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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than Breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 20, 2017 10:31PM - edited Nov 20, 2017 10:35PM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Dec 10, 2020 03:19PM - edited Dec 10, 2020 03:19PM by Garnersuz77

Hi!

Can anyone weigh in on the results of today's RxPonder results? I was diagnosed in 2018 premenopausal 1/4 positive nodes and a low Oncotype of 9. I sought out 3 MO opinions and they all said chemo would have little to no benefit to me so I skipped it. The results from this study seem pretty clear that was a terrible decision as the premenopausal group that received chemo plus ET had a 46%!! reduction in metastatic reoccurrence compared to the arm that did ET only. Ugh.

Dx@41; Oncotype 9 Dx 11/2/2018, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, 1/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Radiation Therapy 4/10/2019 Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole), Zoladex (goserelin) Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Dec 10, 2020 05:53PM Lumpie wrote:

Garnersuz77: I read a summary really quickly, but the way I read it, it looked like it changed the risk by maybe 4%. Not nothing, but not huge either. And, of course, (as far as I know,) we didn't have studies before now showing this difference in prognosis. Of course, that is why we need more research. It is great to have all this "smart"/personalized medicine, but if we can't figure out the persons for whom it is smart, we don't really come out ahead. We will get there but... arg... it is to be on the long end of the wait.

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Dec 10, 2020 08:52PM 2019whatayear wrote:

The doctors discussing it were really leaning toward chemo not being of benefit pre or post if 1-3 nodes . They think the difference is mostly due to younger women being thrown into menopause due to chemo so the perceived benefit is more due to the sudden menopause vrs the chemo itself

With a score of 9 the endocrine therapy is what you need -Take heart!

5/6/2019 IDC 2cm, micromet 1/9 nodes, BRCA2+, ER+, PR+, HER- BMX 6/2019, A/C & Taxol 2019, Radiation, BSO - preventative 2/2020, Letrozole 3/1/2020
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Dec 11, 2020 03:06AM JoynerL wrote:

Here's Dr. Kalinsky of Emory University on the subject:

https://www.onclive.com/view/dr-kalinsky-on-initial-results-of-the-rxponder-trial-in-hr-her2--breast-cancer

--Lynn Dx 12/1990, IDC, Left, <1cm, Stage IIA, ER+ Surgery 1/2/1991 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): Nipple reconstruction, Saline implant Chemotherapy 1/15/1991 CMF Hormonal Therapy 6/30/1991 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Hormonal Therapy 10/31/2002 Evista (raloxifene) Dx 2/9/2017, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 3/5/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Targeted Therapy 3/5/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Radiation Therapy 1/9/2019 External: Bone Chemotherapy 1/17/2019 Xeloda (capecitabine) Radiation Therapy 10/27/2020 External: Lymph nodes
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Dec 11, 2020 08:23PM - edited Dec 11, 2020 08:23PM by Garnersuz77

Thank you all very much! I feel better now that I understand it better. The ovarian suppression benefit as a result of chemo vs. a large benefit from the chemo itself make a lot of sense.

Dx@41; Oncotype 9 Dx 11/2/2018, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, 1/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Radiation Therapy 4/10/2019 Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole), Zoladex (goserelin) Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Dec 13, 2020 11:18AM moth wrote:

hold your enthusiasm....


from Annals of Oncology Oct 2020

"Less than 20% (19.3%) of cancer science discoveries touted as breakthrough, landmark, groundbreaking, or highly promising translated into clinical therapy or practice with a median follow up of 15 years. Among clinically adopted treatments in our analysis, most were approved based on surrogate end points and only 9.1% found a survival benefit. Among 8 therapies with an OS benefit, the median benefit provided was 2.8 months. Our results suggest that claims of major discovery are associated only with modest rates of ultimate clinical success."

DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annonc.2020.10.484



Initial dx at 50. Seriously???? “Sometimes the future changes quickly and completely and we’re left with only the choice of what to do next." blog: nevertellmetheodds2017.tumblr.... Dx 12/2017, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 12/12/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Chemotherapy 2/14/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 8/13/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Dx 2/2020, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver/lungs, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy 3/18/2020 Taxol (paclitaxel) Immunotherapy 3/18/2020 Tecentriq (atezolizumab) Chemotherapy 11/25/2020 Abraxane (albumin-bound or nab-paclitaxel) Radiation Therapy 12/9/2020 External Dx 12/10/2020, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, Grade 3, ER+/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 12/15/2020 Femara (letrozole) Dx 1/28/2021, IDC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 3 Radiation Therapy 3/3/2021 External: Bone
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Dec 13, 2020 04:01PM AlabamaDee wrote:

MOTH

Sad report. I don’t even have to read the report to believe that. Those figures pan out in clinical trial reports and even the latest news drugs. Why do they spend so much money on a drug that only gets us OSR of about 3 months (median)

Because of the hope you are one of the few on the outlying edge of the numbers like my sister. She started on opdivo for NSCLC when it first came out and has survived with stable disease for 5 years and going strong.

If they don’t keep trying, they won’t find the right one! I’m thankful for the effort and hope the next breakthrough is the one!

Dee


Primary neuroendocrine breast cancer, on SERD trial ARV-471, failed Pfizer’s CDK 2/4/6 trial after 8 weeks Dx 5/23/2013, Right, 1cm, Stage IIB, Grade 2, 1/22 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Chemotherapy 7/28/2013 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 4/2019, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Targeted Therapy 10/7/2020 Radiation Therapy External Chemotherapy Doxil (doxorubicin) Targeted Therapy Afinitor (everolimus) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole), Aromasin (exemestane), Fareston (toremifene), Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Targeted Therapy Verzenio Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)
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Dec 13, 2020 08:45PM moth wrote:

oligometastatic peeps -

improved OS for those who had surgical resection of primary and oligomets

https://drive.google.com/file/d/18yi0zQK0L4oP5WY4T...


Initial dx at 50. Seriously???? “Sometimes the future changes quickly and completely and we’re left with only the choice of what to do next." blog: nevertellmetheodds2017.tumblr.... Dx 12/2017, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 12/12/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Chemotherapy 2/14/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 8/13/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Dx 2/2020, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver/lungs, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy 3/18/2020 Taxol (paclitaxel) Immunotherapy 3/18/2020 Tecentriq (atezolizumab) Chemotherapy 11/25/2020 Abraxane (albumin-bound or nab-paclitaxel) Radiation Therapy 12/9/2020 External Dx 12/10/2020, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, Grade 3, ER+/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 12/15/2020 Femara (letrozole) Dx 1/28/2021, IDC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 3 Radiation Therapy 3/3/2021 External: Bone
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Dec 13, 2020 09:07PM BevJen wrote:

Moth,

Do you have another link for that article? I can't get it to load -- I just get the spinning wheel. Or do you have an exact title so we can find it ourselves?

Thanks

Microwave Ablations of the Liver: 7/2019; 10/2020; 12/2020 Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, 13/18 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+, HER2- Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 7/31/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Immunotherapy Radiation Therapy Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Chemotherapy TAC Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole)
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Dec 13, 2020 09:24PM moth wrote:

weird I just checked and it's working for me. It's a poster presentation ahead of publication from sabcs.

Someone tweeted a lower quality version here but it doesn't blow up nicely https://twitter.com/stage4kelly/status/13367092193...


