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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 20, 2017 10:31PM - edited Nov 20, 2017 10:35PM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 29, 2019 09:44AM Lumpie wrote:

Pyrotinib or Lapatinib Combined With Capecitabine in HER2–Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer With Prior Taxanes, Anthracyclines, and/or Trastuzumab: A Randomized, Phase II Study

PURPOSE

Pyrotinib, an irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor, showed promising antitumor activity and acceptable tolerability in a phase I trial. We assessed the efficacy and tolerability of pyrotinib versus lapatinib, both in combination with capecitabine, in women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer in an open-label, multicenter, randomized phase II study.

CONCLUSION

In women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer previously treated with taxanes, anthracyclines, and/or trastuzumab, pyrotinib plus capecitabine yielded statistically significant better overall response rate and progression-free survival than lapatinib plus capecitabine in this randomized phase II trial.

https://ascopubs.org/doi/abs/10.1200/JCO.19.00108

DOI: 10.1200/JCO.19.00108 Journal of Clinical Oncology

Published online August 20, 2019.

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 29, 2019 10:36AM - edited Aug 29, 2019 10:37AM by debbew

Regarding proton beam therapy, I was just reading an article a few days ago about carbon ion therapy, which was initiated in the U.S. but is now available only in Asia and Europe.

"Carbon ion therapy is similarly precise [to proton therapy], but because carbon ions are heavier, they deliver more cancer-killing power than protons do. Carbon centers have reported impressive survival rates, particularly for hard-to-treat bone and soft-tissue cancers such as spinal tumors."

https://www.wired.com/story/why-a-promising-potent-cancer-therapy-isnt-used-in-the-us/


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Aug 30, 2019 07:10AM Lumpie wrote:

Hormone Therapy and Breast Cancer: Yes, There Is Risk But how big, and how important for individual women, is thornier question

Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) was tied to increased breast cancer risk in a global study -- but implications for individual patients are less clear.

...those who reported ever using MHT had a 26% higher relative risk for developing breast cancer compared with never-users (RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.24-1.28), reported the Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer.

the findings are definitely concerning, ... "Clinicians must heed the message of this study but also take a rational and comprehensive approach to the management of menopausal symptoms, with careful consideration of the risks and benefits of initiating MHT for each woman."

"This might be dependent on severity of the symptoms, contraindications for MHT (i.e., breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, and stroke), and BMI, and could take into account patient preference," she continued. "For likely candidates, MHT (preferably estrogen alone) should be initiated around the time of natural menopause and ideally limited to 5 years of use."

https://www.medpagetoday.com/obgyn/hrt/81890?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2019-08-30&eun=g1278169d0r&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Headlines%202019-08-30&utm_term=NL_Daily_DHE_Active

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 30, 2019 07:18AM Lumpie wrote:

Positive Breast Cancer Data for PD-1/L1 Inhibitors Higher pCR rate in neoadjuvant setting follows success in metastatic triple-negative disease

Adding a PD-L1 inhibitor to neoadjuvant chemotherapy increased the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), particularly when the immunotherapy was started first, a placebo-controlled trial showed.

Patients who received durvalumab (Imfinzi) in addition to chemotherapy had a pCR rate of 53.4% versus 44.2% with placebo and chemotherapy. The difference did not attain statistical significance, except in a subgroup of patients who started the PD-L1 inhibitor 2 weeks before chemotherapy. In that subgroup, the odds of achieving pCR more than doubled with durvalumab.

The results added to evidence from a previous study that showed significant improvement in pCR with the addition of pembrolizumab (Keytruda) to chemotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed TNBC.

"We now have an approved indication in breast cancer, and I think that represents real progress,"

https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/breastcancer/81895?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2019-08-30&eun=g1278169d0r&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Headlines%202019-08-30&utm_term=NL_Daily_DHE_Active

Primary Source Annals of Oncology

Source Reference: Loibl S, et al "A randomized phase II study investigating durvalumab in addition to an anthracycline taxane-based neoadjuvant therapy in early triple-negative breast cancer: clinical results and biomarker analysis of GeparNuevo study" Ann Oncol 2019; 30: 1279-1288.

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 30, 2019 07:27AM Lumpie wrote:

New clues to the cause of permanent hair loss caused by chemotherapy.

