We are 207,417 members in 81 forums discussing 149,525 topics.

Help with Abbreviations

All TopicsForum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, Study Results → Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 21, 2017 12:31AM - edited Nov 21, 2017 12:35AM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Page 12 of 12 (357 results)

Posts 331 - 357 (357 total)

Log in to post a reply

Jun 4, 2018 12:54PM Rubytoos wrote:

I posted this on another thread and then found this one. Apologize if it is old news. From a Guardian article published today:

"A woman with advanced breast cancer which had spread around her body has been completely cleared of the disease by a groundbreaking therapy that harnessed the power of her immune system to fight the tumours.

It is the first time that a patient with late-stage breast cancer has been successfully treated by a form of immunotherapy that uses the patient's own immune cells to find and destroy cancer cells that have formed in the body.

Judy Perkins, an engineer from Florida, was 49 when she was selected for the radical new therapy after several rounds of routine chemotherapy failed to stop a tumour in her right breast from growing and spreading to her liver and other areas. At the time, she was given three years to live.

Doctors who cared for the woman at the US National Cancer Institute in Maryland said Perkins's response had been "remarkable": the therapy wiped out cancer cells so effectively that she has now been free of the disease for two years."

The complete article can be read here: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jun/04/do...


Log in to post a reply

Jun 4, 2018 09:17PM Kanga_Roo wrote:

Thanks April, wonderful news for the treatment of cancer... I hope they get plenty of funding to continue their research ThumbsUp

Dx 1/24/2018, IDC, Left, 5cm, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, Grade 3, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 2/11/2018 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy 2/15/2018 Kisqali
Log in to post a reply

Jun 5, 2018 02:57AM LilacBlue wrote:

I cheered in the car driving home when listening the news of Judy Perkins successful immunotherapy broke on BBC radio. So many dying for a cure..could this be it?

Nothing is ever the same as they said it was. It's what I've never seen before that I recognise. - Diane Arbus Dx 4/13/2012, DCIS/IDC, 1cm, Stage IB, Grade 2, 0/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 6/12/2012 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): DIEP flap, Nipple reconstruction
Log in to post a reply

Jun 5, 2018 10:19PM Lumpie wrote:

New Immunotherapy Treatment Removes All Tumors In Woman With Advanced Metastatic Breast Cancer

https://www.forbes.com/sites/victoriaforster/2018/...


"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 5, 2018 11:38PM - edited Jun 6, 2018 10:24AM by TectonicShift


I talked to my oncologist about this today. He said her case is unusual and she's kind of an anomaly because she had SO MANY detectable mutations in her cancer that the researchers had a lot to work with in terms of potential targets to attack with engineered T-cells.

"Out of the 62 genetic abnormalities in this patient, only four were potential lines of attack."

She was lucky. Most breast cancer patients don't have that many detectable mutations.

That's not to say that it isn't great news and could lead to improved immunotherapy options for many more patients. I was very excited and happy to read it and super psyched for her. But I think it's important to understand she is maybe not a typical patient (according to my oncologist).

It's probably why she was chosen to receive this experimental treatment. She was a particularly great candidate.



Log in to post a reply

Jun 6, 2018 02:47AM LilacBlue wrote:

Thanks for the insights TectonicShift.

Nothing is ever the same as they said it was. It's what I've never seen before that I recognise. - Diane Arbus Dx 4/13/2012, DCIS/IDC, 1cm, Stage IB, Grade 2, 0/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 6/12/2012 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): DIEP flap, Nipple reconstruction
Log in to post a reply

Jun 6, 2018 03:32PM Rubytoos wrote:

A different article on this subject that went into greater detail on the study said that a handful of people responded--it was something like 15% of the study population--which admittedly is not huge, but encouraging nonetheless. I very much believe that there are some amazing breakthroughs on the horizon. So I think it is definitely worth cheering about :) I did, too.

Log in to post a reply

Jun 8, 2018 04:23PM Lumpie wrote:

ASCO 2018: Elevated Serum PD-L1 May Identify Patients With HER2–Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Would Benefit From the Addition of a Checkpoint Inhibitor

https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/69050/67/13/?elsc...

....levated pretreatment serum PD-L1 was associated with a shorter overall but not progression-free survival with trastuzumab treatment. Immune evasion by the tumor may reduce the effectiveness of trastuzumab therapy.

