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Topic: Risk Assessment Appointment to discuss results

Forum: High Risk for Breast Cancer — Due to family history, genetics, or other factors.

Posted on: Jul 16, 2020 07:16AM

Mavericksmom wrote:

Tomorrow I am going to meet with my MO, who is also part of the Genetics Department at the facility where I had my breast cancer treatment, and my genetics counselor, together, to receive the results of my genetic testing. I already know I am negative for BRCA genes from testing done in 2004.

I am wondering if there are any specific questions I should be prepared to ask at this meeting? I am not expecting to hear I have any significant genetic defects, but I like to go to meetings with questions. As of now, all I plan to do is to listen really well to what they have to say. In other words, I expect to be remain quiet through most of the appointment. I just don't want to find out later I should have asked about something in particular or paid particular attention to certain words or phrases.

Thanks in advance!



Dx 6/6/2003, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/24 nodes, ER+/PR+ Dx 12/4/2018, ILC, Left, 1cm, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH)
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Jul 16, 2020 07:49AM - edited Jul 16, 2020 07:51AM by MelissaDallas

Maverick, based on my experience, there are far too many variables to formulate specific questions. IF you have any significant mutations, etc. questions would be very specific to that particular gene. I think, just listen. The geneticists tend to be very good at explaining in detail and any specific recommended monitoring schedules or testing (colonoscopies, skin checks...)

Just plan on asking best way to contact for follow up questions when you have had time to digest any information. I think it is pretty much built into the system that you will be contacted in the future should information on any VUSs change as time goes on.

LCIS, extensive sclerosing adenosis, TAH/BSO & partial omentectomy for mucinous borderline ovarian tumor.
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Jul 16, 2020 09:00AM Mavericksmom wrote:

Thank you Melissa! I really appreciate your feedback!

Dx 6/6/2003, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/24 nodes, ER+/PR+ Dx 12/4/2018, ILC, Left, 1cm, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH)
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Jul 16, 2020 10:36AM - edited Jul 16, 2020 10:37AM by Moderators

Hi Mavericksmom,

You may find these pages helpful from the main Breastcancer.org site:


We hope this helps! Please keep us posted with what you learn!

To send a Private Message to the Mods: community.breastcancer.org/mem...
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Jul 16, 2020 06:59PM Mangosan99 wrote:

Mavericksmom/Moderators, Thank you for asking/answering these questions. I am in between genetic counseling and receiving results and this information was very helpful!

Dx 7/7/2020, DCIS, Left, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 2, 0/6 nodes, ER+/PR- Surgery 9/16/2020 Lymph node removal; Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement
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Jul 17, 2020 07:46AM - edited Jul 18, 2020 02:45AM by Mavericksmom

Yes, thank you Moderators!

Mangosan99, sounds like we are going through the same thing. I will receive my results at an appointment this afternoon. I will post again after I have time to process whatever I am told. Please let me know how your results turn out! I am so glad this topic/ Moderators, helped more than just me!


Update: 54 genes tested, all negative. No answers as to why my sisters, mother and I had breast cancer, but it isn't genetic. The only positive is that I know I didn't pass anything on to my children, and really that is all I expected to learn anyway.

In hindsight, I would have stopped after having the tests for the BRCA genes and saved a lot of money. I am no better or worse off because of the testing.

I would NOT recommend genetic testing for others with the exception of really young, 20/30 yr old women with a breast cancer diagnosis, to rule out the BRCA gene defects. Anything more is a waste of time and money, which is the likely reason insurance won't pay for it. I am thankful for a negative result because it reinforced my decision to stop taking Letrozole. I highly doubt I will ever get a positive diagnosis for breast cancer again. I am far more concerned with surviving the Covid pandemic!

I wish the counselor had just called me with the result instead of making me drive an hour for a negative result. That was really stupid, especially during a pandemic! Oh well, live and learn!

They told me my daughter could be put in their "high risk" program, and while that is nice of them, it is impractical. She isn't high risk if the family breast cancer is not genetic. All that would do is add stress to her already stressful life of being a working mother! Her gynecologist is more than capable of keeping her informed on what tests she should have to stay healthy. I don't consider myself high risk, I consider myself unlucky!

