alcohol consumption by addressing these other more direct factors (folate, carotenoids, etc.).

Smoking, on the other hand, is unquestionably directly linked to the development of lung cancer. From my quick research, it appears that smokers are at least 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than non-smokers. That's a 2000% increase in risk (vs. 5% pre-menopausal / 9% menopausal for alcohol and breast cancer). While it is true that most smokers do not develop lung cancer, it is also true that approx. 85% - 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking.

What this means is that if 15 people develop lung cancer, 13 of those cases will be directly caused by smoking.

On the other hand, if 15 people develop breast cancer, 1 case might have been indirectly and/or partially caused by alcohol consumption.

Looked at another way, if we have 100 smokers, 15 will end up with lung cancer as a direct result of smoking.

If we have 100 women who all consume 1 alcoholic beverage a day, 13 will end up with breast cancer, but less than 1 case will have possibly been indirectly caused by the alcohol consumption.

There is simply no comparison.

Edited for grammar error only.

Dx 9/15/05, DCIS-MI, 6cm+ Gr3 DCIS w/IDC microinvasion, Stage IA, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR- "No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear." Edmund Burke

LCIS, extensive sclerosing adenosis, TAH/BSO & partial omentectomy for mucinous borderline ovarian tumor.
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 10:52AM - edited Feb 12, 2018 10:59AM by Meow13

blah blah blah

http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-...://www.bing.com/search?q=what perecentage of lung cancer is attributed to smoking&qs=n&form=QBLH&sp=-1&pq=undefined&sc=0-35&sk=&cvid=68D400E172044D20BBC8974768E4C513

Doesn't sound like 15% to me.

If we knew what caused BC we might have a chance at preventing it. But we don't

Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 10:54AM twinbabes wrote:

Thanks for the feedback everyone, Its so nice to know that there are others that still enjoy some of lifes little pleasures without being made to feel guilt. Thanks for the heads up on the " how about drinking " thread illimae, I'll check it out , and to everyone else out there that has the occasional drink "CHEERS TO YOU ALL" and live life to the fullest.

Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 12:17PM Lula73 wrote:

so true, meow!

-Lula Dx 1/2017, DCIS/IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/2 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 2/14/2017 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic ovary removal; Reconstruction (left): DIEP flap; Reconstruction (right): DIEP flap Hormonal Therapy 3/3/2017 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery 11/1/2017 Prophylactic ovary removal Hormonal Therapy 1/3/2018 Femara (letrozole)
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 12:56PM mustlovepoodles wrote:

I am not the least bit concerned about the small amount of alcohol that I consume, 1-3 drinks a month. Not only that, but I eat donuts, cookies, chips, and the occasional corn dog! I'm 61. I figure something is gonna kill me sooner or later. Life is not worth living if i can't have a taco and diet Coke with rum & lime now and then.

Oncotype 23. Positive for PALB2 & Chek2 gene mutations. My breasts are trying to kill me! Dx 7/20/2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/2 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- Surgery 8/20/2015 Lumpectomy Surgery 9/3/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Chemotherapy 10/19/2015 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 2/4/2016 Prophylactic mastectomy: Left, Right Surgery 10/19/2016 Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery
Log in to post a reply

Feb 12, 2018 01:47PM Beesie wrote:

Melissa, thank you for reposting my earlier post. 😀

Meow, please read that post again. I was not saying that only 15% of lung cancers are attributed to smoking. What I said is that 85%-90% of lung cancers are attributed to smoking. That said, although smoking is by far the greatest cause of lung cancer, only ~15% of smokers develop lung cancer.

By comparison, from all the studies that have been done looking at the impact of alcohol consumption on breast cancer rates (and there have been a lot of studies), it appears that somewhere between 5% to 10% (at absolute most) of all breast cancers might indirectly be caused by alcohol.

Alcohol is a carcinogen, and it does increase breast cancer risk, but it is a low risk factor, increasing risk by only a small amount, particularly when compared to factors that sit outside of our control, such as family history, breast density, getting older (the 2nd most significant risk factor), and being female (the single greatest risk factor).

