We are 226,801 members in 82 forums discussing 158,973 topics.

Help with Abbreviations

Topic: Put a Lid on Yoplait

Forum: Managing Side Effects of Breast Cancer and Its Treatment —

This is a place to discuss concerns, tips and strategies for all types of side effects from all types of medications and treatments, (chemo/rads/hormonal/targeted/pain meds/etc.

Posted on: Sep 24, 2008 07:04PM

LauraGTO wrote:

Tell Yoplait to Put a Lid on rBGH!

Dear Friend,

Pink ribbon products are popping up all over the place, reminding us that Breast Cancer Awareness Month is nearly here. One of the pink ribbon products you've probably seen in stores is Yoplait yogurt. Yoplait makes a 10 cent donation for every pink lid that consumers mail back to the company.

Yoplait markets its yogurt as being healthy for women, but what's actually under the lid is a different story.

Yoplait yogurt is made with milk from cows that have been injected with the synthetic hormone recombinant bovine growth hormone (called rBGH or rBST). There are numerous health concerns surrounding rBGH, and breast cancer is one of them. The use of rBGH has been banned in the European Union, Canada, Australia, and Japan.

rBGH is unsafe and unnecessary. Mega-corporations like Wal-Mart and Starbucks are already making their dairy products rBGH-free. If these companies can do it, Yoplait can too.

Take Action: Tell Yoplait to Put a Lid on rBGH!

If Yoplait, a popular item with such a wide distribution, were to go rBGH-free, it would help make a safer product for millions of women. And that could truly make a difference in breast cancer-helping to stop the disease before it starts.

This October, instead of picking up lids, go online or pick up a pen, and ask the company to do the right thing for women's lives: tell Yoplait to put a lid on rBGH.

Take action at thinkbeforeyoupink.org

Sincerely,
Barbara A. Brenner
Executive Director

With hope there are possibilities. Dx 7/2005, ILC, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 2, 1/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
Log in to post a reply

Page 1 of 1 (13 results)

Posts 1 - 13 (13 total)

Log in to post a reply

Sep 24, 2008 07:15PM - edited Sep 24, 2008 07:17PM by Margerie

I think it is silly to spend 41 cents per ounce plus stationary to mail back those damn lids when they are only donating 10 cents each.  Just donate a big pile of money Yoplait and save us all the trouble!!  And I like their yogurt, but consider it a dessert, not a healthy food~ (with hormones added to boot).

That reminds me, I just went grocery shopping and saw Pink boxes of Wheat Thins and Honeymaid graham crackers.  I am not buying anything pink washed!!  Pretty soon, the stores will be a sea of pink.

Thanks for posting Laura.  I got a lot of insight from thinkbeforeyoupink.

Are we there yet? Dx 10/4/2005, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 5/19 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
Log in to post a reply

Sep 24, 2008 10:21PM Beesie wrote:

Yoplait have been running this program for 10 years.  They commit to a minimum contribution of $500,000 annually, regardless of the number of lids donated.  In 2007 they donated over $1.1 Million dollars and over the life of the program since inception, they've donated over $10 Million.  The money goes to the Susan B. Komen foundation.  And FYI, while 10 cents per lid may not seem like a lot, on an inexpensive product like yogurt, 10 cents probably represents a good percentage of the total profit.  So unlike a lot of companies who splash pink on their products, Yoplait actually do put the money behind it. 

As for the cost of mailing in lids, sending in one lid certainly doesn't make sense, but one option is to collect lots of lids before sending them in. 

As for rBGH, yes, it should be out of yogurt, and all other dairy products.  But right now, it is in every major brand of dairy product on the market in the U.S., not just Yoplait yogurt.  So rather than pick on Yoplait, perhaps the better approach would be to work on getting rBGH banned in the U.S.. 

Personally I hate all the pink stuff that is out there and I feel that a lot of companies use 'pink' just for their own gain, with little going to breast cancer research.  But there are some companies who have made a real long-term committment, and Yoplait happens to be one of them.   Sorry to disappoint. 

http://cms.komen.org/komen/Partners/CorporatePartners/011553

“No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.” Edmund Burke
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 09:01AM lisa39 wrote:

I agree with Beesie.  A better approach would be to work on getting rBHG banned in the U-S.

Lisa Dx 11/29/2007, IDC, 1cm, Stage I, Grade 3, 0/4 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 09:38AM LauraGTO wrote:

I am not against pink...I think it's great that we are getting the donations from companies and I think the awareness will ultimately lead to a cure. 

