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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 21, 2017 06:31AM - edited Nov 21, 2017 06:35AM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Page 28 of 29 (853 results)

Posts 811 - 840 (853 total)

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Jan 23, 2019 06:15PM - edited Jan 23, 2019 06:16PM by hartrish

kangaroo roo: great resource. I even sent it to my MO.

Dx 3/9/2015, ILC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/5 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- (FISH) Dx 3/9/2015, ILC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 4/15/2015 Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): DIEP flap; Reconstruction (right): DIEP flap Chemotherapy 7/8/2015 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 8/29/2017, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Chemotherapy 9/8/2017 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Gemzar (gemcitabine)
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Jan 24, 2019 06:42AM Chemokaze wrote:

Is it possible to prevent breast cancer metastasis?

Study reveals how blood vessels in the bone marrow protect dormant tumor cells, suggests a way to kill them in their sleep

https://www.fredhutch.org/en/news/center-news/2019/01/prevent-cancer-metastasis-ghajar-study.html
10/2018: NEAD; 7/2018: Onward to Verzenio, Zometa, Faslodex, & CyberKnife to single met to L4 spine. Dx 9/1996, IDC, Left, Stage IB, Grade 3, 0/21 nodes, ER+/PR+ Dx 5/2016, IDC, Right, Stage IIIC, Grade 2, 14/21 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2018, Stage IV, metastasized to bone
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Jan 26, 2019 07:15AM Lumpie wrote:

Predictive and Prognostic Value of Circulating Blood Lymphocyte Subsets in MBC
  • The aims of the present study were to explore the effects of circulating blood lymphocyte subsets on the survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer and to evaluate their predictive and prognostic value. The clinical data of 482 patients with metastatic breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed, and patients were grouped according to molecular types of breast cancer.
  • Higher circulating levels of CD4+ and CD3+ at first diagnosis of HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer were significantly associated with worse survival outcomes. Low levels of plasma CD4+ and CD3+ were associated with increased anti-HER2 benefit in patients with HER2-positive disease.
  • https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/78499/67/13/?elsc...
  • https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/c...
  • doi.org/10.1002/cam4.1891
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Jan 27, 2019 08:19PM - edited Jan 27, 2019 08:19PM by Salamandra

Antioxidant supplementation and breast cancer prognosis in postmenopausal women undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy

(The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, nqy223, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqy223 Published:21 January 2019)

ABSTRACT

Background

There is a paucity of information on the prevalence of dietary supplement use in breast cancer survivors. Only a few studies have examined the impact of dietary supplements, particularly antioxidants, on breast cancer prognosis and the results are inconclusive.

Objective

We examined pre- and postdiagnosis use of supplements in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors in Germany and investigated associations between postdiagnosis use of antioxidants and other supplements, and prognosis (total and breast cancer mortality, and recurrence-free survival) both overall and in women who received chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Design

Data from 2223 postmenopausal women diagnosed with nonmetastatic breast cancer from the population-based Mamma Carcinoma Risk Factor Investigation (MARIE) study were used. Women were interviewed at recruitment in 2002–2005 and again in 2009 and followed-up until 30 June 2015. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to estimate HRs and corresponding 95% CIs.

Results

Pre- and postdiagnosis supplement use was reported by 36% and 45% of the women, respectively. There were 240 deaths (134 from breast cancer) and 200 breast cancer recurrences after a median follow-up time of 6.0 y after the 2009 re-interview. After adjusting for relevant confounders, concurrent antioxidant use with chemotherapy or radiation therapy among 1940 women was associated with increased risk of total mortality (HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01, 2.66) and worsened recurrence-free survival (HR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.26, 2.68). Overall postdiagnosis supplement use was not associated with breast cancer prognosis.

Conclusions

Antioxidant use during chemotherapy or radiation therapy was associated with worsened breast cancer prognosis in postmenopausal women. There was no overall association between postdiagnosis supplement use and breast cancer prognosis. Results from our study align with the current recommendation to possibly avoid the use of antioxidants during chemotherapy or radiation therapy.


