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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 20, 2017 11:31PM - edited Nov 20, 2017 11:35PM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 11, 2019 07:03AM debbew wrote:

USFDA designates Indian invention a 'breakthrough device' for cancer

The Centre for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) of the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has designated Cytotron—a device invented in India by a Bengaluru scientist—as a "Breakthrough Device" in the treatment of liver, pancreas and breast cancers...

Cytotron uses Fast Radio Bursts (FRB)—a high energy and powerful short radio bursts—in which both electric and magnetic components of the electromagnetic signals are "circularly" polarized...

FRBs can be used to communicate with the cellular command and control, to up or down regulate a specific protein or gene. In cancer cells, Cytotron does two things:First, it alters the protein pathways of a pro-apoptosis protein called p53 via p21 inducing programmed cell death in the cancer cells, and secondly, exposure to Cytotron stops metastasis by inhibiting the Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition cells, responsible for spread of cancer[.]

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/usfda-designates-indian-invention-a-breakthrough-device-for-cancer/articleshow/72007186.cms

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Nov 11, 2019 10:34AM LilyCh wrote:

"Scientists have created a new cowpox-style virus in a bid to cure cancer.

The treatment, called CF33, can kill every type of cancer in a petrie dish and has shrunk tumours in mice, The Daily Telegraph reported.

US cancer expert Professor Yuman Fong is engineering the treatment, which is being developed by Australia biotech company Imugene.

They are hoping the treatment will be tested on breast cancer patients, among other cancer sufferers, next year."

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/techandscience/breakthrough-as-scientists-create-a-new-cowpox-style-virus-that-can-kill-every-type-of-cancer/ar-BBWwhcp

Dx 6/5/2018, IDC, Right, 2cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 7/11/2018 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 7/11/2018 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 7/11/2018 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 11/20/2018 Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy 1/13/2019 Whole-breast: Breast Hormonal Therapy 3/11/2019 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Nov 11, 2019 09:46PM Lumpie wrote:

Common early sign of cardiovascular disease also may indicate cancer risk, study finds

A Mayo Clinic-led study involving 488 cardiac patients whose cases were followed for up to 12 years finds that microvascular endothelial dysfunction, a common early sign of cardiovascular disease, is associated with a greater than twofold risk of cancer.

https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/common-early-sign-of-cardiovascular-disease-also-may-indicate-cancer-risk-study-finds/

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2047487319884246

https://doi.org/10.1177/2047487319884246

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 12, 2019 06:31AM debbew wrote:

'Smart needle' could speed up cancer detection 'with a less intrusive process'

Cancer detection could become much quicker and easier in the future after scientists developed a new "smart needle" that uses a mini laser to identify diseased tissue within seconds.

Researchers have demonstrated the technique works in the lab and have just begun a major three-year clinical trial to test it in living people.

They have focused on lymphoma so far but are hopeful the technique could also be used to diagnose other forms of the disease, such as breast and prostate cancer, further down the line.

https://inews.co.uk/news/science/smart-needle-cancer-detection-breast-cancer-prostate-cancer-process-explained-921561


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Nov 12, 2019 06:52AM debbew wrote:

NIH RO1 grant to help improve ultrasound tomography for breast cancer detection

"The current methods of mammography or tomosynthesis are based on X-rays," Anastasio noted. "Some small early stage cancers especially in younger women are difficult to detect in such images so the industry understands the need for improvement. We're investigating this new technology that can be useful for breast cancer imaging that is based on the use of ultrasound instead of X-rays. Not only is it safer because it doesn't involve ionizing radiation, it is more sensitive to certain tissue properties that will make it easier to detect subtle breast cancers..."

"We quickly realized that through the use of advanced image reconstruction principles and high-performance computing, we can actually do a better job of modeling the physics and reconstruct images of much better quality," Anastasio explained. "They almost look like MRI images in terms of resolution."