However, sometimes you have to start at the bottom and work your way up...if we're successful at getting Yoplait to stop using rBGH's, others will follow. It's a basic theory known as...competition.

rBGH has been boycotted by 95 percent of US dairy farmers, the FDA, Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Agriculture continue to license the drug (and other new genetically engineered foods) without pre-market safety tests.

And what about the cows? rBGH use will cause suffering to millions of animals: rBGH is like "crack" for cows. It "revs" their system and forces them to produce a lot more milk - but it also makes them sick.

Even the FDA admits that cows injected with rBGH (also known as Posilac) could suffer from increased udder infections (mastitis), severe reproductive problems, digestive disorders, foot and leg ailments, and persistent sores and lacerations. It's known that:
* rBGH makes cows sick. Monsanto has been forced to admit to about 20 veterinary health risks on its Posilac label including mastitis and udder inflammation. 
* rBGH milk is contaminated by pus from mastitis induced by rBGH, and antibiotics used to treat the mastitis. 
* rBGH milk is contaminated by the GE hormone which can be absorbed through the gut and induce immunological effects. 
* rBGH milk is chemically and nutritionally very different from natural milk. 
* rBGH milk is supercharged with high levels of a natural growth factor (IGF-1), excess levels of which have been incriminated as major causes of breast, colon, and prostate cancers. 
* rBGH factory farms pose a major threat to the viability of small dairy farms. Thus, rBGH 
enriches Monsanto while posing risks but no benefits to the entire U.S. population.
With hope there are possibilities. Dx 7/2005, ILC, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 2, 1/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 09:39AM Annabella58 wrote:

I agree with getting the rBHG banned in the US.  Since bc and reading up on it, I ONLY use organic dairy products along with organic chicken and beef.  I do buy organic veggies when I can find them, not always lots out there.

Since we are on the subject ladies, perdue chickens are literally stuffed with hormones.  And most of the beef out there has bovine growth hormones added.

I am not a vegatarian, but I have enough hormones already!!!

p.s. I loathe the pink also.  Enough already.  I feel assaulted by my cancer status everywhere I go and it's really hard to enjoy October and get your mind off things when it's everywhere.

Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 09:44AM lvtwoqlt wrote:

Margaret, for your 41 cents you can mail in 12 flattened lids in a business size envelope. They do say that they will donate up to 1.5 mil but last year they only donated 1.1 mil. I would like to flood them with lids to get them over the 1.5 mil and let them see that we are serious about making them donate the max amount they say they will donate.

Sheila

Women are like tea bags, we don't know how strong we are until we were thrown into hot water. Eleanore Roosevelt Diagnosed ADH Feb 2005, ADH Sept 2006 Surgery 2/12/2005 Lumpectomy: Left Surgery 9/10/2006 Lumpectomy: Right Hormonal Therapy 10/12/2006 Dx 4/27/2007, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 1, 0/7 nodes Surgery 6/1/2007 Mastectomy: Left, Right
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 10:31AM Beesie wrote:

Laura, I don't need to be sold about the problem with rBGHs.  And the statement you quoted from thinkbeforeyoupink, "However, sometimes you have to start at the bottom and work your way up...if we're successful at getting Yoplait to stop using rBGH's, others will follow. It's a basic theory known as...competition." does make a lot of sense.  But I have a fundamental problem with their approach. 

What thinkbeforeyoupink do is look at companies that are involved with breast cancer causes and attack those who are in industries that are not fully environmentally safe.  So while every major dairy and yogurt manufacturer uses milk with rBGH, they pick on Yoplait, the company that's donated $10 million to breast cancer research.  While the cosmetics industry is full of companies that use potentially harmful ingredients in their products, they attack Estee Lauder, a company that to-date has raised $220 Million for breast cancer research and programs.  Everyone knows that the auto industry is anything but environmentally friendly.  thinkbeforeyoupink picks on Ford, who have been involved with Komen for 14 years and have so far donated $95 Million.  (Note that while Yoplait is the focus of the thinkbeforeyoupink campaign this year, in past years Estee Lauder and Ford have been at the front of their campaigns.)

Yes, we all want these industries to clean up their act, but doesn't it seem just a little bit counterproductive to run a campaign only against those companies in these industries who donate large sums of money to breast cancer research?  All the other companies in these industries - those that don't put a penny to breast cancer causes - get off scot-free.  Seems pretty dumb to me.