Initial dx at 50. Seriously???? “Sometimes the future changes quickly and completely and we’re left with only the choice of what to do next." blog: nevertellmetheodds2017.tumblr.... Dx 12/2017, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 12/12/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Chemotherapy 2/14/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 8/13/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Dx 2/2020, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver/lungs, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy 3/18/2020 Taxol (paclitaxel) Immunotherapy 3/18/2020 Tecentriq (atezolizumab) Chemotherapy 11/25/2020 Abraxane (albumin-bound or nab-paclitaxel) Radiation Therapy 12/9/2020 External Dx 12/10/2020, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, Grade 3, ER+/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 12/15/2020 Femara (letrozole) Dx 1/28/2021, IDC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 3 Radiation Therapy 3/3/2021 External: Bone
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Dec 14, 2020 06:01AM BevJen wrote:

Thanks. That one worked for me and I was able to blow it up a bit from twitter.

Microwave Ablations of the Liver: 7/2019; 10/2020; 12/2020 Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, 13/18 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+, HER2- Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 7/31/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Immunotherapy Radiation Therapy Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Chemotherapy TAC Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole)
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Dec 14, 2020 06:45AM MountainMia wrote:

BevJen, there's been a google problem that includes documents. If you try again later, it might work fine.

The rain comes and the rain goes, but the mountain remains. I am the mountain.
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Dec 14, 2020 10:56AM Lumpie wrote:

Physicians Commonly Miss Adverse Events in Patients With Breast Cancer

Physicians commonly underrecognized adverse events of pain, pruritus, edema, and fatigue that patients with breast cancer experienced after radiotherapy, found a study presented at the 2020 Virtual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

The study included 9868 patients from 29 practices in Michigan who had breast cancer and received radiotherapy after lumpectomy.

Study researchers reviewed 37,593 reports of pain, pruritus, edema, and fatigue from patient reports and compared them with the grade physicians gave the adverse events. Physicians graded adverse events using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE).

Physicians were considered to underrecognize pain if they graded the severity as 0 — that is, absent — and the patient reported the severity as moderate, or if they graded the severity as 1 or lower and the patient reported the severity as severe. Pruritis and edema were considered underrecognized if physicians graded the severity as 0 and patients reported bother often or all of the time. Fatigue was considered underrecognized if physicians graded the severity as 0 and patients reported having significant fatigue most of the time or always.

Compared with White patients, Black patients had a 92% increased odds of having adverse events underrecognized (odds ratio [OR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.65-2.23; P <.001).

Compared with patients aged 60 to 69 years, patients who were younger than 50 years had a 35% increased odds of having adverse events underrecognized (OR, 1.4).

"We need to do a better job — that's really what it is," commented SABCS Codirector Virginia Kaklamani, MD, UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas. "We need to conduct studies where patient-reported outcomes are being reported, and we as physicians need to listen more to our patients."

https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/home/news/con...

Reference: Jagsi R, Griffith KA, Vicini F, et al. Identifying patients whose symptoms are under-recognized during breast radiotherapy: comparison of patient and physician reports of toxicity in a multicenter cohort. Presented at: 2020 Virtual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium; December 8-11, 2020. Abstract GS3-07.

{Stunningly insightful. Many of us have complained about similar issues for years. Access to reporting is at no charge but may require log-in. Not sure about access parameters for prezo. Log in for SABCS may be required.}

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Dec 14, 2020 01:40PM mysticalcity wrote:

Radiation From Wireless Devices May Cause Breast Cancer, New Study Shows

https://childrenshealthdefense.org/defender/radiation-wireless-devices-may-cause-breast-cancer/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC76902...

Dx 3/22/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 6/1/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole) Surgery 6/26/2019 Cryotherapy: Left Radiation Therapy
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Dec 14, 2020 04:35PM MinusTwo wrote:

Posted this on an exercise thread but I think it's worth posting here too.