Priming mobilization of hair follicle stem cells triggers permanent loss of regeneration after alkylating chemotherapy

The maintenance of genetic integrity is critical for stem cells to ensure homeostasis and regeneration. Little is known about how adult stem cells respond to irreversible DNA damage, resulting in loss of regeneration in humans. Here, we establish a permanent regeneration loss model using cycling human hair follicles treated with alkylating agents: busulfan followed by cyclophosphamide. We uncover the underlying mechanisms by which hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) lose their pool. In contrast to immediate destructive changes in rapidly proliferating hair matrix cells, quiescent HFSCs show unexpected massive proliferation after busulfan and then undergo large-scale apoptosis following cyclophosphamide. HFSC proliferation is activated through PI3K/Akt pathway, and depletion is driven by p53/p38-induced cell death. RNA-seq analysis shows that HFSCs experience mitotic catastrophe with G2/M checkpoint activation. Our findings indicate that priming mobilization causes stem cells to lose their resistance to DNA damage, resulting in permanent loss of regeneration after alkylating chemotherapy.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11665-0

{This article is extremely technical but the matter will undoubtedly be of interest to some.}
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 30, 2019 11:45AM Lumpie wrote:

Trastuzumab Biosimilar vs Reference Trastuzumab in the Neoadjuvant Setting for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer
  • The authors of this report provide 3-year follow-up data from a phase III study of a trastuzumab biosimilar versus reference trastuzumab in the neoadjuvant management of HER2+ breast cancer. Cardiotoxicity was rare, with similar rates between groups. The 3-year event-free survival was better in the biosimilar group compared with the reference trastuzumab group (91.9% vs 85.2%).
  • The rate of event-free survival at 3 years was better with a trastuzumab biosimilar than with reference trastuzumab, and cardiotoxicity was rare in both cohorts.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/88464/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
https://www.ejcancer.com/article/S0959-8049(19)30423-X/fulltext
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2019.07.015
{It has been noted that this study investigated only one of 5 available biosimilars; nonetheless, it may be reassuring to some that biosimilars are not simply inferior.}
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 30, 2019 11:59AM Lumpie wrote:

Safety and Efficacy of T-DM1 Plus Neratinib in Patients With Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast Cancer
  • The authors of this 3 + 3 dose-escalation study enrolled 27 patients with metastatic HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who had progressed on dual-antibody therapy (trastuzumab, pertuzumab) and a taxane. They were treated across four dose levels of neratinib in combination with ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1). An objective response was evident in 63% of evaluable patients. The responses were deeper and more durable in patients with cell-free DNA ERBB2 amplification. Dose-limiting toxicities included diarrhea and nausea.
  • The recommended phase II dose for neratinib was 160 mg/day for this combination. Loss of the HER2 receptor and high expression of p95HER2 may explain the resistance to HER2 antibodies.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/88518/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.19.00858
DOI: 10.1200/JCO.19.00858 Journal of Clinical Oncology
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 30, 2019 02:08PM Lumpie wrote:

Pyrotinib vs Lapatinib Plus Capecitabine in HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer With Prior Taxanes, Anthracyclines, and/or Trastuzumab
  • The authors of this randomized phase II trial evaluated capecitabine plus either lapatinib or pyrotinib, an irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor, in 128 patients with HER2-positive relapsed or metastatic breast cancer previously treated with taxanes, anthracyclines, and/or trastuzumab. The overall response rate was significantly better with pyrotinib (78.5%) than with lapatinib (57.1%). The median progression-free survival was also superior at 18.1 versus 7 months (HR, 0.36; P<.001) for the pyrotinib and lapatinib arms, respectively.
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Aug 31, 2019 09:07AM Lumpie wrote:

Good News on Nipple-Sparing Breast Surgery Korean study examined recurrence rates

Incidence of breast cancer recurrence in the nipple-areola complex (NAC) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and immediate breast reconstruction was extremely limited over the long term, Korean investigators found, and cancers that did recur did not increase risk of distant metastases or compromise overall survival.

The findings suggest that biological features of the breast cancer tumor should be considered when planning nipple-sparing mastectomy.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/breastcancer/81903?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2019-08-31&eun=g1278169d0r&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Headlines%202019-08-31&utm_term=NL_Daily_DHE_Active

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamasurgery/article-abstract/2749070

Wu Z, Kim H, Lee J, et al. Breast Cancer Recurrence in the Nipple-Areola Complex After Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Invasive Breast Cancer. JAMA Surg. Published online August 28, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2019.2959

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 2, 2019 05:35AM BevJen wrote:

New drug approval by the FDA -- can be used in breast cancer

https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/88121/3/1/?elsca1...


Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/4/2019 Targeted Therapy 7/31/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap
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Sep 2, 2019 09:47AM Lumpie wrote:

{I looked up the article BevJen posted and thought I would add some highlights. Thx BevJen!} FDA Approves Third Oncology Drug That Targets a Key Genetic Driver of Cancer, Rather Than a Specific Type of Tumor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rozlytrek (entrectinib), a treatment for adult and adolescent patients whose cancers have the specific genetic defect, NTRK (neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase) gene fusion and for whom there are no effective treatments.

This is the third time the agency has approved a cancer treatment based on a common biomarker across different types of tumors rather than the location in the body where the tumor originated.

The ability of Rozlytrek to shrink tumors was evaluated in four clinical trials studying 54 adults with NTRK fusion-positive tumors. The proportion of patients with substantial tumor shrinkage (overall response rate) was 57%, with 7.4% of patients having complete disappearance of the tumor. Among the 31 patients with tumor shrinkage, 61% had tumor shrinkage persist for nine months or longer. The most common cancer locations were the lung, salivary gland, breast, thyroid and colon/rectum.

Rozlytrek was granted accelerated approval. This approval commits the sponsor to provide additional data to the FDA. Rozlytrek also received Priority Review, Breakthrough Therapy and Orphan Drug designation. The approval of Rozlytrek was granted to Genentech, Inc.

https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/88121/3/1/?elsca1...

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 2, 2019 02:36PM Lumpie wrote:

Checkpoint Inhibitors in the Neoadjuvant Treatment of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
Interview with Heather Lynn McArthur MD nterview by Farzanna S Haffizulla MD, FACP, FAMWA
Discussion of new approaches to treating triple-Negative Breast Cancer
September 02, 2019
video and transcript - no charge, but sign in may be required.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/84601/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 2, 2019 03:59PM Karenfizedbo15 wrote:

Appreciate the additional info Lumpie, and also Bevgen signposting

Surgery 9/8/2007 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (right): Latissimus dorsi flap Dx 4/2018, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, 1/17 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Sep 3, 2019 04:30PM Lumpie wrote:

New Target for Slowing Breast Cancer's Spread to Brain scientists have identified a protein that plays a role in the metabolic reprogramming of some breast cancer cells, allowing them to survive when they spread to the brain... disabling this protein may represent a novel strategy to prevent and treat breast cancer brain metastases... The spread of breast cancer cells to the brain is correlated with the overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in cancer cells, but the mechanisms driving this correlation were unknown. scientists combed through publicly available genomic databases, discovering that increased levels of the fatty acid-binding protein 7 (FABP7), a lipid-binding protein in the brain, correlated with lower survival and higher incidence of brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Notably, FABP7 is not found in elevated levels in the primary HER2-positive breast tumors, instead only found in tumor cells growing in the brain... In mouse models, the investigators found that disabling FABP7 prevented HER2-positive breast cancer metastasizing into the brain. FABP7 could be used in the future as a biomarker or therapeutic target for breast cancer patients. If high levels of FABP7 were detected in breast cancer patients, it might signal the patient is at risk for cancer spreading to their brain, and targeting or disabling FABP7 could be a promising strategy to prevent or treat breast cancer brain metastasis.

https://news.feinberg.northwestern.edu/2019/08/new-target-for-slowing-breast-cancers-spread-to-brain/

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41388-019-0893-4#Abs1

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41388-019-0893-4

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 3, 2019 04:40PM Lumpie wrote:

Total Chemo Dose Still Matters in Breast Cancer Worse survival with cumulative dose <85% of planned

August 20, 2019

  • Failure to achieve a threshold cumulative dose of adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer correlated with worse survival, particularly when dose reductions occurred early in treatment, a retrospective review of 1,300 patients showed.Patients who received less than 85% of the planned total cumulative dose (TCD) had significantly worse 5-year disease-free survival (DFS, P=0.025) and overall survival (OS, P<0.001), as compared with patients who received 85% or more of the planned TCD. "What surprised us the most was how dramatically early reductions in chemotherapy affect survival compared to later modifications," ... "This became even more apparent when patients were further separated based on chemotherapy dose cutoffs. Often the first cycle of chemotherapy can be difficult for patients, and oncologists must convey the need for maintaining initial dose intensity, while using other medications to control side effects and manage comorbidities."
  • https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/chemotherapy/81721
  • Primary Source Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Source Reference: Veitch Z, et al "Impact of cumulative chemotherapy dose on survival with adjuvant FEC-D chemotherapy for breast cancer" J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019; 17: 957-971.
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 3, 2019 05:00PM Lumpie wrote:

{I generally refrain from posting alarmist, non-cancer-specific articles, but this is truly distressing, IMO, and not from flaky sources.}

How to Eat Less Plastic Your food and water are contaminated with plastic. Here's why it's in the food system and how it could affect your health.

A recent study indicates that the average person consumes a credit card-sized amount of microplastics — the tiny particles of plastics we ingest by eating, drinking, and breathing — every week. The chemicals found in these plastics are linked to harmful health effects, like various cancers, weakened immune systems, and reproductive problems. Find out 6 ways you can reduce unnecessary exposure to potentially harmful plastics.

https://www.consumerreports.org/food/how-to-eat-less-plastic-microplastics-in-food-water/?EXTKEY=EE984BAAC&utm_source=acxiom&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190903_cromc_engagewkly

https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b01517

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/142/2/e20181410

doi: 10.1542/peds.2018-1410

PubMed 30037972

https://cues.rutgers.edu/2019-microplastics-conference/2019-mpc-dwnld.html

https://wwf.panda.org/wwf_news/press_releases/?348337/Revealed-plastic-ingestion-by-people-could-be-equating-to-a-credit-card-a-week

https://www.consumerreports.org/food-safety/gras-hidden-ingredients-in-your-food/

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 4, 2019 10:52AM - edited Sep 4, 2019 10:53AM by debbew

[Discovery of] A molecule that regulates the development of cancer in a variety of human tumors [including breast]

Sonia Guil, leader of the Regulatory and Chromatin RNA group of Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute, and Lourdes Farré of ProCURE (Idibell) have discovered an intermediate molecule expressed from a region of the non-coding genome that is key to the development and differentiation of cells, and for the expansion of tumor cells...

The non-coding sequence that originates RPSAP52, is just "in front" of HMGA2. It has been discovered that it regulates the chain of events responsible for the increase in the number of tumor cells and the expansion of cancer tissues...

The study was carried out by combining in vitro approaches with in vivo studies on animal models. The tumorigenic role of RPSAP52 in breast and sarcoma tumors has been confirmed, and it can also have predictive value as a biomarker...

"For translational research, the findings are significant because these types of molecules are often present at low levels. Therefore they can be attacked and eradicated more easily than the coding genes," says Guil.

The next steps to move forward in this line of research will focus on generating in vivo tumor models and test small molecules that destroy RPSAP52 to study its effect on tumor growth.

Article: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-09-molecule-cancer-variety-human-tumors.html

Study: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11910-6

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Sep 4, 2019 02:05PM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

Is there a reliable site for finding out about clinical trials as well as alternative treatments. I guess my onciologist should know about clinical trials. I may be facing round 3, and just do not think I can go through traditional treatment. For me it does not seem to work. 2009 lumpectomy, radiation, 2 nodes removed; tamoxifen for 5 years; 2016 bi-lateral, 2 nodes removed, cancer only on left side, I opted for bi-lateral, chemotherapy, started with arimidex and stopped after several months due to SE, several months later started tamoxifen. Now it looks like there might be something in the right axilla. The radiologist I just saw said she went through the notes and had been the one to examine the tissue fomr the bi-lateral, and the R-side was clean at that time. One problem with clinical trials, you do not know if you get the placebo or not.

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Sep 4, 2019 02:26PM Lumpie wrote:

I like this site for breast cancer clinical trials:

https://www.breastcancertrials.org/BCTIncludes/index.html;jsessionid=pjP2onl5ysfRgkgHnVHyE4RT_zExcIq-ukNEgVtC.ip-10-20-10-73

You can also go to

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/home

Unless you are at a major research center or your MO has an interest in research, there is a good chance that s/he will not know about specific trials. MO's usually have a lot to keep up with and keeping tabs on the current recruitment status of hundreds of clinical trials may not be their thing. If you find one that you think may be suitable, you can always contact the trial for more info and/or ask your MO about it.

