We are 196,325 members in 81 forums discussing 144,696 topics.

Help with Abbreviations

All TopicsForum: Complementary and Holistic Medicine and Treatment → Topic: Maitake D Fraction modulates tumor progression

Topic: Maitake D Fraction modulates tumor progression

Forum: Complementary and Holistic Medicine and Treatment — Complementary medicine refers to treatments that are used WITH standard treatment. Holistic medicine is a term used to describe therapies that attempt to treat the patient as a whole person.

Posted on: May 16, 2017 12:47PM - edited May 17, 2017 10:35AM by Husband11

Husband11 wrote:

What is Maitake D fraction?

It is an extract made from the edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa (maitake). It is available in both liquid and pill form. It grows in China, Japan and North America. It is a major culinary mushroom in Japan. The D extract concentrates a particular fraction rich in beta glucans, which shows promise as both an immune stimulant, and direct anti cancer agent. Research is ongoing.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27892708

Nutr Cancer. 2017 Jan;69(1):29-43. doi: 10.1080/01635581.2017.1247891. Epub 2016 Nov 28. Antitumoral Effects of D-Fraction from Grifola Frondosa (Maitake) Mushroom in Breast Cancer.

Alonso EN1, Ferronato MJ1, Gandini NA1, Fermento ME1, Obiol DJ1, López Romero A2, Arévalo J3, Villegas ME1, Facchinetti MM1, Curino AC1.

Author information Abstract

D-Fraction is protein-bound β-1,6 and β-1,3 glucans (proteoglucan) extracted from the edible and medicinal mushroom Grifola frondosa (Maitake). The antitumoral effect of D-Fraction has long been exclusively attributed to their immunostimulatory capacity. However, in recent years increasing evidence showed that D-Fraction directly affects the viability of canine and human tumor cells, independent of the immune system. Previously, we have reported that D-Fraction modulates the expression of genes associated with cell proliferation, cell death, migration, invasion, and metastasis in MCF7 human breast cancer cells. Therefore, the purpose of the current study is to investigate if this modulation of gene expression by Maitake D-Fraction really modulates tumor progression. In the present work, we demonstrate for the first time that Maitake D-Fraction is able to act directly on mammary tumor cells, modulating different cellular processes involved in the development and progression of cancer. We demonstrate that D-Fraction decreases cell viability, increases cell adhesion, and reduces the migration and invasion of mammary tumor cells, generating a less aggressive cell behavior. In concordance with these results, we also demonstrate that D-Fraction decreases tumor burden and the number of lung metastases in a murine model of breast cancer.

PMID:
27892708


Optimal Dosage?


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19253021


J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2009 Sep;135(9):1215-21. doi: 10.1007/s00432-009-0562-z. Epub 2009 Mar 1.

A phase I/II trial of a polysaccharide extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) in breast cancer patients: immunological effects.

Deng G1, Lin H, Seidman A, Fornier M, D'Andrea G, Wesa K, Yeung S, Cunningham-Rundles S, Vickers AJ, Cassileth B.

Author information Abstract BACKGROUND:

Cancer patients commonly use dietary supplements to "boost immune function". A polysaccharide extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake extract) showed immunomodulatory effects in preclinical studies and therefore the potential for clinical use. Whether oral administration in human produces measurable immunologic effects, however, is unknown.

METHODS:

In a phase I/II dose escalation trial, 34 postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free of disease after initial treatment, were enrolled sequentially in five cohorts. Maitake liquid extract was taken orally at 0.1, 0.5, 1.5, 3, or 5 mg/kg twice daily for 3 weeks. Peripheral blood was collected at days -7, 0 (prior to the first dosing), 7, 14, and 21 for ex vivo analyses. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability.

RESULTS:

No dose-limiting toxicity was encountered. Two patients withdrew prior to completion of the study due to grade I possibly related side effects: nausea and joint swelling in one patient; rash and pruritus in the second. There was a statistically significant association between Maitake and immunologic function (p < 0.0005). Increasing doses of Maitake increased some immunologic parameters and depressed others; the dose-response curves for many endpoints were non-monotonic with intermediate doses having either immune enhancing or immune suppressant effects compared with both high and low doses.

CONCLUSIONS:

Oral administration of a polysaccharide extract from Maitake mushroom is associated with both immunologically stimulatory and inhibitory measurable effects in peripheral blood. Cancer patients should be made aware of the fact that botanical agents produce more complex effects than assumed, and may depress as well as enhance immune function.

PMID:
19253021
PMCID:
PMC3751581
DOI:
10.1007/s00432-009-0562-z


Further work on dosage at 6mg/kg daily:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25351719


Cancer Immunol Immunother. 2015 Feb;64(2):237-47. doi: 10.1007/s00262-014-1628-6. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

Maitake mushroom extract in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): a phase II study.

Wesa KM1, Cunningham-Rundles S, Klimek VM, Vertosick E, Coleton MI, Yeung KS, Lin H, Nimer S, Cassileth BR.

Author information Abstract BACKGROUND:

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis with dysplastic bone marrow leading to peripheral cytopenia, risk of infection, and progression to acute myelogenous leukemia. Maitake mushroom beta-glucan, a dietary supplement, stimulates hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production, and recovery of peripheral blood leukocytes after bone marrow injury. This phase II trial examined the effects of Maitake on innate immune function in MDS.