Everyone needs to make their own decisions about what is right for them to do when it comes to alcohol consumption. Facts are helpful; broad generalizations and fear-mongering are not.

Personally, I have a glass of wine most nights with dinner. It's something I enjoy and I decided after my diagnosis that I would not give breast cancer the power to take the pleasure out of my life.

Dx 9/15/05, DCIS-MI, 6cm+ Gr3 DCIS w/IDC microinvasion, Stage IA, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR- “No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.” Edmund Burke
Log in to post a reply

Feb 13, 2018 01:27AM - edited Feb 13, 2018 01:28AM by EastcoastTS

Twin:

I did cut down after my diagnosis (I was the after-work-wine-for-stress-release girl) and a huge benefit was reduction of migraines! Hello, tannins. However, I have not cut it out completely. My husband and I love to travel and eat out and, frankly, having a glass of wine or one of the many great craft beers we have to choose from is a JOY of life. I've done a lot of others things to improve outcomes. Exercise, diet, etc. (even if I wasn't horrible there in the first place) but, damn, are we supposed to live on carrots and yoga? (I love yoga, btw!)

But it's all a very personal choice!

Cheers!

Dx@ 49. Oncotype: 14, BRCA 1/2- Dx 1/4/2017, ILC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 2/26/2017 Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Surgery 9/7/2017 Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
Log in to post a reply

Feb 13, 2018 01:45AM gb2115 wrote:

I don't drink much anymore, but when I do I feel guilty, and I wish I didn't because I'd like to feel freedom to have some wine now and then. I might have a glass of something on Valentine's day. It's confusing because my surgeon said one drink a week (but she said she understands if I wish to drink more LOL), and MO said three drinks a week. So I really want to have a glass of wine a week, but don't like how worried I get when I do drink. Ugh. I'm not that way with eating though, thankfully. You have to balance risk reduction with quality of life. I agree that if we knew what actually caused the cancer, it would be easier to avoid. I was flippantly told by a family member to "just avoid sugar" and tried to show me internet articles by a known medical quack. No thanks! :-) This is where quality of life comes into play---I survived cancer, the treatment of which had some horrific moments. If I want to eat a dark chocolate truffle, that is exactly what I'm going to do.

Dx IDC in October 2016, stage 2A, 1.2 cm ER/PR+ Her2-, Grade 2, 1/3 nodes. Mammaprint low risk luminal A, Lumpectomy + radiation + tamoxifen. Age 38 at diagnosis.
Log in to post a reply

Feb 13, 2018 01:51AM pupmom wrote:

Twinbabes, that thread "how about drinking" is also hilarious. I used to read it just for the laughs! The posters are so funny! Helps to laugh. Smile

Life is what happens while we're making other plans. Dx 10/18/2011, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 1, 2/21 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
Log in to post a reply

Feb 13, 2018 01:55AM - edited Feb 13, 2018 01:56AM by claireinaz

And for another perspective from the Fred Hutchison Cancer Center:

"Conclusion: In this large study, consumption of alcohol before or after breast cancer diagnosis did not increase risks of overall or cause-specific mortality.".

https://www.fredhutch.org/en/news/center-news/2016...

And the conflict (for me) goes on and on. Personally I don't hyperventilate about a few drinks every once in a while. And I might drink a bit more depending on where I go on vacation and what I do--sitting by a pool or a beach vs. rowing a raft down a river and camping out. But I don't drink every day, nor every weekend, nor every week, and I do try to be mindful about the amount of alcohol when I do. I find that choosing lower alcohol beers are better for me. I wish I liked red wine but in hindsight, it's probably better than I don't.

