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Topic: Stress and Cancer Connection

Forum: Complementary and Holistic Medicine and Treatment — Complementary medicine refers to treatments that are used WITH standard treatment. Holistic medicine is a term used to describe therapies that attempt to treat the patient as a whole person.

Posted on: Jan 10, 2008 07:56AM

lisametoo wrote:

Have any of you done much research on this?  I am heavy into this now, and would appreciate any links I don't already have.  I'm trying to find an appropriate therapy for Mom, that is easy to follow.  I have found the EFT technique, and use it on myself.  Anyone else tried this or anything else?  Does anyone have any comments on a major stressor in their life and then being diagnosed shortly thereafter?  These are really interesting studies I just read on the relationship between what stress does to the body's healing mechanism.  http://www.mind-body.org/cancer%20stress.htm

http://www.mind-body.org/cancer%20stress.htm

Lisa
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Jan 10, 2008 08:41AM - edited Jan 10, 2008 08:41AM by FitChik

Hi Lisa...I'm a firm believer in the mind-body connection and the negative effects of stress on the body. I also believe that environmental factors and nutrition play important roles in both encouraging disease as well as, if used properly, in reducing inflammation and disease. I also believe, for myself, in engaging all sources of healing and therapy in fighting cancer and other life-threatening illnesses. So if the question is...can we be comfortable forgoing traditional therapies in favor of alternative ones, exclusively, I'd have to come out as an opponent. For me, the choice needs to be to use every possible type of ammunition to eradicate my cancer. I do think, however, that each individual is entitled to her/his own choices and should check in with their guts, guided by thorough research, for the answers.

Good question, lisametoo.....

~Marin

"Above all, be the heroine of your life, not the victim." ~Nora Ephron
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Jan 10, 2008 10:36AM lisametoo wrote:

Oh, that was a great answer! Do you incorporate any particular emotional healing modality to your protocol?  My mother and myself are Christians, and of course are praying ALOT.  She is having a little trouble with her faith right now :o( .  I'd really like to get her to try the EFT technique.  She's in Tallahassee right now with my eldest sister, and I'm in Raleigh, N.C. so it's hard to be a long distance care-giver.  My sister is doing all she can, but has a very demanding job, and doesn't get home until later.  Anyhow, I'd be interested in hearing about yours or anyone else's efforts at becoming peaceful!

Thankyou!

Lisa
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Jan 10, 2008 11:55AM genesis wrote:

Dear Lisa,

I know I am always sharing about Schulze's program because of my own experience on how sound it is but we have also incorporated Dr. Jordan Rubin's information as well.  He is the author of "The Maker's Diet".  The book is wonderful and as a Believer I'm sure you would agree.  It covers just about everything and we constantly refer to it.  It addresses the stress factor as well as so many other things in connection with cancer.  You are looking for something easy for your Mom to follow and I think this would maybe be just the thing.....and if you could add Schulze's bowel detox which is easy to do with it she could be well on her way to healing. 

PLEASE know that our prayers are with your whole situation.

Genesis

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Jan 10, 2008 02:42PM - edited Jan 10, 2008 02:44PM by BlindedByScience

Lisa, it seems that meditation of all forms helps us to make endorphins, just as exercise can. You might find prayer to be a meditation and are already doing this, but others do walking meditations, sitting meditations or practice other forms of mindfulness meditation that helps to clear their mind, bring peace for a few moments a day, and strengthen the ability to call up those moments and trigger the release of even more de-stressing chemicals.

Years ago I had practiced a meditation popularized by Jack Kornfield called "LovingKindness". While driving to a doctor appointment, I heard him interviewed on NPR. Just hearing him describe the meditation in passing during his interview brought the memories back & caused my whole body to relax & I felt as if I had been sitting in my living room practicing. It was so calming, I had to pull over because I wasn't focused & tense enough to drive. I'd say that was a pretty strongly developed association for me.

What I had elected to study were buddhist meditations, but they were taught without the tenets of the religion, just as yoga is often taught. This might be something worthwhile to incorporate into an overall plan. 

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Jan 11, 2008 06:27AM Blundin2005 wrote:

Hi Lisa,

Music is an effective method for meditative relaxation. A science was built around the affects. Steven Halpern writes music specific for this purpose and there are many other musicians who do the same. There are some really wonderful meditative tapes by Thich Nhat Hahn. One of my favorites is "Teachings on Love".