METHODS:

Myelodysplastic syndromes patients with International Prognostic Scoring System Low- and Intermediate-1-risk disease received oral Maitake extract at 3 mg/kg twice daily for 12 weeks. Primary endpoints included neutrophil count and function tested as endogenous or stimulated neutrophil production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by flow cytometry compared with age-matched healthy controls (HC). ROS activators were Escherichia coli, phorbol ester, and the bacterial peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Complete blood counts, chemistry panels, iron studies, and monocyte function were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Of 21 patients enrolled, 18 completed the study and were evaluable. Maitake increased endogenous (basal) neutrophil (p = 0.005) and monocyte function (p = 0.021). Pre-treatment monocyte response to E. coli was reduced in MDS patients compared with HC (p = 0.002) and increased (p = 0.0004) after treatment. fMLP-stimulated ROS production response also increased (p = 0.03). Asymptomatic eosinophilia occurred in 4 patients (p = 0.014). Other changes in albumin, hemoglobin, and total protein were not clinically relevant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maitake was well tolerated. Enhanced in vitro neutrophil and monocyte function following treatment demonstrate that Maitake has beneficial immunomodulatory potential in MDS. Further study is warranted.

PMID:
25351719
PMCID:
PMC4317517
DOI:
10.1007/s00262-014-1628-6

Concerned husband Dx 2008, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 7/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 5/2016, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)
Log in to post a reply

Page 1 of 1 (7 results)

Posts 1 - 7 (7 total)

Log in to post a reply

May 16, 2017 12:53PM - edited May 16, 2017 03:15PM by Husband11

Want more information?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=maitake+...


Concerned husband Dx 2008, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 7/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 5/2016, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)
Log in to post a reply

May 16, 2017 03:58PM - edited May 16, 2017 04:02PM by Husband11

An interesting read by Hiroaki Nanba, Ph.D.


http://orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1997/article...

or download in pdf

http://orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1997/pdf/199...


Also, a book on the general subject of medicinal mushrooms that I find very helpful.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Medicinal-Mushrooms-Clini...






Concerned husband Dx 2008, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 7/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 5/2016, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)
Log in to post a reply

May 18, 2017 04:18AM - edited May 18, 2017 04:19AM by ShetlandPony

Can the maitake mushroom be purchased at stores or online? I don't care for supplements, but I would cook and eat the mushrooms.


2011 Stage I ILC ER+PR+ Her2- 1.5 cm grade 1, ITCs sn. Lumpectomy, radiation, tamoxifen. 2014 Stage IV ILC ER+PR+Her2- grade 2, mets to breast, liver, retroperitoneal nodes. Taxol NEAD. 2015,2016 Ibrance+letrozole. 2017 Faslodex+Afnitor; Xeloda
Log in to post a reply

May 18, 2017 04:55AM ChiSandy wrote:

I occasionally see maitake in the produce section of higher-end supermarkets—including Mariano’s and Whole Foods.

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/22/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/1/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/30/2015 Femara (letrozole)
Log in to post a reply

May 18, 2017 09:20AM - edited May 19, 2017 12:04PM by Husband11

You can buy them in dry form from Oregon Mushrooms. Hot water extraction is believed to be the best way to free up the most of the active ingredients (polysaccharides). So that typically means making a tea from it.

Concerned husband Dx 2008, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 7/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 5/2016, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)
Log in to post a reply

May 18, 2017 04:31PM - edited May 18, 2017 04:39PM by Husband11

Here is a good article on the subject of whole mushroom vs extracts. Despite promoting their own products, it jibes with everything I've read about medicinal use of mushrooms. Only extracts are useful.

https://oriveda.wordpress.com/what-you-should-know...

http://supplement-facts.org/2012-6.php#.WR4E6-vyu7...

https://mushroomscience.com/hot-water-extracted/

Home extraction techniques:

https://blog.mountainroseherbs.com/mushroom-double...


Concerned husband Dx 2008, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 7/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 5/2016, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)
Log in to post a reply

Oct 20, 2017 01:53PM Husband11 wrote:

Recent research on maitake and breast cancer:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28765878

Send to

Int J Mol Med. 2017 Oct;40(4):1089-1095. doi: 10.3892/ijmm.2017.3081. Epub 2017 Jul 26.

Grifola frondosa polysaccharides induce breast cancer cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway.

Zhang Y1, Sun D2, Meng Q3, Guo W1, Chen Q1, Zhang Y1.

Author information Abstract

Grifola frondosa, a type of food and medical fungus, has been shown to exhibit various pharmacological activities, including anticancer effects. As the most typical cancer diagnosed among female patients, breast cancer remains a huge concern threatening human health globally. In the present study, the anti-breast cancer effects of Grifola frondosa polysaccharides (GFPs) and the underlying mechanisms were investigated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, as well as in nude mice bearing MCF-7 tumor xenografts. GFPs exerted cytotoxic effects on the cells, as indicated by a decrease in cell viability, and an increase in the apoptototic rate, lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species accumulation, inducing mitochondrial dysfunction. The increased expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-8, and the reduced levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-extra large (Bcl‑xL) were observed in the cells incubated with GFPs and in the tumor tissues of the mice treated with GFPs. Moreover, the GFPs significantly suppressed the phosphorylation of AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3β and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in a time-dependent manner. Finally, the inhibition of MCF-7 tumor xenograft growth further confirmed the anti-breast cancer effects of GFPs. All these findings revealed that GFPs induced human breast cancer cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway, and provide experimental evidence to support the use of Grifola frondosa as a potential treatment for breast cancer.

Concerned husband Dx 2008, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 7/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 5/2016, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy Ibrance (palbociclib) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)

Page 1 of 1 (7 results)