Dx at 39. 1.8cm. Oncotype 9. Dx 9/19/2018, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 10/18/2018 Lumpectomy; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy 12/3/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Jan 27, 2019 11:54PM Lumpie wrote:

Pharma Making $ Hand Over Fist on Oncology Drugs Some agents continued to make billions after market exclusivity

"Blame for the hefty price tags on cancer therapies is often pinned on research and development (R&D), but on average pharmaceutical companies made over 10 times what these agents cost to develop, a new analysis found.

For the 99 FDA-approved oncology drugs with available sales data, these agents generated a median cumulative revenue of $14.50 for every $1 spent on R&D through the end of 2017...

the revenue-to-cost ratio was even greater for some blockbuster agents...{including} Trastuzumab (Herceptin): $31.20

...a recent WHO report on cancer drug pricing that found pharmaceutical companies' pricing strategies were largely "based on commercial goals" rather than the clinical value of a given agent.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/ot...


"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Jan 28, 2019 08:49AM Lumpie wrote:

Association Between MRI Background Parenchymal Enhancement and Future Risk of Primary Breast Cancer
  • The goal of this study was to evaluate comparative associations of breast MRI background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and mammographic breast density with subsequent breast cancer risk among 4247 women.
  • BPE is associated with future invasive breast cancer risk, independent of breast density. BPE should be considered for risk-prediction models in women undergoing breast MRI.
  • Journal of Clinical Oncology
  • https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/78448/56?elsca1=e...
  • http://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.18.00378
  • DOI: 10.1200/JCO.18.00378
  • PMID: 30625040
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Jan 29, 2019 05:07AM - edited Feb 3, 2019 06:59AM by marijen

This Post was deleted by marijen.
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Jan 29, 2019 05:45AM Kimchee wrote:

marijen Hope this true but I'll believe it when I see it


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Jan 29, 2019 06:52AM Traveltext wrote:

A word of caution here.

"Morad said that so far, the company has concluded its first exploratory mice experiment, which inhibited human cancer cell growth and had no effect at all on healthy mice cells, in addition to several in-vitro trials. AEBi is on the cusp of beginning a round of clinical trials which could be completed within a few years and would make the treatment available in specific cases."

This prediction is the result of mice studies, they are not saying which cancers they think they can cure (remember bc has many variations) and they are not saying when they think this procedure would be widely available.


NED breast and prostate cancer. More on Male BC

Dx 03/14, IBC, Lgth. 2cm, Stge IIIB, Gde 2B, ER+/PR+, HER2- ; FEC x3, Taxol x3; Mx & 2/23 nodes; Rads x 33; now on tamoxofin.

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Jan 30, 2019 03:05AM - edited Jan 30, 2019 03:12AM by hhfp

They are taking the "throw everything in to kill the cancer once and for all" approach. Some MOs would do that but the risk is that if/when the cancer returns, it may be untreatable. Others MOs rather use the drugs one by one to try and extend the life of the patient knowing that eventually, the cancer does not respond to further treatments.

As others stated, if this is really a cure (like cure for HIV as mentioned) and cost less than current treatments, that's be super awesome!

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Jan 30, 2019 03:58AM marijen wrote:

I wonder if using the drugs one by one isn’t simply making the cancer stronger.

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Jan 30, 2019 04:36AM hhfp wrote:

Correct, that's the view point of the MO who believe it is better to throw everything at the cancer. And also the reason that some drug combo are much more effective when used together instead of alone.

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Feb 1, 2019 07:32PM Gudrun wrote:

Engineered Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium overcomes limitations of anti-bacterial immunity in bacteria-mediated tumor therapy

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2162402X.2017.1382791

Daughter dx at 28: Dx 8/2015, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone), Zoladex (goserelin) Targeted Therapy Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery Mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): TUG flap
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Feb 2, 2019 04:22AM marijen wrote:

The Modern Tradgedy of Fake Cancer Cure

By MATTHEW HERPER @matthewherper

FEBRUARY 1, 2019

So it happened again. An underreported story about a half-baked advance in cancer medicine caught fire and scorched its way through social media, onto network TV, and into the minds of millions of people.