Both Duric and Anastasio chose to focus this technique on breast cancer detection, partly because it is a disease the affects a vast number of women, but also because it is a part of the body where ultrasound tomography will work relatively well.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-11/uoic-nrg111119.php

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Nov 12, 2019 02:00PM Lumpie wrote:

Axillary Evaluation Is Not Warranted in Patients Preoperatively Diagnosed With DCIS Core Needle Biopsy
  • The authors of this retrospective study of 604 women with a preoperative diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by core needle biopsy looked for predictors of upstaging and axillary lymph node metastasis. Upstaging to DCIS with microinvasion (20%) and invasive breast cancer (32%) was common, but positive axillary lymph nodes (7%) were not. Factors predicting upstaging on multivariate analysis included tumor size >2 cm on ultrasound and ER+/HER2+ status. Factors predictive of axillary lymph node metastasis included tumor size on pathology and number of lesions.
  • The authors concluded that the finding of a low rate of axillary metastasis, even in the setting of a 52% upstaging rate in this study, supports the omission of axillary evaluation in low-risk patients.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/91853/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cam4.2623
https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.2623
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 12, 2019 06:16PM debbew wrote:

HOUSEHOLD CHEMICALS COULD BE LINKED TO AGGRESSIVE FORM OF BREAST CANCER, SCIENTISTS BELIEVE

The team found many of the nuclear receptors behaved differently in the [triple negative] breast cancer samples. Using a computer model, they identified certain household detergents, antiseptics, industrial pollutants and prescribed medications which might to activate nuclear receptors, or change how they are expressed.

Study co-author Laura Matthews, a breast cancer and nuclear receptor expert at the University of Leeds, said in a statement: "We are now investigating how the environmental chemicals change the behavior of normal breast cells so we can understand how they might drive cancer development.

"We are also testing whether using drug combinations that target multiple NRs [nuclear receptors] at the same time might prevent or be an effective treatment for TNBC. Our goal is to reduce the number of people that develop breast cancer, and guide new therapies, so that more people can live beyond breast cancer," she said...

Justin Stebbing, professor of Cancer Medicine and Medical Oncology at Imperial College London... commented in a statement: "...This study opens up new avenues for research. However, for now there is no link between household antiseptics or chemicals to breast cancer."

https://www.newsweek.com/household-chemicals-could-linked-aggressive-form-breast-cancer-scientists-believe-1471120

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Nov 13, 2019 10:15AM 2019whatayear wrote:

No info in the article re. what chemicals exactly. --Rude! Well always good to use vinegar for cleaning! Cheap and pretty effective. Seems like if that is the case-- household detergents- chemicals that they would see a higher incidence of BC in people who clean for a living.

I found myself reading others signatures & comparing my dx to others. I decided to delete my info off my sig, b/c I felt like I was viewing people as their dx vrs. as individuals BRCA-2-BMX 6/25 -chemo 7/24 AC/T
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Nov 13, 2019 12:18PM - edited Nov 13, 2019 12:18PM by debbew

^^^I agree 2019whatayear; the study was just a computer model so it wasn't tied into epidemiological data, but they could have been more helpful on the details.

___________________________________________________________

Cardiac resynchronization therapy benefits cancer survivors with heart failure

A pacemaker-like device restored heart function in a group of cancer survivors -- mostly women with breast cancer -- who had suffered from heart failure as a result of chemotherapy treatment, a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reports...

Known as the MADIT-CHIC study, it was the first of its kind to assess whether cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) could improve heart function in patients with congestive heart failure and cardiomyopathy, an enlargement of the heart due to chemotherapy side effects.

After six months with the implanted CRT devices, the 30 patients who received cardiac resynchronization therapy experienced significant improvement. The study, which took place between 2014 and 2018, was designed to address a problem that impacts more than half of people who receive anthracycline-based chemotherapies to treat cancer.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-11/uorm-crt111219.php

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Nov 14, 2019 06:45PM debbew wrote:

Researchers Halt Spread of Breast Cancer by Blocking Metastasis-Promoting Enzyme

In a breakthrough with important implications for the future of immunotherapy for breast cancer, UC San Francisco scientists have found that blocking the activity of a single enzyme can prevent a common type [luminol B] of breast cancer from spreading to distant organs.

The new study, published Nov. 14 in the journal Life Science Alliance, shows that these metastases can be stopped before they are able to lay the foundations for tumor growth. By administering an antibody that specifically targets and disrupts MMP9 activity, the scientists were able to prevent cancer from colonizing the lungs of mice. But interestingly, interfering with MMP9 had no effect on the primary tumor, which suggests that the enzyme's primary role in this scenario is helping existing malignancies metastasize and colonize other organs rather than promoting the growth of established primary tumors...