One of the goals of  Breast Cancer Action, the group behind thinkbeforeyoupink, is to get the power out of the hands of the pharmeuctical companies.  How better to do this than to have hundreds of millions of dollars of money donated to independent scientists?  That's where the money from Yoplait, Estee Lauder and Ford goes.  By focusing a negative campaign against these companies, BCA discourage these types of campaigns.  Is all this bad publicity worth it for Yoplait?  Maybe they'll decide it's not.  You'd better believe that they're talking about it in their boardroom now, questioning whether they should continue this program next year. 

So with the approach that they've taken, I don't feel that BCA is helping their cause, or ours.   I applaud Breast Cancer Action's goal - let's put pressure on industry to eliminate toxins in products and reduce the harmful environmental impact of their products - but attacking only those companies that support breast cancer research seems to me to be the wrong way to go about it. 

“No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.” Edmund Burke
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 11:20AM LauraGTO wrote:

"However, sometimes you have to start at the bottom and work your way up...if we're successful at getting Yoplait to stop using rBGH's, others will follow. It's a basic theory known as...competition." That wasn't a quote from BCA...that was my own "quote". And I'll add: You have to start somewhere.

You'd better believe that they're talking about it in their boardroom now, questioning whether they should continue this program next year. Yoplait should be in the boardroom talking about ELIMINATING rBGH's. They would get a heck of a lot more publicity, POSITIVE publicity if they stopped using rBGH's.

I don't agree or disagree with BCA and their methods. I simply don't know enough about them to form an opinion. But what I do know is that Yoplait uses rBGH's in their products...PERIOD. That's all that I'm concerned about.

With hope there are possibilities. Dx 7/2005, ILC, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 2, 1/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 11:59AM - edited Sep 25, 2008 12:05PM by Margerie

I do pick on Yoplait because they manipulate breast cancer FOR A PROFIT.  If they were really interested in breast cancer issues, they would donate without obligation and they would remove rBGH and market that instead of the lid crap. 

A quote from an informative article:

A cynic might note that if corporations really want to help in the fight against breast cancer, they could just make donations to the cause without forcing people to buy anything. To attract consumer attention, companies could advertise their donations on the product ("We gave money to X cause!"), or contribute money for every special label product sold, regardless of whether the label is sent back to the company. It is not as though they are unable to track sales.

Yoplait Yogurt, a subsidiary of General Mills, is most onerous in how they determine the amount they will donate to their cause, the Susan B. Komen Foundation, at the end of the year. As Sue D. complains on her blog, Red Stapler:

"I appreciate the fact that you want to help in the fight against breast cancer. The pink yogurt lids are very cute.

I will not, however, be saving the lids, rinsing them, collecting them, and sending them to you so you can donate a dime apiece to fighting cancer.

I figure I eat about 5 Yoplait yogurts a month. That's $6 per year if I collect lids for a whole year.

I know you're trying to be good corporate citizens, but can you just gimme a break and send the Susan G. Komen Foundation a check for $6 instead of waiting for my grubby, sour-milk-smelling lids?

I think you're just being petty if you can't agree to that."

It is more than pettiness, however. Companies like Yoplait rely on the fact that women will buy their yogurt to help the Susan B. Komen Foundation and then forget to send in their lids. In fact, Yoplait heavily promotes the "Save Lids to Save Lives" campaign in a thinly veiled effort to get women to buy more Yoplait, and to pressure their friends and family to do the same. "There's strength in numbers, so rally your friends to help," the website reads. "You want to tap into the people in your life as a resource. And we've got tools and tips to help you motivate them to collect more lids. It's our small way to thank you for your extra effort." Their tips for soaking your loved ones include organizing "just about any event you can come up with," including "a bake sale or an art show" and charging "pink Yoplait lids instead of cash." The tools include downloadable posters women can display to guilt co-workers, friends, and family into buying Yoplait and bringing in the lids for collection.

I am just sick of corporations exploiting breast cancer for profit.  Yoplait donates 10 cents for every pink yogurt lid mailed back to the company. It would take four lids just to cover the price of the stamp.  One person would have to eat 3 cups of yogurt a day for 4 months (and then collect and mail the lids) for Yoplait to donate $36.  I just mail my check to Komen directly.

Sorry to disappoint.