Dx 6/6/2003, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/24 nodes, ER+/PR+ Dx 12/4/2018, ILC, Left, 1cm, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH)
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Jul 18, 2020 09:31AM Mangosan99 wrote:

Mavericksmom, Thank you for coming back and sharing your experience and results for "the rest of the story."

I just wanted to add, and ask others to help me out here, but familial genetic mutations are just one aspect of risk assessment, right?

I have used the risk assessment calculator at https://bcrisktool.cancer.gov as I gather more information about risk. I add this because although my mom had breast cancer twice (once at 50 and again at 68, each primary cancers) and my grandmother once (at 73), I chose to ignore that and live in my own bubble about it--while I was also a busy working mother.

Fortunately, I am only seeing abnormal cell changes now (at 52) after routine monitoring, rather than aggressive screening. I have a daughter too and I am planning to pass along any/all information that I receive that applies to her, to include the risk assessment calculator, even if I test negative for all known genetic mutations.

What I have learned so far from genetic counseling is that my mother, myself, and my daughter are the only females in each generation so it is the only data we have. If any of us had sisters, and they had cancer too, the family history in upon itself would add risk.

I guess what I am trying to get at is that there is a good chance there are gene mutations that we do not yet know about that might explain the recurrences in our families, but they have not been identified. So, we have to pay attention to our family history as our only known crystal ball. I'm not so sure you were just "unlucky."

Depending on what my definitive diagnosis is (still trying to figure it out), I may have wished I had not considered myself so different than my mother and her mother and sought risk counseling a little bit earlier. I recall my gyn telling me a bit about it but I was sure it did not apply to me. And maybe I would have never believed it until it happened. I'm a bit stubborn that way.

Dx 7/7/2020, DCIS, Left, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 2, 0/6 nodes, ER+/PR- Surgery 9/16/2020 Lymph node removal; Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement
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Jul 18, 2020 09:49AM - edited Jul 18, 2020 09:49AM by exbrnxgrl

Mavericksmom,

I had the BRCA test when first diagnosed (the only genetic test at the time) and then the Ambry panel about five years after that. All were negative but... the tests are only for known genes which might put one at risk. I too have some family history so when more genes are discovered, I will test again. My insurance completely covered the cost of testing* and though everything has been negative so far, that may not be the case in the future.


* My ethnic group has a higher risk for BRCA than the general population. I don't know if this factored into insurance covering the testing costs

Bilateral mx 9/7/11 with one step ns reconstruction. As of 11/21/11, 2cm met to upper left femur Dx 7/8/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/7/2011 Lymph node removal: Left; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left); Reconstruction (right) Dx 11/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Stage IV, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 11/21/2011 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 11/21/2011 Bone Hormonal Therapy 6/19/2014 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane)
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Jul 18, 2020 10:48AM Mavericksmom wrote:

Ravelry, it cost me $250, which I was Ok paying. If it was going to be more, I wouldn't have had it done.

I don't know what factors in, but had I stayed with the same lab, it would have been covered. Because I went to INVITAE, it wasn't because I had previously been tested for the BRCA genes. The original lab didn't offer a test my counselor recommended for me.

Ethnicity may have something to do with it?

Mangosan99, I should clarify that the reason I feel genetic testing is pretty much a waste of money is that outside of the BRCA genes, nothing else seems to increase the risk enough to change treatment. My results didn't change my treatment/surveillance and it won't change my daughter's surveillance. My MO even said it was fine for my daughter to put off having a mammogram for a year due to the pandemic. They are just guidelines anyway. This year she will turn the age that is 10 years younger than my age at my first diagnosis.

A positive BRCA gene is a whole different issue. It does directly change treatments.

Looking back, I wish I had not been tested again. Regardless of what they discover in the future, this was the last time for me. I will never find out why so many in my family had breast cancer. I will continue with mammograms every year or two, but other than that, I don't plan to do anything more.