Please note, for stage IV clinical trials you should NEVER be given a placebo! Depending on the phase of study, you would either definitely be given the trial drug or you may be in a study comparing standard of care (or "physician's choice") to a new therapy. It is not an ethical practice to deprive stage IV patients of treatment.

Here's a link for more clinical trial info:

https://www.mbcalliance.org/mbc-alliance-cted This site provides links to additional good resources on clinical trials.

I don't do that much research on alternative treatments, but if I wanted to investigate, I would start with the web site for the National Associations for Naturopathic Doctors

https://aanmc.org/national-associations/

and look for info for the public on Basyr's site:

https://bastyr.edu/

Also peer reviewed journals and nursing research may provide good information. Good luck!


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 4, 2019 05:34PM - edited Sep 4, 2019 05:34PM by Karenfizedbo15

Just reiterating Lumpie's point on stage IV trial patients.....at no point should a stage IV patient be given a placebo.... if that is even suggested bin the trial.

Surgery 9/8/2007 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (right): Latissimus dorsi flap Dx 4/2018, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, 1/17 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Sep 4, 2019 07:55PM marijen wrote:


Breast cancer: Hormone therapy may only put some cells to 'sleep'

Published Tue 3 Sep 2019
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326226.p...


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Sep 6, 2019 07:55AM Lumpie wrote:

Proton Beam Radiation in Patients With Breast Cancer Requiring Regional Nodal Irradiation
  • The authors of this phase II trial provide the first prospective evaluation of proton beam radiotherapy (RT) in breast cancer, evaluating proton beam RT in 70 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer who required postoperative RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymphatics but were considered suboptimal candidates for conventional RT. This approach was associated with low toxicity and similar rates of disease control compared with historical conventional radiotherapy data.
  • With better awareness of cardiac morbidity in this patient population, confirmation of these findings in a randomized phase III trial (RadCOMP Consortium Trial) will be important.
CONCLUSION: Proton beam RT for breast cancer has low toxicity rates and similar rates of disease control compared with historical data of conventional RT. No early cardiac changes were observed, which paves the way for randomized studies to compare proton beam RT with standard RT.

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/88796/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert

https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.18.02366

DOI: 10.1200/JCO.18.02366 Journal of Clinical Oncology

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 6, 2019 01:01PM debbew wrote:

More targeted, less toxic: The golden future of cancer treatment

Researchers have engineered gold-based molecules that target cancer cells and leave healthy cells unharmed, in a critical step towards precision cancer drugs with fewer toxic side effects. Pre-clinical studies have shown the molecules were up to 24 times more effective at killing cancer cells than the widely used anti-cancer drug cisplatin and were also better at inhibiting tumour growth...

Significantly, the synthetic molecules are built with resistance-fighting features to keep them effective over time, unlike current chemotherapies.

The study by researchers at RMIT University, detailing four new bio-active molecules and their effectiveness against five types of cancer cells [prostate, breast, cervical, melanoma and colon cancer], is published in Chemistry—A European Journal...

In addition, the molecules have strong anti-inflammatory properties, giving them a dual therapeutic effect and potential application in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions like arthritis...

The research team has completed successful in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical studies and is seeking funding to support the next stage of the research—clinical studies and regulatory approval.

Article: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-09-toxic-golden-future-cancer-treatment.html

Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/chem.201903388

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Sep 6, 2019 03:47PM Lumpie wrote:

Opinion: Are 71 NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Too Many?

In an opinion piece in The Scientist, David Rubensen argues that the National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated cancer center program "has evolved into a nationwide branding exercise, mostly signifying grant-writing endurance and adherence to metrics that skew scientific priorities and place centers in organizational straight jackets." He suggests questions that he believes should be addressed about the future of the program.