Physical activity of any intensity, whether folding laundry or jogging, can lower the risk of an early death for middle-aged and older people, a new study suggests. Furthermore, the time of day you move your body could affect risk further.
Researchers analyzed data from 2,795 participants. They identified a group of 781 women with breast
cancer and 865 female controls, and a group of 504 men with prostate cancer and 645 male controls. Both groups responded to a questionnaire relating to their physical activities and gave data on the timing and frequency of their exercises.
The study found that exercising in the morning, between 8-10 a.m., showed the highest benefit in reducing the risk of both breast and prostate cancers. Researchers also found that men who exercised between the hours of 7 and 10 p.m. had a 25 percent lower risk of developing prostate cancer. No benefits from evening activity were seen in the group of women.
"Overall our findings indicate that time of the day of physical activity is an important aspect of physical activity that may potentiate the protective effect of physical activity on cancer risk," the researchers wrote. "The effect of timing of physical activity on cancer risk should be examined in future research with a more detailed assessment of activity patterns, also including occupational activity."

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.33310

2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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Dec 15, 2020 11:59AM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

Complementing the post above is a study in Kenya advocating the benefits of exercise and diet in lowering the risk of BC

https://www.practiceupdate.com/expertopinion/5056/2/1?elsca1=emc_enews_daily-digest&elsca2=email&elsca3=practiceupdate_onc&elsca4=oncology&elsca5=newsletter&rid=NDg2NTE3NjI4ODEyS0&lid=20844069

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Dec 15, 2020 06:26PM MinusTwo wrote:

Interesting BlueGIrl.

2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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Dec 15, 2020 07:22PM - edited Dec 15, 2020 07:28PM by morrigan_2575

this is interesting, it's from a Phase 2b Trial.

https://www.onclive.com/view/gp2-gm-csf-combo-elic...

The GP2 immunotherapy plus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor demonstrated potent responses and a 100% disease-free survival in patients with HER2/neu 3–positive disease who received adjuvant trastuzumab.

Says there's a Phase 3 Trial Coming

Dx 1/20/2020, DCIS/IDC, Right, 4cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 2/5/2020 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 2/5/2020 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 2/5/2020 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Dx 6/19/2020, DCIS/IDC, Right, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 1/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ Surgery 6/19/2020 Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Targeted Therapy 7/6/2020 Kadcyla (T-DM1, ado-trastuzumab) Radiation Therapy 8/10/2020 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Dec 15, 2020 08:54PM debbew wrote:

Alpha-TEA [in phase 1 trial] strikes down advanced breast cancer?

..."The patients with HER2 driven or positive breast cancer, they actually start losing these T-cells and so they lose that immunologic response," explained William Gwin, MD, an assistant professor at University of Washington School of Medicine and breast cancer specialist at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

But now a phase one clinical trial is underway with advanced HER2 positive breast cancer patients for the oral therapy alpha-TEA in combination with the antibody-drug Herceptin. Alpha-TEA works by activating T-cells.

"We can boost those and drive those T-cells that target HER2 and sort of restore that immune response against HER2," elaborated Dr. Gwin.

Attacking cancer cells but leaving the normal cells alone.

"It does seem to have similar effects to chemotherapy, but really without the side effects," Dr. Gwin shared.


https://www.wmcactionnews5.com/2020/12/15/best-life-alpha-tea-strikes-down-advanced-breast-cancer/

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Dec 16, 2020 12:34AM BSandra wrote:

Dear Debbew, this is crazily good news... :) It is interesting what dosages they use (they do not say this in clinical trial)? I already found they use up to 1500 mg/kg/day in dogs:) Saulius

Since Sep2019:NED. Feb2019:local recurrence in left breast,IBC. May2018-Feb2019:NED. Jun2018:DC/CIK. Aug2017:stage IV de novo at age 33. Dx 8/4/2017, IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, Grade 2, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 8/27/2017 Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy 3/12/2019 Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 7/22/2019 Mastectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 9/9/2019 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Dec 16, 2020 12:38AM BSandra wrote:

Found it: ascopubs.org/doi/abs/10.1200/J... Saulius

Since Sep2019:NED. Feb2019:local recurrence in left breast,IBC. May2018-Feb2019:NED. Jun2018:DC/CIK. Aug2017:stage IV de novo at age 33. Dx 8/4/2017, IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, Grade 2, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 8/27/2017 Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy 3/12/2019 Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 7/22/2019 Mastectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 9/9/2019 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Dec 16, 2020 04:13PM debbew wrote:

Thanks for adding that info, Saulius!