The researchers also discovered that interfering with MMP9 activity helped recruit and activate cancer-fighting immune cells to metastatic sites, a result with important implications for treating certain types of metastatic breast cancer with immunotherapy...

"These findings come at an exciting time in cancer immunology, with antibodies targeting MMP9 being actively explored for clinical use within the biotech industry," Plaks said. "There's been great interest in trying to use immunotherapy to treat metastatic breast cancers of the luminal B type, but so far, success has been limited. Our work indicates that a combination approach of immunotherapy with antibodies targeting MMP9 activity might actually succeed."


https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2019/11/415941/researchers-halt-spread-breast-cancer-blocking-metastasis-promoting-enzyme


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Nov 14, 2019 07:09PM - edited Nov 14, 2019 07:10PM by Frisky

now all we have to do is stay alive for the next ten/fifteen years...

“Things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many; the intelligence of a few perceives what has been carefully hidden.” Phaedrus Dx 3/9/2015, ILC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 3/15/2015 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy 3/10/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy 3/10/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Surgery 4/5/2017 Radiation Therapy 4/10/2017 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 1/5/2018 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Targeted Therapy 2/10/2018 Afinitor (everolimus) Chemotherapy 6/2/2018 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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Nov 14, 2019 10:50PM thisiknow wrote:

Profound. Medicating

Age 72 @dx - Oncotype 4 Dx 8/2019, DCIS/IDC, Both breasts, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Radiation Therapy 10/27/2019 Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Left, Right; Lymph node removal: Sentinel
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Nov 15, 2019 09:30AM debbew wrote:

Mechanism of a breast cancer drug points to a possible new therapy

Despite trastuzumab being a game-changing treatment for HER2-positive breast cancers over the past two decades, its success has come with key gaps in the understanding of how, exactly, it works...

Hartman and colleagues confirmed in mouse experiments and human cell lines that trastuzumab triggers a process called antibody-dependent phagocytosis, which is a way that specific immune cells engulf and eat particles, specifically tumor cells coated with the HER2 antibody.

They also found that by adding another antibody to remove a roadblock in this cell death process, they could strongly improve the drug's anti-tumor ability. The finding was notable because this roadblock for cell death is driven by the CD47 gene, which is highly expressed in HER2-positive breast cancer patients who have worse outcomes.

"Our finding suggests that blocking this CD47 axis could lead to an effective therapeutic strategy in patients," Hartman said.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-11-mechanism-breast-cancer-drug-therapy.html

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Nov 15, 2019 11:09AM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

Environmental toxins. Reading "Anti Cancer Living " Cohen and Jeffries. In their chapter on "The Environment and Quest for Health" and "Appendix C, Environmental Toxin Hit List", the list is extensive and includes far more than just pesticides/herbicides. The book has an extensive bibliography. I used to read labels for added sugar, artificial ingredients. I need to become much more informed. Need to watch the soaps/shampoos, and other cleaners, toothpaste, Not ready to throw out all the yogurt containers I use for left overs and invest in glass containers.


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Nov 16, 2019 03:31PM Lumpie wrote:

Best, Worst, and Typical Cancer Survival: New Estimates Tool

"How much time have I got, Doc?" That's a question never far from the mind of most metastatic breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, accurate estimates are elusive. A new approach mitigates the difficulty of that tough task by offering not one but three estimates.

Belinda Kiely, MD, ...proposed offering patients best, worst, and typical scenarios derived from clinical trial data. Her system is not formalized as an online tool but is a simple math exercise.

...physicians who give advanced breast cancer patients one estimate, such as 12 months, are wrong 70% to 80% of the time.

Kiely's method involves using multiples based in part on overall survival curves from clinical trials...doctors estimate the expected survival time for a patient, **divide it by four to get the worst-case scenario, and then multiply by three to get the best-case scenario. The typical scenario is between a half and two times the doctors' estimated survival.**

...providing three scenarios helps patients prepare for the possible worst case and, at the same time, hope for the possible best case....subtype, extent of disease, comorbidities, and other factors determine outcomes. By using multiples derived from studies that closely reflect a given patient's situation, oncologists can offer a more nuanced assessment.

"Research shows that patients who discuss these issues with their doctor have better quality of life, are less likely to undergo aggressive end-of-life resuscitation, and are less likely to die in the hospital. But at the moment, we also know that many patients are not having these conversations."