Are we there yet? Dx 10/4/2005, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 5/19 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 12:09PM Beesie wrote:

Laura, are you not equally concerned about all the other products out there that use rBGH milk in the production of their products?  Why not pick on them?  They aren't doing anything for breast cancer research - why try to hurt the one company in the industry that at least is doing something?  Or at least, include Yoplait on a list along with all the others. Here's a website that lists the brands that are rBGH free.  http://www.nwrage.org/downloads/ORPFSR_rbghConsumerGuide.pdf  Not many, are there?

And here are two other thoughts about competition: 

  • BCA have a campaign against Yoplait.  This reduces Yoplait's sales, profit and market share.  It also reduces the number of pink lids submitted and as a result Yoplait only donate the minimum $500k to Komen. Yoplait is hurt, breast cancer research is hurt, Dannon and the other brands (who don't donate to BC research and who do have rBGH milk in their products) win. 
  • BCA have a campaign against Yoplait.  Yoplait renegotiate with their suppliers to eliminate the use of rBGH milk in their products.  By doing this, they incur a significant increase in their cost of goods, which results in an increase in the price of their product to consumers.  Dannon and the other brands, who have not been targetted by BCA, continue to use rBGH milk (since it has not been banned) and are able to maintain a lower price.  Yoplait lose sales, profit and market share. Because of the higher price, fewer women buy Yoplait and fewer lids are donated.  Yoplait is hurt, breast cancer research is hurt, Dannon and the other brands win.

Wouldn't it be a whole lot more effective - and much better ultimately for those of us concerned about the use of rBGH - if the industry as a whole was targeted, rather than just one company?  Or if BCA insist on targetting companies that support breast cancer causes, how about if they went with a less damaging approach, saying something like this (these are my words):

In 2008 Yoplait are once again running their highly successful Pink Lid campaign, with the aim to donate up to $1.5 Million to the Susan B. Komen foundation.  To-date they have donated over $10 Million.  We applaud Yoplait for their strong committment to breast cancer research. 

And we ask Yoplait to continue their leadership role by banning rBGHs in their product and by working with the FDA to enact a national ban on rBGH.  rBGHs are found in over XX% of yogurt and dairy products sold in America today, including Dannon... (include long list). rBGH is a synthetic hormone that is unnecessary in the production of these products. As a company concerned about women's health, Yoplait are in a position to make a meaningful change and lead the industry in becoming rBGH free.  We urge them to take action now.  

As they say, you can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.

Margerie,  I couldn't agree more - I too am sick of corporations exploiting breast cancer for profit. But let's look at the hundreds - or is it thousands now? - of pink ribbon campaigns and target those companies where the committment isn't real and contribution is insignificant.  There are so many of those around.  I'd be happy to go up against any of those.  But I have a problem when a company that has made a real meaningful long-term committment is targetted.  To use another common expresssion, that's called "cutting off your nose to spite your face" and that's not usually considered a real smart thing to do.

“No power so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.” Edmund Burke
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 12:11PM Rocktobermom wrote:

What would be really great is if an ORGANIC company would sponsor some awareness!

When life hands you a lemon, ask for some tequila and salt to go with it!
Log in to post a reply

Sep 25, 2008 12:50PM LauraGTO wrote:

That would be great Kelly. Fuze Beverages just donated $650,000 to Komen to become a sponsor...I don't think they're organic, but their drinks don't have high fructose corn syrup or carbs, etc. I'm being interviewed by Fuze on Saturday at the Komen walk...they are featuring me and several other "survivors" for their website/campaign - Heroes for Hope. You should contact them and ask them to include you when they get to your state/city.

With hope there are possibilities. Dx 7/2005, ILC, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 2, 1/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
Log in to post a reply

Sep 26, 2008 03:46PM oldlady wrote:

You know,pink packaging only just made it onto my radar on my most recent trip to the supermarket.  I never noticed it before. I am embarrassed to say that I did buy something not on the list because it did have the ribbon.  Is there a chart somewhere that says exactly how much $ per product is being sent ie the 10 cents per yoghurt cup? My store sells ind.size Yoplaits for 50 cents so I guess wholesale from the manufacturer to the store is somewhere around 30 cents.  That would be 33% of Yoplait's wholesale price (10/30) going to BC so that actually seems generous.

I don't eat yogurt but my family does.  Do all major dairy product makers use the rBGH?

Page 1 of 1 (13 results)