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Dec 17, 2020 12:02AM BSandra wrote:

HER2 people, FDA approves Margetuximab!

https://www.onclive.com/view/fda-approves-margetux...

Debbew, I tried to look if one can buy alpha-TEA:) No luck - probably a serious agent, although well known for at least a decade. Actually my motivation is based on assumption that this is something "promising", as they never had clinical trials with alpha-TEA in BC patients, and now start directly with ABC (well, there's evidence in dishes with cell lines). And it is strange this substance is not widely out there, as it is a derivative of vitE. I surely can find folks who could synthesize it here in labs:)) but it would be idiotic to use it without quality control. Trastuzumab resistance is real and it would be so cool to overcome it with this "simple" compound...

Saulius

Since Sep2019:NED. Feb2019:local recurrence in left breast,IBC. May2018-Feb2019:NED. Jun2018:DC/CIK. Aug2017:stage IV de novo at age 33. Dx 8/4/2017, IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, Grade 2, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 8/27/2017 Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 8/28/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy 3/12/2019 Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 7/22/2019 Mastectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 9/9/2019 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Dec 19, 2020 05:25AM JoynerL wrote:

I thought this was interesting:

An update to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) clinical practice guideline on estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer

--Lynn Dx 12/1990, IDC, Left, <1cm, Stage IIA, ER+ Surgery 1/2/1991 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): Nipple reconstruction, Saline implant Chemotherapy 1/15/1991 CMF Hormonal Therapy 6/30/1991 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Hormonal Therapy 10/31/2002 Evista (raloxifene) Dx 2/9/2017, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 3/5/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Targeted Therapy 3/5/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Radiation Therapy 1/9/2019 External: Bone Chemotherapy 1/17/2019 Xeloda (capecitabine) Radiation Therapy 10/27/2020 External: Lymph nodes
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Dec 24, 2020 11:57PM LillyIsHere wrote:

Systemic Therapy for Estrogen Receptor–Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

Harold J. Burstein, M.D., Ph.D.

December 24, 2020

Some of the txt:

In recent years, the options for adjuvant endocrine treatment have broadened beyond tamoxifen. Aromatase inhibitors block the conversion of androgens into estrogens (Figure 1), suppressing residual estrogen levels by more than 90% in postmenopausal women. These agents are contraindicated in premenopausal women who are not undergoing ovarian suppression, because compensatory physiological responses induce ovarian estrogen production. Aromatase inhibitor therapy results in a greater reduction in the risk of recurrence than 5 years of tamoxifen, such that most postmenopausal women should consider aromatase inhibitor treatment either as initial therapy or after 2 to 3 years of tamoxifen. For women presenting with stage I or IIA cancers — the most common stage at diagnosis in countries where screening mammography is routine — the numerical advantage of aromatase inhibitor–based treatment over tamoxifen alone is modest: a 3% reduction in recurrence and a 2% reduction in mortality at 10 years. Aromatase inhibitors are of more value in the treatment of higher-risk cancers (according to stage or biologic features) because of the underlying prognosis39 and in the treatment of lobular cancers. Extending the duration of treatment from 5 to 10 years with either tamoxifen41 or aromatase inhibitors reduces the risk of recurrence, as compared with just 5 years of treatment. Patients at increased risk for a late recurrence because of nodal status or adverse biologic features of the tumor probably derive the greatest benefit from extended therapy; however, extended aromatase inhibitor treatment in years 8 through 10 is likely to confer a modest benefit, at most. The decision to extend therapy should incorporate the patient's preferences, informed by the estimated risk of recurrence beyond year 5, and the toxic effects of therapy to date (Figures 3 and Figure 4).