Dx 6/6/2003, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/24 nodes, ER+/PR+ Dx 12/4/2018, ILC, Left, 1cm, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH)
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Jul 18, 2020 11:43AM MinusTwo wrote:

Mavrick - I finished treatment before genetic testing was widely available. And I was ER/PR negative. But from what I've read here, I think that the testing sometimes helps the docs determine whether to do chemo or not. If so, that's really useful. And I expect there are other new things discovered every day.

2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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Jul 18, 2020 01:20PM Salamandra wrote:

No answers as to why my sisters, mother and I had breast cancer, but it isn't genetic.

I think it would be more accurate to say that there isn't a known genetic explanation. When I had genetic testing, that's what the counselor told me - there are still a lot of genetic factors they don't even know to test for, let alone understanding the impact.

Dx at 39. 1.8cm. Oncotype 9. Dx 9/19/2018, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 10/17/2018 Lumpectomy; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Hormonal Therapy 11/1/2018 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy 12/2/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/18/2019 Fareston (toremifene)
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Jul 18, 2020 01:41PM exbrnxgrl wrote:

Salamandra, you hit the nail on the head! I always go back to the fact that when I was first dx’ed they could only test for BRCA mutations, as those were the only ones known as the time. Look how many more mutations have been discovered since then.

Bilateral mx 9/7/11 with one step ns reconstruction. As of 11/21/11, 2cm met to upper left femur Dx 7/8/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/7/2011 Lymph node removal: Left; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left); Reconstruction (right) Dx 11/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Stage IV, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 11/21/2011 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 11/21/2011 Bone Hormonal Therapy 6/19/2014 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane)
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Jul 18, 2020 02:23PM - edited Jul 18, 2020 02:27PM by Mavericksmom

In my case, it's unlikely genetic. My mom was 83 when diagnosed, so who knows for her. My sisters were 59 and 72. I am the only one who was premenopausal.(49)

Those sisters have daughters who are in their late 40's and early 50's as does my brother, and no signs of breast cancer. I can trace both my fathers parents and my mothers parents to the 1600's and most of their family lived well into their mid 80's to mid 90's. Why my family, mom and 3/4 daughters? Always a chance of genetics, but very doubtful. Sometimes it is just coincidence. More likely something we were exposed to. When I was little they used to drive all over our streets spraying to kill mosquitoes. In the 50's and 60's there were a lot of new chemicals and little was done to protect people from them, it was a whole different era.

The former generation (mom, aunts) and present generation (my children, nieces) basically unaffected. So what happened in the late 50's and early 60's that stopped in the late 60's to present day?

Really doesn't sound like a genetic issue to me and my counselor didn’t seem to think so either.

Dx 6/6/2003, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/24 nodes, ER+/PR+ Dx 12/4/2018, ILC, Left, 1cm, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH)
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Jul 18, 2020 02:45PM AliceBastable wrote:

My mom and a paternal aunt had breast cancer. I've had breast cancer. My maternal grandmother had uterine cancer. I've had endometrial/uterine cancer. My dad had kidney cancer. I've had kidney cancer. My dad and paternal grandmother had basal cell skin cancer. I've had several basal cell skin cancers.

My BS sent me to a genetic counselor for testing, which came back negative, BUT my insurance did not pay for comprehensive testing, so I have no idea if there might be some lesser-known mutation it didn't catch. I'm not sure I care. My BS seemed more interested in why I'm a crap magnet than I am. If/when another cancer shows up, I'm more concerned with getting rid of it than figuring out how it got there. If I have any body parts left when I die, I'll leave my remaining remains to a lab to figure out.

Endometrial cancer 2010, basal cell multiples, breast cancer 2018, kidney cancer 2018. Cancer's a bitch, but I'm a bigger one with more practice. Dx 5/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 1/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/11/2018 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Surgery 8/8/2018 Radiation Therapy 10/29/2018 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
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Jul 18, 2020 04:16PM Mavericksmom wrote:

Alice, I totally agree! I had 18 surgeries since 1980’ for various reasons, I too am only interested now in dealing with things as they happen. No more testing to find out why.