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/921425?src=wnl_edit_tpal&uac=210289DR&impID=2169570&faf=1#vp_1


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 16, 2019 04:05PM BevJen wrote:

For anyone who is interested in finding out about clinical trials in immunotherapy, go to the Cancer Research Institute -- website is https://www.cancerresearch.org

I went to one of their patient summits today up at Johns Hopkins, and it was a fabulous program. Lots of opportunities for information sharing, both with patients and practitioners. Very worthwhile program (they already have 2 set up for 2020 -- see their website).

Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap
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Nov 16, 2019 07:22PM mysticalcity wrote:

https://www.breastcancertrials.org/bct_nation/browse_trials.seam

is another great site to review a variety of breast cancer trials.

Dx 3/22/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 6/1/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole) Surgery 6/26/2019 Cryotherapy: Left Radiation Therapy
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Nov 19, 2019 10:40AM Lumpie wrote:

Could value-based care help cure diagnostic errors?

Dr. David Newman-Toker told the Diagnostic Error in Medicine conference that fee-for-service payments are "toxic to diagnosis" and eliminating them would significantly reduce errors. Dr. Mark McClellan said alternative payment models are an important step toward more rapid progress in reducing diagnostic errors, while Dr. Michelle Schreiber talked about quality measures based on diagnosis and said she would like to see quality and safety measures given more attention.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/publichealthpolicy/publichealth/83303

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 19, 2019 11:48AM Lumpie wrote:

Breast Cancer Screening Policies Questioned Again Current guidelines may miss early detection in women with family history

Researchers conducting a large national registry study recommended changes to current breast cancer screening guidelines that would make family history a more important consideration in setting ages to begin regular mammography.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/br...

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 20, 2019 04:22PM marijen wrote:

Pivotal Data in HER2+ Breast Cancer Transform Paradigm

Erika P. Hamilton, MD, discusses several studies in the HER2-positive breast cancer space and sequencing challenges that have emerged.

Research Efforts in HER2+ Breast Cancer Focused on Optimizing Novel Agents

Gregory Vidal, MD, PhD, highights ways in which available and investigational agents are being evaluated across HER2-positive breast cancer settings.

Adjuvant T-DM1 Approaches EU Approval for HER2+ Early Breast Cancer

Will the phase III KATHERINE data lead to a European approval in the adjuvant setting?

Exciting Advances Continue in HER2+ Breast Cancer and Other Subtypes

Kurt W. Tauer, MD, FACP, discusses encouraging updates across the spectrum of breast cancer subtypes.

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Nov 20, 2019 06:12PM mysticalcity wrote:

Arthritis drugs could prevent fatal spread of breast cancer

Research teams from the University of Manchester and the University of Sheffield discovered that a protein released by bone marrow, called interleukin 1-beta encouraged breast cancer cells to form secondary tumours once they reach the bone.

Tests found that this molecule can be blocked by the drug anakinra, already used to treat arthritis.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/11/20/arthritis-drugs-could-prevent-fatal-spread-breast-cancer/?fbclid=IwAR0J09mY4Rj3aYek88XJTCaTz1HqAbIpUfLRWTTSk87y3o4cnbDBZ1S8sdk

Dx 3/22/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 6/1/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole) Surgery 6/26/2019 Cryotherapy: Left Radiation Therapy
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Nov 22, 2019 03:55PM Lumpie wrote:

Study finds breast cancer recurrence score has different implications for men

A new study by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) researchers published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, indicates that a lower threshold is needed for male patients to predict mortality using the genetic assay, Oncotype DX, a commercial diagnostic test.

http://news.vumc.org/2019/11/20/study-finds-breast-cancer-recurrence-score-has-different-implications-for-men/

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 22, 2019 04:04PM Lumpie wrote:

Study Suggests Viable Alternative to Mastectomy After In-Breast Recurrence Mastectomy rates low, good cancer control in selected patients

A second lumpectomy followed by partial breast re-irradiation (PBrI) was an effective alternative to mastectomy in women who had in-breast cancer recurrence after initial treatment with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast irradiation (WBI), a single-center, phase II study found.

Continued follow-up of patients enrolled in the NRG/RTOG 1014 trial demonstrated that a second breast-conservation approach using lumpectomy and partial breast re-irradiation for management of in-breast recurrence was associated with continued high breast preservation (5-year freedom from mastectomy rate of 90%), with good cancer control and low risk of toxic effects," the researchers wrote in JAMA Oncology.