To start, no. There won't be "a complete cure for cancer" in a year's time, as the chairman of a small Israeli biotechnology firm predicted to the Jerusalem Post. The claim, absurd on its face, was particularly frustrating to those who work in medicine and drug development because it seemed so obvious there was not enough evidence to make it.

It doesn't take a lot of complicated biology to understand why. You simply need the information contained in the Jerusalem Post's article: that the data available so far are from a single study in mice and that they have not been published in a scientific journal.

Saying that most experiments in mice don't translate to human beings doesn't quite get the point across. It's more correct to say that almost none of them do.

According to the Biotechnology Industry Organization, the odds of a medicine being tested in human beings proving safe and effective enough for widespread use are just 1 in 10. Another analysis by MIT economists gives slightly better odds, of 1 in 7. But both groups agree that the chances of success for cancer drugs are far worse than the norm: 1 in 20, according to BIO, and 1 in 30 according to the otherwise more optimistic MIT group.

Related:

So good it hurts: Why drug makers looking to replace opioids want to keep some pain in the picture

Stated another way, up to 97 percent of cancer drugs fail. What's more, the Israeli company, Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies Ltd. (AEBi), is at an earlier stage in the development of its drug, a point at which its odds are still lower. The Jerusalem Post article says that the company has finished its first experiment in mice, but that it hopes to begin clinical trials that could be completed in a few years.

Another useful number on experience and speed: Loxo Oncology, which is being purchased by Eli Lilly for $8 billion, got its first medicine from mouse studies to approval quickly. Quickly, in this case, is five years.

If you have this background, the original quotes in the Jerusalem Post article sound like an entrepreneur trying to get attention for a technology he believes in. The Jerusalem Post quotes Dan Aridor, the chairman of AEBi, as saying: "Our cancer cure will be effective from day one, will last a duration of a few weeks and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than most other treatments on the market. Our solution will be both generic and personal." Plenty of entrepreneurs hope that. But reality is very, very hard. In another interview with The Times of Israel, the company's chief executive gave somewhat less enthusiastic quotes.

That shouldn't mask the fantastic progress being made with cancer drugs. A simple example: Jimmy Carter, the humanitarian and former U.S. president, is alive thanks in large part to a drug called Keytruda, made by Merck, that primes the immune system to attack tumors.

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But part of the problem is that even in cases like Carter's, this amazing progress comes with complications. Not everyone has such an amazing response to these cutting-edge treatments. In first-line melanoma, a quarter of patients who get the drug will still die. But in such a hard-to-treat disease, that's a great result.

Life is complicated, and so are cancer treatments. Cancer is older than human beings. Scientists have found dinosaurs with metastatic tumors. It's simply not likely we're going to outsmart all cancers with a single treatment, without drawbacks.

That's the seductive message that sold here, though. It's what Glenn Beck tweeted: "A TOTAL cure for cancer. Cheap, quick, no side effects." It's what led the Drudge Report to link to the story, saying: "Israeli Scientists Think They Found Cancer Cure…" It's what led to coverage on myriad other news sources, including local news.

Jonathan Swift noted that a lie can traverse the world while the truth limps behind it 300 years ago. In the age of social media, the problem seems as though it has gotten worse: think the rise of Theranos, or believing that Jack Andraka's high school science fair project was a breakthrough. In medicine, this kind of virality means false hopes, dashed dreams, and a whole lot of hype. We are desperate for a solution.

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Feb 3, 2019 06:37AM ShetlandPony wrote:

The downside of inflammatory news about cancer

By Dena Battle

February 1, 2019

https://www.statnews.com/2019/02/01/downside-infla...


2011 Stage I ILC ER+PR+ Her2- 1.5 cm grade 1, ITCs sn . Lumpectomy, radiation, tamoxifen. 2014 Stage IV ILC ER+PR+Her2- grade 2, mets to breast , liver. Taxol NEAD. 2015,2016 Ibrance+letrozole. 2017 Faslodex+Afnitor; Xeloda. 2018 Xeloda NEAD
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Feb 3, 2019 06:56AM Traveltext wrote:

Yes, this was a shocker, one of the worst for a long while.