Dx 6/6/2003, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/24 nodes, ER+/PR+ Dx 12/4/2018, ILC, Left, 1cm, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH)
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Sep 21, 2020 10:03AM Onthinice1 wrote:

I am going for a risk assessment next week. From what I have read you have 3 choices, watch closely, take chemopreventive medication or have prophylactic surgery. Is that correct? You wait and watch to be diagnosed, hoping its early, take a drug that has horrendous side effects that lowers your risk somewhat and doesn't provide protection for all types of breast cancer, and if you are diagnosed that "Golden standard" medication used to prevent recurrence no longer works for ER positive breast cancers(the most common type), or ask for prophylactic mastectomy that has a 90-98 percent chance of seeing you never experience this monster, BUT insurance will only cover this if you are extreme high risk, with many biopsies have positive genetic testing and are young enough for it to be cost effective for the insurance provider. Well, most older women get diagnosed, having a genetic predisposition is low, and many times its to late when you need a biopsy! It sounds like none of those choices are helpful to most high risk women who go on to become breast cancer survivors and face nonstop fear anxiety and a life that is forever changed.

I am a 12 year cervical cancer survivor. I had a radical hysterectomy, int/ext radiation therapy and 6 rounds of chemo. I am 59 and in good shape except for the effects of radiation therapy weakening my bones, causing osteoporosis and damaging my small intestine, causing partial obstructions. I have a strong family history of breast cancer, and dense breast tissue, which they warn you about after each mammogram by letter, but I'm sure that isn't enough to have surgery. You just wait until the monster hits and hope you are able to do treatment. I never realized breast cancer had such a high recurrence rate and the most common type of breast cancer relies heavily on taking tamoxifen to lower recurrence. It seems so many survivors/families go through so much pain, anxiety, torture, financial burden and hell when an operation can treat this very successfully and prevent very expensive cancer treatments, which lead to other serious medical issues that require additional medications, surgeries and other life threatening damage to other parts of their bodies. It seems like torture.

Please let me know what important questions to ask and what to expect on this visit. I appreciate your help, as this is my first posting.

The anxiety and dark thoughts that surround this make life very hard to enjoy. One day at a time and prayers to all of you.

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Sep 21, 2020 12:01PM - edited Sep 21, 2020 12:24PM by Beesie

Onthinice, you are correct about the choice of options, but I don't think you have a full or accurate understanding of each of the options. Or maybe you are in a place where you've just chosen to focus on the negative aspects.

"You wait and watch to be diagnosed, hoping its early, take a drug that has horrendous side effects that lowers your risk somewhat and doesn't provide protection for all types of breast cancer, and if you are diagnosed that "Golden standard" medication used to prevent recurrence no longer works for ER positive breast cancers(the most common type), or ask for prophylactic mastectomy that has a 90-98 percent chance of seeing you never experience this monster, BUT insurance will only cover this if you are extreme high risk, with many biopsies have positive genetic testing and are young enough for it to be cost effective for the insurance provider. Well, most older women get diagnosed, having a genetic predisposition is low, and many times its to late when you need a biopsy!"

"hoping its early" Well, 60% of invasive breast cancer diagnoses are localized, i.e. in the breast only with no lymph node involvement. If you add in DCIS, which is a pre-invasive diagnosis, it's more like 80%. That doesn't guarantee survival, of course, but the majority of early stage patients are successfully treated. With high risk screening, it is realistic to hope that a breast cancer diagnosis will be caught early. But again, no guarantee of course.

"a drug that has horrendous side effects" Some people do experience horrendous side effects. But many patients take Tamoxifen or AIs for 5 or 10 years with just a few side effects that are very manageable. Until someone is on these meds, they won't know how well they tolerate them.

"that lowers your risk somewhat" I don't consider a 50%+ reduction in breast cancer risk for high risk patients to be "somewhat".

"if you are diagnosed that "Golden standard" medication used to prevent recurrence no longer works for ER positive breast cancers". No. If you are diagnosed, it does not mean that Tamox. or an AI won't work to reduce the risk of a localized or metastatic cancer. And if you were on one of the meds before, you can always try another.