They noted that approximately 10% of 10 women treated with lumpectomy and irradiation will have a recurrence of breast cancer in the ipsilateral breast -- i.e., in-breast recurrence -- which historically, has always been managed with mastectomy.

They cautioned, however, that this approach is not recommended for all patients with an in-breast recurrence after their first lumpectomy but rather only for women with small, recurrent disease amenable to a second lumpectomy and who are motivated to avoid a mastectomy.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/breastcancer/83495?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2019-11-22&eun=g1278169d0r&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Headlines%20Top%20Cat%20HeC%20%202019-11-22&utm_term=NL_Daily_DHE_dual-gmail-definition

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaoncology/article-abstract/2755430

doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.4320

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 24, 2019 11:55AM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

mysticalcity - thank you for the post to clinical trials. BC for the third time!!! When I contacted one research facility, they said they had no trials, did not know of any for my situatain, and would be prescribing the same treatment as my DR. They sounded bored with my history and treatment of BC. This site will help me do a little of my own "research" and maybe ask questions that I had not thought about.

2009 ER+ left breast. 52 yrs. Lumpectomy, Sentinel node removal, negative. Radiation 6 weeks, tamoxifen 5 years. Dense lumpy left breast, normal right. Acupuncture offered at facility as part of integrative medicine. It really helped with anxiety/stress during radiation treatment.

2016 ER+ left breast. Probably a new cancer, but unknown. 4 rounds TC Aug-Oct 2016, Bi-lateral (my choice) Nov 2016, no reconstruction. 2 sentinel nodes remove, negative. Cold Capping using Chemo Cold Caps (DIGNICAP not available). Anastrozole 1 mg starting May 2017. Joint issues noticed immediately. Stopped Anastrozole after 3-4 months due to joint stiffness in. After several months of no AIs, fingers were feeling better. Started tamoxifen March 2018

7/19/2019 - swelling in R-arm, opposite side from where lymph nodes removed. Noticed 6/18/2019. Could have been swelling earlier but wearing long sleeves. Trip to urgent care. They did ultrasound, concerned that there might be a clot, there was not. Started seeing lymphatic therapist 7/2/2019.

8/2019 CT, Breast/chest , neck/thyroid ultra sound

9/2019 DR ordered biopsy, said it could be lymphoma, cancer, benign lymphatic. Biopsy R-axilla. Cancer. Genetic test showed no known markers (20+ looked for)

9/29/2019 PET scan, no indication of spread. Arimidex and Ibrance prescribed to shrink tumor prior to surgery.

10/2019 – Stopped Tamoxifen. Started Arimidex and Ibrance. Brand name Arimidex so far does not seem to have the SEs that generics did, but stiff/trigger finger on left middle finger returned.


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Nov 25, 2019 01:37AM Kanga_Roo wrote:

Amazing new technology for detecting cancer using a drop of blood!

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20191125/p2g/00m/0bu/030000c



Dx 1/24/2018, IDC, Left, 5cm, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 2/11/2018 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy 2/15/2018 Kisqali
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Nov 25, 2019 08:42AM Lumpie wrote:

T-DM1 Efficacy in Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Progressing After a Taxane Plus Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab
  • This observational study was designed to evaluate the outcomes of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer treated with T-DM1 after prior exposure to trastuzumab/ pertuzumab/ taxane. The median overall survival (OS) was not reached, with a 1-year OS rate of 82%. The objective response rate was 27%, with 40% of patients achieving durable disease control.
  • T-DM1 appears to have meaningful activity among patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer previously treated with pertuzumab plus trastuzumab and a taxane.

Commentary by Lillie D Shockney RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG

These results are refreshing and hopeful for clinicians and their patients. T-DM1 is familiar to those who specialize in breast cancer, but it may not be to general medical oncologists. This could serve as a reminder to patients to obtain a second opinion from a large teaching hospital or comprehensive cancer center where specialization in breast cancer exists. Patients need access to the right treatment, and their treatment team needs to be totally knowledgeable and offer the right drug therapies that can provide optimal clinical outcomes.