To quote the author:

If the Jerusalem Post and other news outlets that carried the story had looked beyond their quest for hype, the headline would have been "A theory that might lead to a curative therapy for some cancer patients perhaps in the next decade."

NED breast and prostate cancer. More on Male BC

Dx 03/14, IBC, Lgth. 2cm, Stge IIIB, Gde 2B, ER+/PR+, HER2- ; FEC x3, Taxol x3; Mx & 2/23 nodes; Rads x 33; now on tamoxofin.

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Feb 3, 2019 07:07AM ShetlandPony wrote:

Thanks for posting that quote, Traveltext. Sums it up nicely. (I should have included it. )

2011 Stage I ILC ER+PR+ Her2- 1.5 cm grade 1, ITCs sn . Lumpectomy, radiation, tamoxifen. 2014 Stage IV ILC ER+PR+Her2- grade 2, mets to breast , liver. Taxol NEAD. 2015,2016 Ibrance+letrozole. 2017 Faslodex+Afnitor; Xeloda. 2018 Xeloda NEAD
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Feb 5, 2019 08:09PM Lumpie wrote:

Pfizer's Trastuzumab Biosimilar Noninferior in Two Breast Ca Trials Results similar to branded drug in metastatic, neoadjuvant breast cancer studies

A biosimilar to trastuzumab (Herceptin) demonstrated noninferiority versus the branded drug in a randomized trial of patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer.

Treatment with Pfizer's biosimilar PF-05280014 plus paclitaxel led to objective responses in 62.5% of patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer compared with 66.5% for European-sourced (EU) trastuzumab and the taxane, a difference that met statistical requirements for noninferiority. The two treatment groups had virtually identical progression-free survival (PFS), as reported in the British Journal of Cancer (BJC).

The incidence of grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (irrespective of cause) was 38.1% for patients treated with the biosimilar and 45.5% for the group that received the branded product. No patient in the PF-05280014 group developed antidrug antibodies as compared with 0.89% in the trastuzumab-EU group.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/br...

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41416-018-0340-2

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41416-018-0340-2
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Feb 5, 2019 09:43PM - edited Feb 5, 2019 09:44PM by LovefromPhilly

dang it! I knew that Jerusalem article sounded too good to be true 😤

With Love From Philly Dx 3/25/2017, IDC, Right, 6cm+, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 3, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 4/5/2017 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib)
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Feb 6, 2019 11:57PM marijen wrote:

February 01, 2019 Long-Term Incidence of A-Fib Increased in Women With Breast Cancer Women younger than 60 years have increased short-term, longer-term risk.

HealthDay News — Women with breast cancer have an increased long-term incidence of atrial fibrillation(AF), according to a study published online January 28 in Heart Rhythm.

Maria D'Souza, MD, from Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev-Gentofte in Denmark, and colleagues estimated the long-term incidence of AF in patients with breast cancer identified from 1998 to 2015 using nationwide registries. A total of 74,155 female patients with breast cancer were matched with 222,465 patients from the background population by age and sex.

The researchers observed a correlation for breast cancer with incident AF; the correlation varied between age groups and follow-up time periods. Breast cancer was associated with an increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months and from 6 months to 3 years for patients younger than 60 years (hazard ratios, 2.1 [95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 3.44] and 1.8 [95% confidence interval, 1.38 to 2.35], respectively). Breast cancer was not associated with an increased incidence of AF during the first 6 months but was associated with an increased incidence from 6 months to 3 years for patients older than 60 years (hazard ratios, 1.13 [95% confidence interval, 0.95 to 1.34] and 1.14 [95% confidence interval, 1.05 to 1.25], respectively).