“Within five years, cancer will have been removed from the list of fatal maladies.” That was the optimistic promise to U.S. President William Howard Taft in 1910 when he visited Buffalo’s Gratwick Laboratory, “What’s taking so long?” Dx 7/31/2019, ILC, Left, <1cm, Stage IIA, 2/5 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- Surgery 9/19/2019 Lymph node removal: Sentinel, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic ovary removal; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Hormonal Therapy 11/30/2019 Femara (letrozole)
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Dec 29, 2020 03:51PM LillyIsHere wrote:

How about this?

Nanoparticle Trains Immune Cells to Attack Cancer
“Within five years, cancer will have been removed from the list of fatal maladies.” That was the optimistic promise to U.S. President William Howard Taft in 1910 when he visited Buffalo’s Gratwick Laboratory, “What’s taking so long?” Dx 7/31/2019, ILC, Left, <1cm, Stage IIA, 2/5 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- Surgery 9/19/2019 Lymph node removal: Sentinel, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic ovary removal; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Hormonal Therapy 11/30/2019 Femara (letrozole)
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Dec 29, 2020 08:14PM debbew wrote:

Cleveland Clinic [triple negative] Breast Cancer Vaccine Goes To Clinical Trials

The shot protects against alpha-lactalbumin, a protein in women's mammary glands that no longer appears after childbearing years but shows up in many cases of triple negative breast cancer, [Dr. Vincent Tuohy, a cancer researcher at the clinic who invented the vaccine] said.

The idea behind taking this vaccine is the body's immune response would destroy cancer cells before they develop and mature, Tuohy said...

In animal trials, the vaccine was shown to be very effective, Tuohy added...

If the trials are successful, Tuohy said he hopes people could eventually get the vaccine as part of their normal preventative care.

\https://www.ideastream.org/news/cleveland-clinic-b...

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Dec 31, 2020 09:45AM BevJen wrote:

Interesting article from the National Cancer Institute about exceptional responders --what they've found out so far.

https://www.cancer.gov/news-events/press-releases/...


Microwave Ablations of the Liver: 7/2019; 10/2020; 12/2020 Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, 13/18 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+, HER2- Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 7/31/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Immunotherapy Radiation Therapy Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Chemotherapy TAC Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole)
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Jan 1, 2021 12:04PM Springdaisy wrote:

I have stage one and had a lumpectomy and just finished radiation. Does anyone know The name of the blood test that shows how many circulating tumor cells are in a persons blood? And is it possible to get that number down to 0? And if it gets down to 0 can aperson stop taking whatever inhibitor they are taking? Just wondering if anybody has had experience with this. Thank you.

Dx 9/2020, ILC, Right, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Hormonal Therapy
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Jan 1, 2021 01:03PM moth wrote:

Springdaisy - Signatera is one brand of the CTC test. AFAIK we don't have enough studies to show if 0 means you can go off hormone therapy.

Breast Cancer Index measures risk of recurrence but it's for AFTER 5 yrs of hormone therapy to see if hormone therapy should be extended. It's not FDA approved. https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/testing/type...


Initial dx at 50. Seriously???? “Sometimes the future changes quickly and completely and we’re left with only the choice of what to do next." blog: nevertellmetheodds2017.tumblr.... Dx 12/2017, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 12/12/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Chemotherapy 2/14/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 8/13/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Dx 2/2020, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver/lungs, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy 3/18/2020 Taxol (paclitaxel) Immunotherapy 3/18/2020 Tecentriq (atezolizumab) Chemotherapy 11/25/2020 Abraxane (albumin-bound or nab-paclitaxel) Radiation Therapy 12/9/2020 External Dx 12/10/2020, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, Grade 3, ER+/PR-, HER2- (IHC) Hormonal Therapy 12/15/2020 Femara (letrozole) Dx 1/28/2021, IDC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 3 Radiation Therapy 3/3/2021 External: Bone

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