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/92586/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert

https://www.clinical-breast-cancer.com/article/S1526-8209(19)30671-8/pdf

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clbc.2019.09.001
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 25, 2019 08:45AM Lumpie wrote:

Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy for Bone Only Oligometastatic Breast Cancer
  • This prospective trial was designed to evaluate the use of single-fraction stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for 15 patients with bone-only oligometastatic breast cancer. The 2-year local progression-free survival rate was 100%; the 2-year distant progression–free survival rate was 67%.
  • SABR appears to be feasible and effective in this population. Randomized trials are warranted to compare outcomes with SABR and the current standard of care.
Commentary by Lillie D Shockney RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG

SABR is a new treatment option for patients that has not been usually utilized before. It may require a second opinion, and application of this treatment may need to be done elsewhere, particularly if the patient lives in a rural area and/or receives care from a general medical oncologist without knowledge or readily available access to this type of treatment. Accuracy of staging work-up needs to be factored in here, too, to confirm the patient has bone-only disease.

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/92587/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert

https://www.thebreastonline.com/article/S0960-9776(19)30590-9/fulltext

DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.breast.2019.10.016

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/13/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 25, 2019 10:33PM marijen wrote:

Lumpie, please translate!

search Article

Diet-related metabolomic signature of long-term breast cancer risk using penalized regression: an exploratory study in the SU.VI.MAX cohort

Lucie Lécuyer, Céline Dalle, Sophie Lefevre-Arbogast, Pierre Micheau, Bernard Lyan, Adrien Rossary, Aicha Demidem, Mélanie Petera, Marie Lagree, Delphine Centeno, Pilar Galan, Serge Hercberg, Cécilia Samieri, Nada Assi, Pietro Ferrari, Vivian Viallon, Mélanie Deschasaux, Valentin Partula, Bernard Srour, Paule Latino-Martel, Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Nathalie Druesne-Pecollo, Marie-Paule Vasson, Stéphanie Durand, Estelle Pujos-Guillot, Claudine Manach and Mathilde Touvier

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DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0900

Abstract

Background:Diet has been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer. Highlighting predictive diet-related biomarkers would be of great public health relevance to identify at-risk subjects. The aim of this exploratory study was to select diet-related metabolites discriminating women at higher risk of breast cancer using untargeted metabolomics. Methods:Baseline plasma samples of 200 incident breast cancer cases and matched controls, from a nested case-control study within the SU.VI.MAX cohort, were analysed by untargeted LC-MS. Diet-related metabolites were identified by partial correlation with dietary exposures, and best predictors of breast cancer risk were then selected by Elastic Net penalized regression. The selection stability was assessed using bootstrap resampling. Results:595 ions were selected as candidate diet-related metabolites. 14 of them were selected by Elastic Net regression as breast cancer risk discriminant ions. A lower level of piperine (a compound from pepper) and higher levels of AcetylTributylCitrate (an alternative plasticizer to phthalates), pregnene-triol sulfate (a steroid sulfate) and 2-amino-4-cyano butanoic acid (a metabolite linked to microbiota metabolism) were observed in plasma from women who subsequently developed breast cancer. This metabolomic signature was related to several dietary exposures such as a "Western" dietary pattern and higher alcohol and coffee intakes. Conclusions:Our study suggested a diet-related plasma metabolic signature involving exogenous, steroid metabolites and microbiota-related compounds associated with long-term breast cancer risk that should be confirmed in large-scale independent studies. Impact:These results could help to identify healthy women at higher risk of breast cancer and improve the understanding of nutrition and health relationship.

  • Received July 29, 2019.
  • Revision received October 3, 2019.
  • Accepted November 18, 2019.
  • Copyright ©2019, American Association for Cancer Research.
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Nov 26, 2019 09:57AM santabarbarian wrote:

"Eating a Western diet and consuming alcohol/coffee in high amounts produces a pattern of metabolic effects that also correlate with higher risk of BC. These metabolic effects can be measured by a blood test, and may predict risk of BC before it develops."

pCR after neoadjuvant chemo w/ integrative practices Dx 7/13/2018, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- (FISH) Chemotherapy 8/12/2018 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 12/27/2018 Lumpectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 2/11/2019 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
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Nov 27, 2019 08:00PM 2019whatayear wrote:

ugh I don't like the vague *high amounts* on that. will look forward to more studies.

I found myself reading others signatures & comparing my dx to others. I decided to delete my info off my sig, b/c I felt like I was viewing people as their dx vrs. as individuals BRCA-2-BMX 6/25 -chemo 7/24 AC/T

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