"Our findings should encourage doctors to focus on the risk of AF in patients with recent breast cancer in order to diagnose and treat as early as possible," D'Souza said in a statement.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

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Feb 7, 2019 03:58PM Lumpie wrote:

The Risk of Cardiovascular Hospitalizations After Early-Stage Breast Cancer
  • This matched cohort study was designed to evaluate the risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations after early-stage breast cancer. The 10-year incidence of cardiovascular hospitalization was 10.8% among patients after treatment for early breast cancer compared with a 9.1% incidence among controls. Atherosclerotic diagnoses were more common than heart failure as the reason for hospitalization. Heart failure hospitalization tended to occur among patients with risk factors preceding chemotherapy.
  • Following treatment for early-stage breast cancer, the most common reason for cardiovascular hospitalization was atherosclerotic disease. Most patients with heart failure had risk factors evident prior to chemotherapy, and this may present opportunities for health promotion.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/79331/56?elsca1=e...
Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Published: 31 January 2019

https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djy218


"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Feb 7, 2019 04:00PM Lumpie wrote:

Safety of T-DM1 in Patients With HER2+ Advanced Breast Cancer: Primary Results From the KAMILLA Study Cohort 1
Published in: European Journal of Cancer
  • This phase IIIb study was designed to evaluate the safety of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) for patients with previously treated advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. T-DM1 was found to be tolerable and safe in this setting. Grade ≥3 adverse events occurred in 37.5% of patients, the most common of which were anemia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue. Median progression-free survival was 6.9 months, and median overall survival was 27.2 months.
  • These results are similar to those reported in previous randomized studies and confirm that T-DM1 is safe, effective, and well-tolerated in women with previously treated HER2-positive advanced breast cancer.
March 2019 Volume 109, Pages 92–102
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2018.12.022
"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Feb 7, 2019 04:02PM Lumpie wrote:

Effects of Neratinib on Health-Related Quality-of-Life in Women With HER2-Positive Early-Stage Breast Cancer
Annals of Oncology
  • The authors report health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) data from a phase III trial evaluating neratinib for adjuvant therapy among patients with early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer.
  • Adjuvant neratinib was associated with a transient decrease in HRQoL during the first month of treatment. There were no other meaningful changes in HRQoL.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/79044/56?elsca1=e...

https://academic.oup.com/annonc/advance-article-ab...

https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdz016

Published: 23 January 2019

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Feb 8, 2019 12:37AM marijen wrote:

HER2-Positive Breast Cancer FDA Approval Sought for Adjuvant T-DM1 in High-Risk HER2+ Breast Cancer

Genentech has completed its FDA submission of a supplemental biologics license application for ado-trastuzumab emtansine as an adjuvant treatment for patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer who had residual disease following neoadjuvant therapy.

New Findings Expand Options in Early HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

During a recent OncLive Peer Exchange®, panel members discussed the use of HER2-targeted therapies in patients with early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings.

Margetuximab Improves PFS in Metastatic HER2+ Breast Cancer

Margetuximab in combination with chemotherapy improved progression-free survival compared with trastuzumab and chemotherapy in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer.

HER2+ Breast Cancer Treatment Evolving With New Data, Novel Agents

Erika P. Hamilton, MD, reflects on the latest data in HER2-positive breast cancer and additional therapies moving through the pipeline.

Making Sense of Adjuvant Therapy in HER2+ Breast Cancer

Given recent changes in the treatment paradigm of HER2-positive breast cancer, the expert panelists outline their approaches to selecting adjuvant therapy.

Pathologic Complete Response in HER2+ Breast Cancer

The role of pathologic complete response (PCR) is brought into question by the panel of experts, who reflect on its prognostic value in HER2-positive breast cancer.

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Feb 8, 2019 01:44AM MinusTwo wrote:

Wow Marijen - Thanks. I watched a couple of the discussions & will watch again. Things have really changed for HER2+ since 2014. One article required that I sign in or register to continue past page one. Do you know if you have to be an MD? Or can anyone register?

2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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Feb 8, 2019 07:53AM marijen wrote:

Glad to help MinusTwo. I have a sign in and not a professional. They just want to know who’s reading - patient, researcher, whatever. It’s free.

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Feb 10, 2019 09:10PM Lumpie wrote:

Cristofanilli Explains Precision of Liquid Biopsies in Advanced Breast Cancer

https://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/cristofanil...

In the pivotal SOLAR-1 trial... Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was a major indicator of response to the drug, as it better reflected molecular status of the disease at the time of progression.

"The liquid biopsy is becoming more of a standard of care," said Cristofanilli. "It is very clear we need to use it more and more, as soon as a patient is diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and there is the possibility to obtain a biopsy."