So much of the benefits taken from these practices are guided by the personality and comfort levels of the individual who does the practice. There is no right or wrong answer to this question. I took lessons of Tai Chi with my mother ... she enjoyed it very much. She'd never do it on her own, but enjoys to do these types of things with others. She'll be 89 next year and began painting water colors two years ago. This she'll do on her own...as well she likes to write poetry. Writing can be a meditative practice. I do meditative exercises with my son that are similar to Tai Chi and GGong. I like the movement. Other people might be more comfortable with being more still. I also practice Reiki.

Best wishes to all...as always




DX 15 Aug '05, Stage1/grade1, 1.5 cm, IDC/DCIS, 0/2 nodes, ER+PR-,HER2 5%; Dx Oct 2008 bladder papilloma low grade; Dx 07/2013 Stage 2b; t3 M0, 2.0 cm lung cancer, rt. upper lobe
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Jan 16, 2008 08:30AM lisametoo wrote:

Here is more on stress and the cancer connection.  This is a really good website.  http://www.cancerfightingstrategies.com/stress.html
Lisa
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Jan 17, 2008 05:18AM Bliz wrote:

Just received Dr. Christine Horner's book.  She talks about the connection of an emotional upheavel or shock about the time we believe our cancer started. 

I know this happened to me.  I am not sure what could have been done differently as I took care of myself, went to counseling etc. 

Has anyone else experienced this?

Dx 6/13/2007, IDC, <1cm, Stage I, Grade 1, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jan 19, 2008 09:16AM DGHoff wrote:

Hi Lisa,

I'm pretty sure that stress played an important factor in my own cancer's rapid growth. I had fibrocystic tissue in my breasts for about five years. I kept getting ultrasounds to have the lumps checked out, but nothing appeared as recently as summer of 2005. Then in the next couple of years, life got really crazy for me through a series of car accidents, concerns over my son's development, moving my parents after my father's stroke, the death of a close friend's daughter, and a few other issues. It was a very stressful time period, and I know I didn't follow my exercise and yoga as closely as I should have. It was all very sporadic with no real plan. Then, this summer, I noticed that all of my lumps seemed larger, and I had a new lump. So, in just two years time, I went from having nothing noticeable on the ultrasound to having a stage III tumor which showed up very easily on ultrasound.

Now, exercise is my huge stress reliever as well as yoga and breathing meditation. I also play guitar and write music which is a great way to use the stress I have for something creative and good. If I have a problem I'm wrestling with, I write a song about it, and it feels like the weight is lifted off my shoulders. Even just writing in a journal is helpful. Sometimes just releasing the words to paper and sending them out of my body is enough to relieve the stress.

DeAnn

Dx 6/14/2007, IDC, 6cm+, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 7/8 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ Dx 12/23/2015, IDC, 3cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver/lungs, 7/8 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (FISH) Targeted Therapy 1/7/2016 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 1/7/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/7/2016 Taxol (paclitaxel)
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Jan 19, 2008 10:06AM lisametoo wrote:

Thanks for all your replies.  I read an article this morning about someone writing a book on centarians (people that live to 100), and they all had ONE thing in common.  They reacted to life's stress with an accepting attitude ALL THE TIME!  Fascinating. 

Lisa
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Jun 14, 2017 11:54AM Summer9125 wrote:

YES!! Omg, I LOOOVE EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique).

I took a class in it while undergoing medical treatments for a recurrent tumor, and I totally fell in love with it. I found it easy to use EFT alongside conventional medical treatments. It was great at relieving my avalanche of fears/worries/anxieties, and increased my ability to cope with stress. Although I took a class, I also found that there are complete tutorials available for free online on EFT, since the founder of the program wanted to make sure that anyone who wanted it, could have free access to this self-help technique.

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Jan 21, 2018 11:19AM Roaming_Star wrote:

Hi, I too am convinced that prolonged stress and grief played a big role in my body succumbing to the cancer. I am working with a Naturopathic Oncologist and he has put me on low does naltrexone. When i was doing research on it i found this article Dr. Bernard Bihari, low dose naltrexone, cancer and the immune system . For me this was an awe ha moment! Hopefully this link will work. If not message me for the pdf.