"insurance will only cover this if you are extreme high risk, with many biopsies have positive genetic testing and are young enough for it to be cost effective for the insurance provider." I'm sure there are cases, but I've been here a long time and I don't think I've ever seen insurance deny coverage for a PBMX for anyone who has tested positive for a genetic mutation, of any age and regardless of the number of biopsies they've had. I have also seen insurance companies often approve PBMXs for women with no genetic mutation but with a known high risk factor or sometimes even with just family history. I've seen more doctors balk at doing a PBMX for patients without an extensive history than I've seen insurance companies deny coverage. Not that I'm a fan of insurance companies - this board is littered with insurance refusal stories. But I've been surprised by the fact that PBMXs are usually approved even when the patient's doctors themselves are questioning the need.

"Well, most older women get diagnosed, having a genetic predisposition is low" Yes, breast cancer is more often diagnosed in women who are in their 60s and 70s. This is true of most diseases and is the result of the natural failure of our genes as humans get older. Only approx. 10%-15% of breast cancer is caused by a genetic mutation, and usually, but not always, these cancers are diagnosed at a younger age. That's because these individuals started life with 1/2 of the normal failure of one particular gene already done (i.e. the failed gene was inherited from one parent).

"many times its to late when you need a biopsy!" No. Only 5%-6% of breast cancer diagnoses are Stage IV de novo, i.e. metastatic at time of diagnosis.

What to ask at your appointment? Have you already had genetic testing done, and is this an appointment to discuss the results? Or is this an appointment to decide if you will proceed with genetic testing? If it's the latter, I've found the genetic counsellors are usually very good at explaining the pros and cons of testing, and what the results might mean, whether positive for a genetic mutation or not. One important question would be about the choice of the panel, i.e. the number of genes you would be tested for, and which ones. This will be influenced by family health history. These days most people get more than just BRCA testing.




“No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.” Edmund Burke
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Sep 21, 2020 01:54PM Onthinice1 wrote:

Hello Beesie. Thank you for all the valuable information. I am going next week for my first appt. to a breast oncologist and have no idea what will be done. I imagine a breast exam, review of the information/testing that has been referred, and some type of risk assessment. Do you know what I should expect on my first visit and must genetic testing be done? I apologize if I offended you by being negative. I know there are many positive stories from many people and don't want to upset anyone. Thanks again.

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Sep 21, 2020 03:07PM Beesie wrote:

Onthinice,

No offense taken. I'm just concerned that you are going into this process with such a negative outlook.

What prompted this appointment? I incorrectly assumed when you said that you were having a "risk assessment" that you would be seeing a genetic counsellor. I've talked to my Medical Oncologist about risk but I've never had a full risk assessment done by an oncologist.

I honestly don't know what will happen at your appointment. Is this 'breast oncologist' you are seeing a 'surgical oncologist' or a 'medical oncologist'? Both my Breast Surgeon and my Medical Oncologist refer patients to a genetic counsellor in cases where there is a family history of breast cancer. The genetic counsellor decides on whether genetic testing is appropriate and manages the process (lots of family history collection) and communication of the results. My MO then incorporates the outcome of any genetic testing done, and the assessment from the genetic counsellor, into his discussions about future risk.

Sounds like your process will be quite different, if your appointment is with an oncologist. So I don't know what will happen.




“No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.” Edmund Burke
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Sep 22, 2020 05:02AM Onthinice1 wrote:

Beesie- My gynecological oncologist referred me to this Doctor. She is a surgical breast oncologist but it is my understanding that I am meeting with her nurse practitioner for a risk assessment and breast exam. To be quite honest I am not certain what will take place, as this is all new to me. There has been no talk of any kind or reference to genetic testing thus far. What all does this consist of and have you had it done?

