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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 21, 2017 12:31AM - edited Nov 21, 2017 12:35AM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Jan 4, 2020 03:37PM Shelligirl wrote:

Lumpie, thanks for posting this. Noticed that you are a double negative too. Hopefully, identifying these subgroups and outcomes will be included in future treatment studies.

Dx 6/18/2019, IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (FISH)
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Jan 6, 2020 06:30PM MountainMia wrote:

A dear family friend works for an organization that has created a running database of PubMed publications. If you look at the home page for PubMed, it says "PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites." That's a lot of links, and they don't database it to make it easier to search.

The database my friend is working on is called meta.org. Here is a page on how it works. You can create customized searches and get notifications of new research posted. You will need to create an account, but it is FREE and always will be.

My first search term (and you can create multiples) is for triple negative breast cancer. Here is part of the page of searches, so you can see what it looks like.

I have just opened my account this week, so I am barely figuring out how to deal with it. Those of you who are even more research oriented than I might have a good time with this.


The rain comes and the rain goes, but the mountain remains. I am the mountain.
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Jan 6, 2020 06:54PM debbew wrote:

Coolio, thanks, MM!

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Jan 7, 2020 07:08AM debbew wrote:

Newly discovered behavior of known chemical compound might lead to breast cancer drugs that keep [ER+] tumors from coming back

...Tamoxifen, and drugs like it, block the ER-alpha receptor, while fulvestrant and similar drugs induce the cell to degrade it. By blocking or degrading the ER-alpha receptor, these anti-hormonal drugs greatly reduce the signal for the cancer cell to grow and reproduce. But, as Prossnitz and his team have previously shown, they also activate GPER, and GPER signals the cell to keep growing and reproducing.

Most breast cancer cells follow the ER-alpha signal and die on schedule when ER-alpha is blocked or degraded. But a very small number of breast cancer cells may follow the GPER signal and survive. And those cells can grow into aggressive tumors that no longer respond to anti-hormonal drugs.

Prossnitz and his team discovered a compound some years ago called AB-1 that binds to ER-alpha but does not activate GPER, thereby avoiding the undesirable side effect of current anti-hormonal drugs. In their Cell Chemical Biology paper, they report their studies that describe AB-1's unique binding and activity behavior.

https://www.newswise.com//articles/discovery-could-lead-to-new-breast-cancer-drugs

paper: https://www.cell.com/cell-chemical-biology/fulltext/S2451-9456(19)30354-X?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS245194561930354X%3Fshowall%3Dtrue

DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2019.10.009

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Jan 7, 2020 08:07PM debbew wrote:

Genetic study provides most comprehensive map of risk to date of breast cancer risk

A major international study of the genetics of breast cancer has identified more than 350 DNA 'errors' that increase an individual's risk of developing the disease. The scientists involved say these errors may influence as many as 190 genes...

In this new study, researchers from hundreds of institutions worldwide collaborated to compare the DNA of 110,000 breast cancer patients against that of some 90,000 healthy controls. By looking in much closer detail than was previously possibly, they identified 352 risk variants. It is not yet clear exactly how many genes these target, but the researchers have identified 191 genes with reasonable confidence; less than one in five of these had been previously recognised.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200107122305.htm

DOI: 10.1038/s41588-019-0537-1

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Jan 7, 2020 08:11PM debbew wrote:

New Compounds Block Master Regulator of Cancer Growth, Metastasis

Scientists have developed new drug compounds that thwart the pro-cancer activity of FOXM1, a transcription factor that regulates the activity of dozens of genes. The new compounds suppress tumor growth in human cells and in mouse models of several types of human breast cancer...

"FOXM1 is a key factor that makes breast cancer and many other cancers more aggressive and more difficult to treat," Benita Katzenellenbogen said. "Because it is a master regulator of cancer growth and metastasis, there has been great interest in developing compounds that would be effective in blocking it."

The research is promising, but preliminary, the scientists said. Full development of new anti-cancer drug agents can take more than a decade from this stage of discovery.

https://scitechdaily.com/new-compounds-kill-breast-cancer-cells-and-block-tumor-growth/

DOI: 10.1038/s41523-019-0141-7

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Jan 8, 2020 10:54AM BevJen wrote:

For those who are HER2+ -- this just appeared in the National Cancer Institute newsletter about two new treatments

https://www.cancer.gov/news-events/cancer-currents...


Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap
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Jan 9, 2020 11:48AM Hopeful82014 wrote:

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/94747/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert

Re: Clinical and pathological factors influencing risk of late distant recurrence in ER+ ILC


Dx IDC
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Jan 9, 2020 12:25PM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

Murfy - thank you for the lymphedema post. I will ask the DR. Right now my DR is very hopeful that the Ibrance will knock out the tumor in the axilla causing it, and that no more treatment will be needed. It is on the contraleteral side where lymphnodes removed. Have you heard anything about the success rate of surgery for lymphedema? DR, a surgeon, and lymphatic therapist not confident in surgery approach, not available in my state.

2009 - Left. Lumpectomy, 2 nodes checked, radiation, tamoxifen 5 years

2016 Left, again. Chemo, bi-lateral (my choice), AI initially, switched to tamoxifen (SEs)

2019 - Sweeling in right arm. Scans and biopsy revealed cancer in R- A axilla. Now on Ibrance.

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Jan 11, 2020 12:27PM debbew wrote:

Molecule 'selectively killed [triple negative] cancer cells,'

[A] small molecule discovered in animals on the seabed off the coast of Bjørnøya in 2011 [is being investigated for its effects on caner].

The molecule is part of a so-called hydroid – a collection of single cells joined together in a plant-like form and stuck on the seabed. Tests of its impact on multiple cell lines revealed many that were unaffected, but breast cancer cells showed the greatest impact.

The largest impact was the samples against a special type of breast cancer cells including triple-negative breast cancer...

"If it can be developed into a medicine, it will be a completely new treatment alternative for a group of cancer patients who now have limited treatment options," [Kine Østnes Hansen, an associate researcher at UiT Norway's Arctic University] said.

Article: http://icepeople.net/2020/01/11/svalbard-scientists-discover-breast-cancer-cure-molecule-selectively-killed-cancer-cells-but-as-of-now-working-hard-to-see-if-it-is-possible-to-make-medicine/

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Jan 11, 2020 09:57PM marijen wrote:

Flu vaccines may shrink tumors and boost cancer treatment

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/327452.php

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Jan 12, 2020 06:49PM Karenfizedbo15 wrote:

nice one Marijen

Surgery 9/8/2007 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (right): Latissimus dorsi flap Dx 4/2018, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, 1/17 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jan 13, 2020 05:23PM BevJen wrote:

Wow! TNBC patients -- take a look at this!

https://www.cancernetwork.com/breast-cancer/cytody...


Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap
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Jan 13, 2020 05:46PM marijen wrote:

That is pretty amazing Bev/Jen. It's good for 10 autoimmune diseases and fatty liver. I wonder what the autoimmune diseases are as a lot of us have them.


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Jan 13, 2020 06:03PM santabarbarian wrote:

Wow! Thanks for posting!

pCR after neoadjuvant chemo w/ integrative practices Dx 7/13/2018, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- (FISH) Chemotherapy 8/13/2018 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 12/27/2018 Lumpectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 2/11/2019 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
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Jan 13, 2020 06:08PM BevJen wrote:

Marijen,

I also wonder if this would be applicable to non-TNBC cancer at some point, since it sure sounds like some kind of wonder drug.

Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap
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Jan 13, 2020 07:32PM Karenfizedbo15 wrote:

another nice one BevJen!


Surgery 9/8/2007 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (right): Latissimus dorsi flap Dx 4/2018, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, 1/17 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jan 14, 2020 02:13AM BSandra wrote:

Thanks BevJen, I think Leronlimab is also for other types, as CCR5 expression could be observed in many different cancers....