We... asked the question, "Can we identify patients who have worse outcomes in the overall population and in the de novo established disease?" If that was the case, we do have different diseases, because that is the basis of staging.

We are moving from calling this >5 or <5 CTCs to stage IV indolent and stage IV aggressive [disease]. We essentially had demonstrated [in a statistically significant fashion] that >5 is a much worse outcome in patients who have de novo disease and in the overall population. This is for first- and second-line settings, as well as later lines of therapy.

Now, this means a lot; it means that when we try to propose the standard of care a patient for their more aggressive or less aggressive disease, we have to consider them as different biologies. If we try to develop drugs in this space of metastatic disease, we have to at least stratify by CTC levels because these are 2 different diseases with different outcomes. It might take a much longer sample size of patients with indolent disease to show the difference. Also, we tried to connect CTC-high and these more aggressive features with other [characteristics] of the liquid biopsy. We are looking into cfDNA and other mutations. One [set of findings] that we presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium was that patients who had >5 CTC also had more mutations. This is all relevant, because it means that we not only have a prognostic signature, but molecular features that are actionable

"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Feb 11, 2019 08:19PM Lumpie wrote:

Aggressive breast cancer risk elevated with Type 2 diabetes

The risk for developing a "more aggressive" form of breast cancer is higher among women with type 2 diabetes compared with women without diabetes, according to findings published in Diabetes Care.

Use of insulin analogues did not increase risk for more aggressive breast cancers, according to researchers.

The researchers found that tumors were larger among women with type 2 diabetes compared with women without type 2 diabetes (P < .01). In addition, women with type 2 diabetes had more lymph nodes affected (P < .05), a more advanced tumor stage (P < .01) and grade (P < .05) and less frequent instances of a progesterone receptor-negative breast tumor (P < .0001) than women without type 2 diabetes.

https://www.healio.com/endocrinology/diabetes/news...

Overbeek JA, et al. Diabetes Care. 2019;doi:10.2337/dc18-2146.


"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Feb 12, 2019 04:14AM Lumpie wrote:

Statin Drugs to Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Mortality

The benefits of statins on reducing breast cancer recurrence appears to be strongest in younger patients... {researchers} demonstrated a 36% reduction in the risk of breast cancer recurrence in patients taking lipophilic statins...data in aggregate suggest lipophilic statins, and not hydrophilic statins, reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence, which may indicate a role for statins as agents to impede this mortal stage of tumor progression and secondarily implicate a non-cholesterol effect such as direct tumor cell reduction of prenylation or an indirect effect via reduced inflammatory cytokine release. the majority of published data suggest that statins have a mortality benefit in most cancer types.

A meta-analysis by Liu et al. demonstrated a 43% reduction in BCSM in women with breast cancer, which was confined to those taking lipophilic statins.[50] A nationwide cohort study in Finland by Murtola and colleagues demonstrated a 46% and 54% reduction in BCSM for pre- and post-diagnosis statin users, respectively.[51] A nationwide cohort study in the UK by Cardwell et al. demonstrated a 16% reduction in BCSM considering all statins, but a greater reduction in patients taking simvastatin, a lipophilic statin.[52] Finally, a nationwide cohort study in Scotland by McMenamin et al. demonstrated a 15% reduction in BCSM in pre-diagnosis statin users.....data suggest statin usage can reduce cancer-specific mortality. Coupling this with the foregoing data suggesting statins can decrease breast cancer recurrence leads to the conclusion that statins can reduce the percentage of patients who experience relapse after therapy and thereby increase breast cancer survival.

Prospective clinical trials should investigate statin use as adjuvant therapy in breast cancer.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/907711_1

Breast Cancer Res. 2018;20(1)


"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Feb 12, 2019 04:15AM Lumpie wrote:

Robotic Mastectomy in US: Starts, Draws Fire, Stops Potential 'Disaster' or Evolutionary 'Next Step'?

Robotic mastectomy for invasive breast cancer was performed for the first time in the United States last year, but the move toward this surgical approach ground to a halt soon afterward.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/908823#vp_1


"If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right

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