I had an abnormal mammogram that detected a cyst/ mass that was indeterminate and sent for an ultrasound that detected nothing declaring me birads 3 fibrocystic changes with repeat diagnostic mammo in six anxiety filled months. I received that mammo last month and nothing was found to compare to the previous mammo and the report states it was most likely superimposed breast tissue. I looked that up and it happens when the breast is compressed and tissue is overlapping. I was then put back to a birads 1 with a mammo schedule in 6 months for both breasts. All of this has caused much googling, fear and anxiety. Actually, it seems to have been a wake up call as to how high risk I actually am for this disease. I have dense breast tissue and a strong family history, also my age, so I thought it would be best to go to a breast dr. to determine what is the best option for myself. I have had no biopsies , took hormone replacement therapy, estrogen only, due to early menopause brought on by pelvic radiation for 12 years. I stopped taking it two months ago. I want to do everything in my power to prevent a breast cancer diagnosis.

I became a member of a tamoxifen group on Facebook last evening. It is devoted to help support the challenges these women face taking the drug and its many side effects. There were a few members taking it as a cancer preventative. If you take this drug for five years it then can offer an additional five years of protection. Is that correct? What happens then? I have so many unanswered questions but it seems to me the best prevention is prophylactic mastectomy. A drastic surgery but as we discussed there are 3 options: testing for early detection, medication (tamoxifen) or surgery.

Could you share your experience with me? What has brought you here and what other information do you feel would be helpful?

I am having difficulty navigating on this site since becoming a member as of yesterday so if I am doing something incorrectly please let me know. Can we somehow message personally if needed?

Also, my anxiety is extreme. My medical dr is referring me to a counselor of some type because I am taking 1 mg of Xanax daily. The fear of this and the unknown has been difficult to cope and deal with.

Once again, thank you for your support. You have no idea how much your contact and information is helping me.

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Sep 22, 2020 11:48AM MinusTwo wrote:

Thin - everyone's experience is different - but what you're seeing in all the threads could be useful - once you determine what you are facing. But don't try to put the cart before the horse. Many if not most of us have (had) dense breasts. I understand you have fears, but to date you have no reason to believe you have breast cancer. You are looking at preventative measures, which may or may not make any difference in the long run. And as you discovered - Dr. Google often causes more fear and harm than not. It's good that you're going to a counselor for anxiety. That should help.

We'll be thinking about you as you do your risk assessment next week. Please do come back & let us know the results. But until you have a specific breast cancer diagnosis, it's hard to answer questions that might not even be relevant.

2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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Sep 22, 2020 12:35PM AliceBastable wrote:

What you are doing right now is planning for recovery from a serious car accident when you haven't even gotten your learner's permit. So far, the only thing you know for sure is that your breast got squished crooked in the mammogram and it read a skin fold as questionable, AS IT SHOULD HAVE. That's it.

Endometrial cancer 2010, basal cell multiples, breast cancer 2018, kidney cancer 2018. Cancer's a bitch, but I'm a bigger one with more practice. Dx 5/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 1/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/11/2018 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Surgery 8/8/2018 Radiation Therapy 10/29/2018 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
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Sep 22, 2020 12:51PM Beesie wrote:

"What you are doing right now is planning for recovery from a serious car accident when you haven't even gotten your learner's permit."

Oh, that's perfect! It describes so many posts that we see here every day. Can I steal it?

By the way, Onthinice has moved her discussion here:

Topic: How to be preapproved for prophylactic breast surgery

https://community.breastcancer.org/forum/47/topics/877679?page=1#post_5592721


“No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.” Edmund Burke
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Sep 22, 2020 04:27PM MinusTwo wrote:

What you are doing right now is planning for recovery from a serious car accident when you haven't even gotten your learner's permit."

Oh Alice, I want to steal it too. We may see it popping up all over the place.

2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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Sep 22, 2020 05:56PM AliceBastable wrote:

Steal away! I always do my best explaining through analogies. 😀

Endometrial cancer 2010, basal cell multiples, breast cancer 2018, kidney cancer 2018. Cancer's a bitch, but I'm a bigger one with more practice. Dx 5/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 1/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/11/2018 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Surgery 8/8/2018 Radiation Therapy 10/29/2018 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes

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