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Topic: Increase in Tumor Growth After Biopsy?

Forum: Just Diagnosed — Discuss next steps, options, and resources.

Posted on: Nov 11, 2017 12:19PM

Lexica wrote:

Hi, All - I was diagnosed with Stage IIIC IDC in July 2017 (after two trips to breast care center in Nov 2016 and Mar 2017 to get the lump checked with nothing showing on mammo or US). I was wondering if anyone experienced fast growth of their tumor after the biopsy. My tumor was palpably less than 5 cm before biopsy, but grew to over 10 cm after needle core biopsy.

Diagnosed at 34. Dx 7/2017, IDC, Left, Stage IIIC, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 12/14/2017 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right Dx 12/27/2017, DCIS/IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 5/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Radiation Therapy 1/15/2018 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes, Chest wall Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane) Chemotherapy AC + T (Taxol)
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Nov 11, 2017 12:52PM Cpeachymom wrote:

Sorry you're here. My first breast surgeon explained it to me as the palpable lump is the main portion of your tumor, but it could have little "arms" stretching outward that we can't feel but that would be counted as the final tumor size. Maybe that is why yours was so much larger? Just throwing it out as a possibility

39 at Dx. Fate whispers to the warrior, 'You can not withstand the storm.' The warrior whispers back, 'I am the storm.' Dx 6/21/2017, IDC, Right, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 1, 1/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2017 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Right Hormonal Therapy 9/11/2017 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy 9/18/2017 Lymph nodes, Chest wall Surgery 10/10/2018 Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Surgery 3/24/2019 Reconstruction (right): Saline implant Hormonal Therapy Zoladex (goserelin)
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Nov 13, 2017 01:21PM MTwoman wrote:

It's also possible that a hematoma or seroma formed after the biopsy (depending on how much tissue was removed and how much you bled). Any fluid build up in the site of the biopsy can make it feel bigger. The other option is that imaging under-estimated the size. It is quite common for imaging to either under or over estimate the size of the lump as it is measured, once it is removed.

Dx 12/10/2002, DCIS, Right, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/19/2002 Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Surgery 12/23/2003 Reconstruction (right): Nipple reconstruction Surgery Reconstruction (right): Saline implant Surgery Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Surgery Mastectomy: Right
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Nov 14, 2017 12:41PM Outfield wrote:

MTwoman pretty much said exactly what I was going to say, but I'll say it anyway in case different words are helpful.

How easily my own tumor could be felt changed dramatically after my biopsy due to the swelling from the procedure. I don't even think I had a seroma (clearish fluid collection) or hematoma (blood collection) - the area was just swollen and bruised.

The only way you can firmly know your tumor's size is when it is removed and measured by a pathologist. There is no type of scan that is perfectly reliably accurate. It's not uncommon for a lump to look one size on mammogram, another on ultrasound, and yet another on MRI. So if you're thinking the tumor grew because it was smaller before the biopsy but a different type of scan was done after the biopsy, the difference is probably due to how well each particular type of scan showed it.

The other part of it is what Cpeachymom mentioned. If you had the scans, then the biopsy, then surgery, it's very possible that the scans could not pick up the "fingers" of cancer that can be seen by the pathologist, making it look smaller.

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Nov 16, 2017 05:34AM Lexica wrote:

thank you all for your responses! Looking forward to surgery and getting more answers. Four more weeks!

Diagnosed at 34. Dx 7/2017, IDC, Left, Stage IIIC, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 12/14/2017 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right Dx 12/27/2017, DCIS/IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 5/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Radiation Therapy 1/15/2018 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes, Chest wall Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane) Chemotherapy AC + T (Taxol)
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Jan 18, 2018 12:46AM - edited Jan 18, 2018 12:46AM by Styler

The same thing happen to me you could literally see and feel the tumor growing it went from being the size of a penny to a baseball in 1month and was not a hematoma. I saw 16 different doctors and none of them had a answer claimed they had Never had seen anything like it....Alternative Doctor said they never should of biopsied it that it was a contained tumor and the needles punctured caused it to be able to spread and grow....My Advice to any one Diagnosed is you are your best advocate, Do your research before making any decisions....

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Jan 20, 2018 06:08AM claireinaz wrote:

An for an alternative argument about the myth that needle biopsies cause cancer to spread and tumors to grow, see link. Let's not scare ourselves any more than we need to.

https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-researchers-find-cancer-biopsies-do-not-promote-cancer-spread/

9/29/11 ILC, 2 c. stage II grade 1, ER/PR+ HER2-, 6/11 nodes, lumpectomy, DDAC x 4, Taxol x 12, 33 rads, Tamoxifen/arimidex/aromasin, BMX/immed recon 7/3/13 "In the midst of winter, I found in me an invincible summer.” Albert Camus
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Aug 6, 2019 09:11AM AngryBird wrote:

My tumor grew considerably after a biopsy and after a liver biopsy I have had constant pain. Oncologists are idiots who preach whatever the pharmaceutical and insurance companies dictate to them. I truly wish I could affort a homeopathic doctor. I would then not have to subject myself to the witch doctors in oncology. 97% FAILURE RATE OF TREATMENTS.

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