"There appears to be a subgroup of patients with HER2–positive metastatic breast cancer with high serum PD-L1 levels who do less well on trastuzumab treatment," Dr. Lipton said

"Going forward, "he added, "it would be interesting to see how these patients respond to therapy with trastuzumab + a PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor."

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 8, 2018 04:31PM Lumpie wrote:

ASCO 2018: Shorter Trastuzumab Treatment for HER2–Positive Breast Cancer Can Be as Effective, With Fewer Cardiac Side Effects

https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/69048/67/13/?elsc...

...half of the women took trastuzumab for 6 months, and the other half took it for 12 months. Women also received chemotherapy (anthracycline-based, taxane-based, or a combination of both). "This new trial shows that a shorter length of treatment can benefit patients just as much as a longer treatment, with less risk of cardiac side effects. This is a win–win for patients with breast cancer who are receiving this common treatment."

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 8, 2018 04:33PM Lumpie wrote:

The Impact of Surgical Excision of the Primary Tumor in Stage IV Breast Cancer on Survival

https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/68992/67/13/?elsc...

  • This meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the survival benefit associated with removal of the primary tumor among patients with stage IV breast cancer. Based on 19 retrospective studies, the pooled hazard ratio for overall survival following excision of the primary tumor was 0.65. However, pooled analysis of three prospective randomized trials showed a pooled hazard ratio of 0.85 associated with primary tumor excision.
  • Based on these results, the study authors do not recommend routine resection of the primary tumor in stage IV breast cancer.
  • For those with a long life expectancy, physicians could discuss ... it with these patients, put forward surgery as a therapy choice and perform the operation under deliberation.
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 8, 2018 04:36PM Lumpie wrote:

Cancer May Contribute to Diabetes Risk

https://www.healio.com/hematology-oncology/gastroi...

A study in JAMA Oncology showed that patients with cancer were at an increased risk for subsequent type 2 diabetes, with the highest diabetes risk detected in the first two years after cancer diagnosis. Researchers followed 524,089 individuals in South Korea with no history of diabetes or cancer for up to 10 years, and they found the strongest association between pancreatic cancer and diabetes, followed by kidney, liver, gall bladder, lung, blood, breast, stomach and thyroid cancers.

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 9, 2018 01:05AM marijen wrote:

What breast cancer looks like on a mammogram


https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322068.p...


Log in to post a reply

Jun 9, 2018 03:38PM Lumpie wrote:

Cardiac Structure Injury After Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/68593/56?elsca1=e...

  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation on specific cardiac segments in 456 women who underwent radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer and then later experienced a major coronary event. Of women with left ventricular (LV) injury, 243 had left-sided breast cancer and 171 had right-sided breast cancer (ratio of left vs right, 1.42), reflecting the higher typical LV radiation doses in left-sided cancer (average dose left-sided, 8.3 Gy; average dose right-sided, 0.6 Gy). For women with coronary artery disease, the ratios of left-sided versus right-sided RT for six individual coronary artery segments were estimated.
  • Higher radiation doses were strongly associated with more frequent injury to individual LV and coronary artery segments, suggesting the radiosensitivity of all cardiac segments and indicating the need to minimize radiation doses to all segments.
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 11, 2018 11:32AM Lumpie wrote:

Researchers identify racial differences in breast cancer immune microenvironment

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180604/Researc...

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have identified significant differences in the immune microenvironment of breast cancer tumors between African-American and white women, shedding light on the ways in which race can influence cancer development and outcomes.

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 11, 2018 11:34AM Lumpie wrote:

Study: Breast cancer survivors do not receive recommended level of screening after surgery

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180524/Study-B...

Breast cancer survivors are not getting the recommended level of screening, post-surgery, according to a newly-published study in JNCCN – Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. {the study} looked at the post-surgery mammography rates for women with health insurance. While NCCN Guidelines® recommend annual mammograms for early-detection of disease recurrence; this study found that even women who remained insured were less likely to meet that standard, as they became long-term survivors.

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 11, 2018 11:37AM Lumpie wrote:

Study: Few men undergo genetic testing despite high risk of breast cancer

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180601/Study-F...