Claire in AZ

9/29/11 ILC, 2 c. stage II grade 1, ER/PR+ HER2-, 6/11 nodes, lumpectomy, DDAC x 4, Taxol x 12, 33 rads, Tamoxifen/arimidex/aromasin, BMX/immed recon 7/3/13 "In the midst of winter, I found in me an invincible summer.” Albert Camus
Log in to post a reply

Feb 13, 2018 05:15AM dani_katze wrote:

I still drink, not every day, but sometimes on weekends I have 2 to 4 drinks. For what I have read, this is a lot. But honestly I enjoy it, but now that I know that this a carcinogen I feel kind of guilty and feel that the only way is it to cut it off absolutely... because I've tried to slow it down, but it doesn't work always for me... and last year I had breast cancer recurrence. :(

Daniela Dx 6/13/2011, DCIS, Left, 4cm, Stage 0, 2/2 nodes, ER+ Surgery 8/18/2011 Mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): Nipple reconstruction, Nipple tattoo, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement
Log in to post a reply

Feb 13, 2018 06:14AM edwards750 wrote:

Well said Bessie - as usual. I believe in everything in moderation. I have no intentions of doing without sugar or alcohol - for me that’s a Blue Moon beer usually a few times a month.

To each his/her own. It’s interesting when the experts list the risk factors for BC. I know a number of women who don’t fit the bill at all and all of them got BC.

My Oncologist said they simply don’t know why some women drew the unlucky card. Throw in genetics and their findings show 70% of BC cases are not genetically driven. My sister and I and my SIL all fall into that category. Our mothers had BC.

It’s a personal decision right, wrong or indifferent.

Diane

Log in to post a reply

Feb 13, 2018 04:30PM twinbabes wrote:

I have to agree with all of you gals, that having a few drinks isnt going to change what we are going through, and it s enjoyable to boot! So Im still going to chuck a few down the old hatchet, and not worry about what the mainstreamers think. The romans drank the vino and their still kicking (well their ancestors are) " so bottoms up everyone " .... CHEERS !

Log in to post a reply

Feb 14, 2018 01:34AM Jojobird wrote:

mustlovepoodles,

I heart you! Sooo agree with you. Friday is my "cheat" day, meaning I do eat cake with frosting, a Coke, and a mojito or two. The rest of the week I have a pretty structured diet, but I do NOT freak out if I chow on a chocolate or two. Life's too short.

Even oncologists drink. ;D

My blog: chestybreastypuller.blogspot.com/ Dx 3/2016, IDC, Right, 6cm+, Stage IIIC, Grade 3, 21/21 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Dx 4/2018, IDC, Right, 5cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy Chemotherapy AC + T (Taxol) Surgery Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
Log in to post a reply

Feb 14, 2018 05:09AM - edited Feb 14, 2018 05:12AM by Heidihill

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180202085241.htm

This is the reason I drink red wine everyday... to prevent dementia! But just a glass in deference to BC.

Dx 8/2007, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 2, 2/19 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Hormonal Therapy 3/25/2015 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
Log in to post a reply

Feb 14, 2018 09:31AM lt84 wrote:

what do the oncologists say about drinking? I like 4 glasses on a Friday night. Is this bad

Log in to post a reply

Feb 17, 2018 07:51PM - edited Feb 17, 2018 07:58PM by Sophiemara

I think it's a personal choice...like any pleasure in life whether it's chocolate, wine, cigarettes or cake.

The day I was dx was the end of my relationship with alcohol, esp as I am ER+. The scientific connection between excess estrogen and alcohol was enough for me, particularly as I was dx young at 34..maybe I'd think to hell with it if I was in my 80s.

It's been 2.5 years since I stopped and I don't miss it. I spent a vast period of my adult life binge drinking and feel like I've been there, done that.

I like to think i don't need to crutch on anything. I never used it as a relaxation method, I feel happier without it and lost 14lb, but that's just me

Dx 9/2015, IDC, Right, 6cm+, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 2/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole), Zoladex (goserelin) Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes, Chest wall Chemotherapy AC + T (Taxol) Surgery Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Latissimus dorsi flap; Reconstruction (right): Latissimus dorsi flap

Page 1 of 1 (24 results)