Diagnosed at age 46. Taking low dose naltrexone as 30% of cancer patients have low endorphins impacting the body's immune system to kill cancer stem cells. Dx 5/24/2017, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 6/9/2017 AC + T (Taxol) Surgery 11/24/2017 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy Dx 12/6/2017, LCIS/IDC/IDC: Tubular, Left, 1cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 2, 6/16 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Radiation Therapy 2/5/2018 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall Hormonal Therapy 3/14/2018 Femara (letrozole)
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Apr 14, 2018 10:45AM Roaming_Star wrote:

Just thought I would post more information that I have discovered about stress and cancer. In my case I grew up in an highly abusive home. I scored 9/10 on the Adverse Childhood Experience test (google this to find out more information). I have learned that growing up in this type of environment where prolonged stress is abundant that this changes the developing brain making the adult brain mre susceptible to stress. Also the brain then is always on high arousal causing inflammation. Chronic inflammation destroys the immune system and is a precursor for many diseases including heart problems, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, depression, alzheimers, schizophrenia, cand cancer.

You don't have to have a bad childhood to have chronic stress! I have lots of research on the link btw chronic stress and cancer/immune function. Now i am focusing on natural things that lower my inflammation in my body. Hopefully this will help my body fight the cancer....

Diagnosed at age 46. Taking low dose naltrexone as 30% of cancer patients have low endorphins impacting the body's immune system to kill cancer stem cells. Dx 5/24/2017, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 6/9/2017 AC + T (Taxol) Surgery 11/24/2017 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy Dx 12/6/2017, LCIS/IDC/IDC: Tubular, Left, 1cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 2, 6/16 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Radiation Therapy 2/5/2018 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall Hormonal Therapy 3/14/2018 Femara (letrozole)
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Jun 18, 2018 09:30PM - edited Jul 16, 2018 01:32PM by Sunny48

This Post was deleted by Sunny48.
Dx 6/9/2018, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-
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Jun 30, 2018 09:28AM - edited Jul 16, 2018 01:32PM by Sunny48

This Post was deleted by Sunny48.
Dx 6/9/2018, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-
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Jun 30, 2018 10:55AM waytooanxiousmommy wrote:

I was already doing intense trauma therapy and reading like crazy about trauma and ptsd due to highly stressful situations in my life before being diagnosed with cancer. One of the leading experts in PTSD in Dr Van Der Kolk and his book "the body keeps the score" has detailed explanations about the physical changes to the body from trauma and also describes different methods of healing

https://www.amazon.com/Body-Keeps-Score-Healing-Tr...

Reading about cancer I know that normal cells only use sugar under high stress but cancer cells do that all the time. They are stuck in a high stress state and send out all these crazy signals as if they are in an emergency to survive which causes them to grow like they do.

While I don't think the cure for cancer is being hidden by the drug companies I do think there is no incentive for drug companies to invent a drug that isn't a money maker for them. This is why there is not much solid research into alternative therapies and unfortunately there are a lot of people who will take advantage of cancer patients with promises of miracle alternative therapies.

Here are some things that I am doing:

- Exercising 30 minutes every day and eating well

- I go to group therapy for trauma twice a week

- I go to individual therapy once a week

- I go to Al Anon which I feel is a great way to let go of stress. I am not in a relationship with an alcoholic but cancer is exactly like an alcoholic, unpredictable and wreaks havoc on your life. I have found a lot of peace and serenity from that program and its totally free to go

- I go to a cancer support group once a week

I am a single mom, in cancer treatment, no family where I live and no job right now but I feel centered, peaceful and happy due to the above list of things


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Aug 3, 2018 07:41PM 1redgirl wrote:

Both times I got BC I was under a lot of stress and sadness. I was 40 the first time dealing with my parents illnesses and death, plus my niece and my sister’s beginning spiral into alcoholism and death. I also had moved a few times in those few years, and lived away from home and family for many months taking care of sick mom. My crappy back was killing me from lifting mom, etc. I was not the least bit surprised I was sick.

This last time was accumulation of 2 very sad years. 3 events that just crushed me. I admit I do not handle loss well. However, having decided to once again refuse toxic chemicals to fix me, I really am in a good place. I have let go. I just cannot fix everything and everybody. I am too old, 66, and what time I have left I want to be at peace. I am having a great summer. Loving every minute. Just had a physical, 3 mos after my mastectomy and all is good. I feel great. I am stopping to smell the roses. I avoid what I cannot fix. One day at a time. Seriously, our summer weather has been glorious.

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