It's well-known that women with BRCA are at a very high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Less known is the fact that men with these mutations also are at risk of breast cancer and other cancers. A study published in April in JAMA Oncology finds that few men are screened for these genetic mutations and the researchers strongly suggest that they be screened.

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 11, 2018 11:44AM Lumpie wrote:

New guideline for HER2 testing in breast cancer benefits patients and clinicians

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180531/New-gui...

"... Notably, the 2018 Focused Update addresses uncommon clinical scenarios and improves clarity, particularly for infrequent HER2 test results that are of uncertain biologic or clinical significance.... a growing body of clinical outcomes literature and survey data enables us to recommend how to best evaluate some of the less common patterns in HER2 results emerging from ISH,"

{Rather technical but will be relevant for/of interest to some...}

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 11, 2018 11:46AM Lumpie wrote:

Mismatch Between Cardiac Risk and Imaging Practices in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/68595/56?elsca1=e...

  • The purpose of this population-based retrospective cohort study was to assess pre-chemotherapy cardiac imaging practices in relation to patients' heart failure (HF) risk in 18,444 women (median age, 55) receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Women who received anthracyclines without trastuzumab underwent imaging more frequently if they had additional HF risk factors (73.3% vs 62.6%; P < .001). The 5-year incidence of a major adverse cardiac event (MACE) was two to six times higher in patients with HF risk factors across all treatment regimens. Patients with HF risk factors who received anthracyclines without trastuzumab had a higher 5-year incidence of MACE (4.5%) than patients without HF risk factors who received trastuzumab without anthracyclines (2.6%). However, cardiac imaging was performed less frequently in the former group (73.3% vs 93.6%; P < .001). Logistic regression indicated that most variation in baseline imaging was related to chemotherapy regimen followed by physician-level factors. The odds of imaging were doubled with female physicians. Patient-specific factors, including HF risk factors, made minimal contribution to variation in imaging.
  • The authors concluded that baseline cardiac imaging was driven by chemotherapy regimen rather than HF risk. This risk–imaging mismatch should be an impetus to reconsider current cardiac imaging practices in patients who receive chemotherapy for breast cancer.
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 15, 2018 09:00PM - edited Jun 15, 2018 09:01PM by Lumpie

Long-Term Survival in Trastuzumab-Treated Patients With HER2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer

https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/68104/67/13/?elsc...

  • This retrospective study included 4177 women with HER2+ metastatic breast cancer who initiated trastuzumab and was designed to assess real-world treatment patterns in women surviving 5 years or longer. Of these women, 1082 survived at least 5 years. After a median follow-up of 9.4 years, 36% of long-term survivors died. Of long-term survivors, 85% had a break from HER2 therapy that lasted a median of 30.4 months.
  • Additional research is warranted to determine the effects of long-term treatment and to identify patients who may safely discontinue HER2 therapy.
{Getting any kind of statistics is pretty huge...}
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 20, 2018 02:42PM marylark wrote:

An antibody that has shrunk tumors (including breast) in mouse models while causing no damage to surrounding tissue.

https://ccr.cancer.gov/news/article/antibody-linked-drug-shrinks-various-types-of-tumors-in-preclinical-study

Dx 5/1/2015, IDC, Right, 5cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 5/13/2015 Taxol (paclitaxel) Chemotherapy 8/12/2015 AC Dx 4/2017, Stage IV, metastasized to bone Targeted Therapy Afinitor (everolimus) Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine) Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole)
Log in to post a reply

Jun 20, 2018 04:49PM ksusan wrote:

www.medscape.com

ASCO Endorses Some Complementary Therapies in Breast Cancer

Roxanne Nelson, BSN, RN

June 20, 2018

Many cancer patients use alternative medicine, including supplements, massage therapy, yoga, and accupuncture, while undergoing conventional cancer care. Such therapies are usually acceptable, but patients must be discuss such therapies with their oncologist, because interactions may occur.

That appears to be the take-home message from the recent move by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) to endorse new guidelines issued by the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO).

The ASCO endorsement was published online June 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The SIO had produced an evidence-based guideline on the use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment for the management of a variety of symptoms and adverse effects. An ASCO expert panel, cochaired by Gary H. Lyman, MD, MPH, codirector of the Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, and Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, director of the Integrative Medicine Program at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, reviewed the guidelines.