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/opinion--are-71-nci-designated-cancer-centers-too-many--66370?mc_cid=77cb1f6a4c&mc_eid=12d673e585

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 7, 2019 12:02AM Lumpie wrote:

Durvalumab in Combination With Trastuzumab in HER2‐Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer - no clinical activity
  • This phase Ib trial was designed to evaluate the toxicity and activity of durvalumab in combination with trastuzumab among 14 patients with previously treated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). There was no significant activity observed with this regimen among HER2-positive, PD-L1–negative patients; 29% of patients experienced stable disease at 6 weeks.
  • Durvalumab in combination with trastuzumab demonstrated no clinical activity among patients with heavily pretreated HER2‐positive PD‐L1–negative MBC.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/88184/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
http://theoncologist.alphamedpress.org/content/early/2019/08/16/theoncologist.2019-0321
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2019-0321
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 10, 2019 07:11AM Lumpie wrote:

Metronomic Chemotherapy for Advanced Breast Cancer

Metronomic chemotherapy (mCHT) refers to the minimum biologically effective dose of a chemotherapy agent given as a continuous dosing regimen, with no prolonged drug-free breaks, that leads to antitumor activity. Aim of the present study is to describe the use of mCHT in a retrospective cohort of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients in order to collect data regarding the different types and regimens of drugs employed, their efficacy and safety.

  • This retrospective study is a real-world analysis of metronomic chemotherapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer. The highest overall response rate was observed among patients receiving vinorelbine-based regimens. The median time to treatment failure was 6.28 months. The longest median progression-free survival was observed with vinorelbine-based regimens (9.5 months) and capecitabine as a single agent (10.7 months).
  • The authors provide real-world data to inform the use of metronomic chemotherapy among patients with metastatic breast cancer.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/88868/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
https://www.thebreastonline.com/article/S0960-9776(19)30535-1/pdf
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.breast.2019.07.006
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 10, 2019 07:28AM santabarbarian wrote:

One MO doing this is Dr Keith Block in the Chicago area. He is able to treat people who other MOs think have had too much chemo or are too weak for more, by giving a low dose over 24 hours from a fanny pack. (And other innovative deliveries.) Also the chemo can be pulsed when it is most bioavailable/when the cancer is the most active in the 24 hour circadian clock aka "chronomodulation." I actually found out that Taxotere is most bioactive at 5-6 am and carboplatin at 4 pm. (I emailed a researcher in London to find this out.) So I got my Taxotere at 8 am and my carboplatin at 4 pm. They just taped me off in between.

pCR after neoadjuvant chemo w/ integrative practices Dx 7/13/2018, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- (FISH) Chemotherapy 8/13/2018 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 12/27/2018 Lumpectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 2/11/2019 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
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Sep 10, 2019 07:40AM Lumpie wrote:

santabarbarian: Thanks for sharing your experience. This is an interesting approach and I suspect that it may allow those not otherwise able to tolerate chemo to benefit from this therapy. I have known patients who received low(er?) dose continuous infusion, namely, pregnant women, and have wondered if alternative approaches to the more "usual" infusion schedules had been studied in others.

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Sep 10, 2019 08:43AM JaBoo wrote:

I would like to contribute a bit, my first try here among all these incredibly helpful posts... I hope this may be interesting...

There is a promising agent being tested here in the EU, called MitoTam, which is a mitochondrialy targeted Tamoxifen. It has just entered phase II trials

https://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/79/4_Supplement/P6-18-20

Mentioned in this article: Mitochondrial Flexibility of Breast Cancers: A Growth Advantage and a Therapeutic Opportunity


dx at 38 Dx 5/22/2018, IDC, Left, 2cm, Grade 3, 1/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (FISH) Surgery 6/14/2018 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Surgery 6/19/2018 Lumpectomy: Left Chemotherapy 7/15/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Hormonal Therapy 7/16/2018 Zoladex (goserelin) Targeted Therapy 9/12/2018 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Hormonal Therapy 1/10/2019 Aromasin (exemestane) Surgery 1/20/2019 Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Hormonal Therapy 6/26/2019 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Sep 10, 2019 04:03PM - edited Sep 10, 2019 04:04PM by marijen

Study confirms low fat diets benefit women's health

Published Mon 9 Sep 2019

By Ana Sandoiu

Fact checked by Gianna D'Emilio

New research spanning over almost 2 decades finds that a low fat diet benefits women's health.

A low fat diet that includes lots of fruits and vegetables benefits women's health in the long run, according to new research.

Older studies in rats and mice have found that rodents on a high fat diet develop more tumors than those on a low fat diet.

Some of these studies referred to colorectal cancer in particular, while othersshowed that high fat diets boosted tumor growth in mouse models of breast cancer.

More recently, studies in humans have suggested that following a low fat dietary plan could improve the health and lifespan of women who have received a diagnosis of breast cancer.

Read more athttps://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326286.p...


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