Feb 2019: local recurrence in left breast, IBC. May 2018-Feb 2019: NED. Additional strategies: Omega3:Omega6, Cp lowering, CBD/CBDA, DC/CIK since June 2018 Dx 8/4/2017, IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, Grade 2, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 8/27/2017 Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 3/12/2019 Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 7/22/2019 Mastectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 9/9/2019 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Jan 15, 2020 02:11AM marijen wrote:

How proton radiotherapy can kill cancer in milliseconds

New research in mice shows "for the first time" that scientists can use protons to administer radiation therapy in a matter of milliseconds, killing cancer cells while protecting healthy tissue.


https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/327476.p...


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Jan 15, 2020 11:47AM Lumpie wrote:

New Cardiac Abnormalities Following Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Trastuzumab
  • "This retrospective study was designed to evaluate imaging abnormalities following modern radiation therapy and trastuzumab for breast cancer. Left-sided radiation was associated with an increase in new cardiac abnormalities. The incidence of new abnormalities correlated with radiation dose exposure." – Neil Majithia, MD
  • New cardiac abnormalities appear to be relatively common among patients with breast cancer treated with trastuzumab plus radiation. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the long-term clinical significance of these abnormalities seen on imaging.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/94771/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
https://www.clinical-breast-cancer.com/article/S1526-8209(19)30765-7/pdf
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clbc.2019.12.006




"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Jan 15, 2020 11:51AM Lumpie wrote:

Molecular Imaging to Identify Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Benefit From Endocrine Treatment Combined With Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibition
  • This study was designed to evaluate the predictive benefit of positron-emission tomography with estrogen-tagged labeling (FES-PET) for 27 patients with ER+ breast cancer treated with letrozole and palbociclib. The median time to progression was 73 weeks in those with 100% FES-positive disease versus 27 weeks in heterogenous FES-positive disease and 15 weeks in those without FES positivity.
  • FES-PET may identify patients with ER+ breast cancer who will benefit from the addition of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor to letrozole.
Commentary by Lillie D Shockney RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG

It is wonderful to see that FES-PET may provide a means of helping to determine which patients with hormone receptor–positive metastatic disease may benefit most from endocrine treatment combined with a CDK-inhibiting drug. The authors discuss the difficulties in obtaining biopsies from metastatic lesions, which can be correct in some cases. A bigger issue, however, is that, in many cases, no attempt is made at all, and treatment remains based on the primary lesion in the breast to determine the prognostic factors of the metastatic lesions, which is a mistake and a violation in the standard of care.

Whatever can be done to make it easier on the patient (biopsies of other organ sites are quite painful) and potentially more accurate in determining the degree of positivity of each metastatic organ site can really go a long way in potentially helping to determine who are the right candidates for this therapy. Those benefiting seem to benefit for a long time, which is wonderful, truly making this disease a chronic illness that is manageable.

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/94756/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
https://www.ejcancer.com/article/S0959-8049(19)30796-8/pdf
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2019.10.024
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Jan 15, 2020 02:52PM umakemehappy wrote:

Things are changing! "Innovators have invented a better way for surgeons to locate tumors during lumpectomies for breast cancer."

https://news.wisc.edu/75-years-later-uw-madison-inventors-aim-to-replace-old-style-breast-surgery-marker/

Dx 6/20/2018, DCIS/IDC, Left, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/2 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ Surgery 7/20/2018 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Targeted Therapy 9/5/2018 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 9/5/2018 Taxol (paclitaxel) Radiation Therapy 12/3/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Hormonal Therapy 1/5/2019 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Jan 16, 2020 12:11AM thisiknow wrote:

umakemehappy ...GPS guided surgery. That's really exciting. For surgeons for sure. Interesting reading. Thanks!

Age 72 @dx - Oncotype 4 & 15 Dx 7/14/2019, DCIS/IDC, Both breasts, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 9/10/2019 Lumpectomy: Left, Right; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy 10/28/2019 Whole-breast: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/18/2019 Arimidex (anastrozole)
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Jan 16, 2020 06:12PM marijen wrote:

Inclusion of endogenous plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate and mammographic density in risk prediction models for breast cancer

Marike Gabrielson, Kumari A. Ubhayaseker, Santosh R. Acharya, Mikael Andersson Franko, Mikael Eriksson, Jonas Bergquist, Kamila Czene and Per Hall


DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-11


Abstract

Background Endogenous hormones and mammographic density are risk factors for breast cancer. Joint analyses of the two may improve the ability to identify high-risk women. Methods This study within the KARMA cohort included pre-diagnostic measures of plasma hormone levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), its sulphate (DHEAS) and mammographic density in 629 cases and 1,223 controls, not using menopausal hormones. We evaluated the area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) for risk of breast cancer by adding DHEA, DHEAS, and mammographic density, to the Gail or Tyrer-Cuzick 5-year risk scores or the CAD2Y 2-year risk score. Results DHEAS and percentage density were independently and positively associated with breast cancer risk (P=0.007 and P<0.001, respectively) for postmenopausal, but not premenopausal, women. No significant association was seen for DHEA. In postmenopausal women, those in the highest tertiles of both DHEAS and density were at greatest risk of breast cancer (odds ratio (OR) 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-6.3) compared to the lowest tertiles. Adding DHEAS significantly improved the AUC for the Gail (+2.1 units, P=0.008) and Tyrer-Cuzick (+1.3 units, P=0.007) risk models. Adding DHEAS to the Gail and Tyrer-Cuzick models already including mammographic density further increased the AUC by 1.2 units, (P=0.006) and 0.4 units (P=0.007), respectively, compared to only including density. Conclusion DHEAS and mammographic density are independent risk factors for breast cancer and improve risk discrimination for postmenopausal breast cancer. Impact Combining DHEAS and mammographic density could help identify women at high risk who may benefit from individualised breast cancer screening and/or preventive measures among postmenopausal women.

  • Received September 11, 2019.
  • Revision received November 6, 2019.
  • Accepted January 10, 2020.
  • Copyright ©2020, American Association for Cancer Research.
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Jan 19, 2020 12:58PM debbew wrote:

Acid reflux drugs may have negative side effects for breast cancer survivors

New Ohio State University research shows an association between breast cancer survivors' use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and reports of problems with concentration and memory. On average, cognitive problems reported by PPI users were between 20 and 29 percent more severe than issues reported by non-PPI users. PPIs are sold under such brand names as Nexium, Prevacid and Prilosec.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200117110840.htm

Study DOI: 10.1007/s11764-019-00815-4

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Jan 20, 2020 04:57PM Kanga_Roo wrote:

Some happy reading!
Immune cell which kills most cancers discovered by accident by British scientists in major breakthrough

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2020/01/20/immune-cell-kills-cancers-discovered-accident-british-scientists/

.

Dx 1/24/2018, IDC, Left, 5cm, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 2/11/2018 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy 2/15/2018 Kisqali
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Jan 20, 2020 06:08PM cowgal wrote:

Interesting article Kanga Roo. From the article it sounds like they plan to start doing human trials maybe in November. I wonder if this is doing well in trials how long we would have to wait before it could be made available...5 to 10 years? I don't know what the timeframes are in the UK for new treatments. Does the UK have the "Right to Try" like the USA now has?

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Jan 20, 2020 06:33PM 2019whatayear wrote:

I hope we here more about this 'new' immune cell! wow! Exciting!

I found myself reading others signatures & comparing my dx to others. I decided to delete my info off my sig, b/c I felt like I was viewing people as their dx vrs. as individuals BRCA-2-BMX 6/25 -chemo 7/24 AC/T
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Jan 20, 2020 09:58PM - edited Jan 20, 2020 10:02PM by debbew

Oh my gosh, billions spent on cancer research and they find this by accident! I hope it lives up to even a fraction of its potential!

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Jan 21, 2020 03:01AM BSandra wrote:

Dear all, what Kanga_Roo posted... That would be so crazy... I don't know even what to say, and although sounds "too easy and good to be true", CAR-T was just the same genius story, which we have already forgotten - we simply use these therapies today. Let's hope for the best, let's hold on!

Husband Saulius

Feb 2019: local recurrence in left breast, IBC. May 2018-Feb 2019: NED. Additional strategies: Omega3:Omega6, Cp lowering, CBD/CBDA, DC/CIK since June 2018 Dx 8/4/2017, IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, Grade 2, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 8/27/2017 Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 3/12/2019 Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 7/22/2019 Mastectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 9/9/2019 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall

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