The panel determined that the recommendations in the 2017 SIO guideline "are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence." ASCO endorsed them with a few added discussion points.

"We know that vast the majority of cancer patients, particularly breast cancer patients, are using some type of alternative medicines," Lyman said in an interview. "They may be taking supplements, doing yoga, getting massage therapy or acupuncture, but most doctors don't talk about it. They don't ask about it, and the patient doesn't offer the information."

Lyman estimates that 60% to 80% of breast cancer patients use some type of alternative therapy, but such therapies are not entered into the medical record. That generally is not too much a cause of concern, because most of these approaches are relatively safe, he noted. "But occasionally, there may be some interaction with a supplement and standard medicine," he said.

He told Medscape Medical News, "The biggest fear is that a patient is going to stop using a known effective conventional medicine and use one of the alternative approaches instead.

The biggest fear is that a patient is going to stop using a known effective conventional medicine and use one of the alternative approaches instead. Dr Gary Lyman

"That's why we want to make sure that the doctor and patient are discussing them, the doctor knows what the patient is doing and discusses the subject in a nonjudgmental way, and then encourages the patient to report any problems or side effects they might have," he explained.

It is also important that oncologists reassure patients that they can continue to receive their regular cancer treatment along with these alternative approaches.

Review of Recent Literature

The ASCO guidelines are an endorsement of a guideline from a much smaller organization, explained Lyman. "The SIO had approached ASCO about this, and they had done a really deep review of the available literature on these therapies," he said. "ASCO formed a panel, and we did our own search and added several studies that had come out since the other work had been completed."

ASCO used a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system to assign a grade to each therapy, as applied to a specific clinical outcome. Grades A and B indicate that a therapy is recommended for a particular indication; grade C indicates that more evidence is needed or that the net benefit is small; grades D and H indicate that a therapy is not recommended for a particular indication; and grade I indicates that the evidence is inconclusive.

Lyman noted that the ASCO panel supported almost all of the recommendations in the SIO guidelines. "Some had sufficient evidence to recommend them, and for some, there wasn't much evidence, but they didn't incur any harm, and some approaches had no evidence," he said.

Key Recommendations

Some of their key recommendations are as follows:

  • Acute radiation skin reaction — aloe vera and hyaluronic acid cream should not be recommended for improving acute radiation skin reaction (grade D).
  • Anxiety and stress reduction — meditation (grade A), yoga (grade B), and music therapy (grade B) are recommended for reducing anxiety. Stress management is recommended for reducing anxiety during treatment; longer group programs are likely better than self-administered home programs or shorter programs (grade B). Acupuncture, massage, and relaxation can be considered for reducing anxiety (grade C).
  • Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting — acupressure (grade B), electroacupuncture (grade B), ginger (grade C), and relaxation (grade C) can be considered as an addition to antiemetic drugs to control nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy. Glutamine should not be recommended for improving nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy (grade D).
  • Depression and mood disturbance — meditation, particularly mindfulness-based stress reduction (grade A), relaxation (grade A), and yoga (grade B) are recommended for treating mood disturbance and depressive symptoms. Massage (grade B) and music therapy (grade B) are recommended for improving mood disturbance.
  • Fatigue — hypnosis and ginseng can be considered for improving fatigue during treatment (grade C). Acupuncture and yoga can be considered for improving posttreatment fatigue (grade C). Acetyl-L-carnitine and guarana should not be recommended for improving fatigue during treatment (grade D).
  • Lymphedema — low-level laser therapy, manual lymphatic drainage, and compression bandaging can be considered for improving lymphedema (grade C).
  • Neuropathy — acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with breast cancer because of the potential for harm (grade H).
  • Pain — acupuncture, healing touch, hypnosis, and music therapy can be considered for the management of pain (grade C).
  • Quality of Life — meditation (grade A) and yoga (grade B) are recommended for improving quality of life. Acupuncture, mistletoe, qigong, reflexology, and stress management can be considered for improving quality of life (grade C).
  • Sleep Disturbance — gentle yoga can be considered for improving sleep (grade C).
  • Vasomotor/hot flashes — acupuncture can be considered for improving hot flashes (grade C). Soy is not recommended for hot flashes because of lack of effect (grade D).

"Our hope is that this will help disseminate this good information, break down barriers, and open up dialogs between patient and doctor," Lyman said. "Hopefully, patients will have improvements in their outcomes."

All funding was provided by ASCO. Dr Lyman has relationships with Generex Biotechnology, Halozyme, G1 Therapeutics, Coherus Biosciences, and Amgen (Inst); several coauthors have also disclosed relationships with industry, as noted in the original article.

J Clin Oncol. Published online June 11, 2018. Full text

Medscape Medical News © 2018

Cite this article: ASCO Endorses Some Complementary Therapies in Breast Cancer - Medscape - Jun 20, 2018.

Mutant uprising quashed. Dx 1/2015, IDC, Right, Stage IIA, 1/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 1/2015, DCIS, Left, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/2 nodes Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast Chemotherapy Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel)
Log in to post a reply

Jun 20, 2018 05:34PM Lumpie wrote:

Tumor Site and Breast Cancer Prognosis

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/68994/56?elsca1=e...

  • This registry study explored the association between tumor site and prognosis among patients with breast cancer. Tumors from the lower-outer quadrant were associated with a lower risk of death (HR, 0.64); tumors with overlapping regions were associated with a higher risk of death (HR, 1.28).
  • These results suggest that the site of the primary tumor is relevant to prognosis of patients with breast cancer.
Published in Oncology June 19, 2018
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

Jun 20, 2018 05:36PM Lumpie wrote:

Tucatinib With Capecitabine and Trastuzumab in Advanced HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/68671/56?elsca1=e...

  • This open-label phase IB study evaluated the activity and safety of tucatinib in combination with capecitabine and trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer, both in the presence and absence of brain metastases. The objective response rate was 83% with tucatinib and capecitabine; 40% with tucatinib and trastuzumab; and 61% with tucatinib, capecitabine, and trastuzumab.
  • The safety profile of tucatinib combined with capecitabine and trastuzumab was considered to be acceptable and demonstrated initial activity.
Published in Oncology May 31, 2018
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/13/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
Log in to post a reply

22 hours ago Becca953 wrote:

Read a couple of very interesting interviews/articles at OncLive. For Her 2 one mentioned after analysis Perjeta is actually more beneficial with Herceptin for hormone negative bc, while Neratinib is more beneficial for hormone positive. Although, they are still trying to figure out how to sequence the therapies, either concurrently or consecutively.

The other fascinating interview was regarding breast cancer stem cells and how they really should be the target for all breast cancers. Apparently the University of Michigan has 9 early Stage 1 trials focusing on treatment from this angle. It is fairly new science that was only realized in 2003 and took another 10 years for them to figure out how to approach it.

Dx 12/20/2017, IDC, Right, <1cm, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2+ Dx 12/20/2017, DCIS, Right, 4cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, ER+/PR- Surgery 1/30/2018 Mastectomy: Right Targeted Therapy 3/5/2018 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 3/5/2018 Taxol (paclitaxel)
Log in to post a reply

9 hours ago marijen wrote:

ONEOME pharmacogenomic testing for medicines

Does anyone know anything about Oneome - Right Med?


https://oneome.com/


Log in to post a reply

4 hours ago Lisey wrote:

Majijen, I used Kailos Genetics and it was truly helpful.  It showed me I was a Met /Met (double allele) and what that means for BC and me.  I also showed me I was an ultra rapid processor of Tamoxifen.  I highly recommend. 

Oncotype =20, ER 95%, PR 5%, ki67= 30%, Mammoprint = Low, Blueprint = Luminal A!!!! TEs= Iron Bra of Death - not worth all the complications for foobs that I'll never feel. Flat and fealess now. Dx 5/11/2016, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 6/1/2016 Lymph node removal: Sentinel Surgery 6/14/2016 Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Surgery 7/7/2016 Mastectomy: Left, Right Hormonal Therapy 7/14/2016 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
Log in to post a reply

3 hours ago marijen wrote:

Lisey, I really like my new name, I think I'll change it. I went to the site and there's a list of tests and prices. Did you need to go through your doctor? The Oneome you can do on your own. It's $349 for everything. Here's the link for the Kailos https://www.kailosgenetics.com/buy-gene-test

Thanks Lisey. Anyone else?

Page 12 of 12 (357 results)