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Topic: Why don't Chinese women get breast cancer?

Forum: Stage IV/Metastatic Breast Cancer ONLY —

A place for those managing the ups & downs of a Stage IV/metastatic breast cancer diagnosis. Please respect that this forum is for Stage IV members only. There is a separate forum For Family and Caregivers of People with a STAGE IV Diagnosis.

Posted on: Feb 2, 2011 01:44PM

MCTHO wrote:

 Someone forwarded this article to me.  I thought it was rather interesting.  Check it out.

Prof Jane Plant

WHY WOMEN IN CHINA DO NOT GET BREAST CANCER 
By Prof. Jane Plant, PhD, CBE


I had no alternative but to die or to try to find a cure for myself. I am a scientist - surely there was a rational explanation for this cruel illness that affects one in 12 women in the UK ?

I had suffered the loss of one breast, and undergone  radiotherapy. I was now receiving painful chemotherapy, and had been seen by some of the country's most eminent specialists. But, deep down, I felt certain I was facing death. I had a loving husband, a beautiful home and two young children to care for. I desperately wanted to live.

Fortunately, this desire drove me to  unearth the facts, some of which were known only to a handful of scientists at the time.

Anyone who has come into contact with breast cancer will know that certain risk factors - such as increasing age, early onset of womanhood, late onset of menopause and a family history of breast cancer - are completely out of our control. But there are many risk factors, which we can control easily.

These "controllable" risk factors readily translate into  simple changes that we can all make in our day-to-day lives to help prevent or treat breast cancer. My message is that even advanced breast cancer can be overcome because I have done it.

The first clue to understanding what was promoting my breast  cancer came when my husband Peter, who was also a scientist, arrived back from working in China while I was being plugged in for a chemotherapy session.

He had brought with him cards and  letters, as well as some amazing herbal suppositories, sent by my friends and science colleagues in China .

The suppositories  were sent to me as a cure for breast cancer. Despite the awfulness of the situation, we both had a good belly laugh, and I remember saying that this was the treatment for breast cancer in China , then it was little wonder that Chinese women avoided getting the disease.

Those words echoed in my mind.


 
 Why didn't Chinese women in  China get breast cancer?


 
I had collaborated once with Chinese colleagues on a study of links between soil chemistry and disease, and I remembered some of the statistics.

The disease was virtually non-existent throughout the whole country. Only one in 10,000 women in China will die from it, compared to that terrible figure of one in 12 in Britain and the even grimmer average of one in 10 across most Western countries.


 
It is not just a matter of China being a more rural country, with less urban pollution. In highly urbanized Hong Kong , the rate rises to 34 women in every 10,000 but still puts the West to shame.

The Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki  have similar rates. And remember, both cities were attacked withnuclear weapons, so in addition to the usual pollution-related cancers, one would also expect to find some radiation-related cases, too.

The conclusion we can draw from these statistics strikes you with some force. If a Western woman were to move to industrialized, irradiated Hiroshima , she would slash her risk of contracting breast cancer by half. Obviously this is absurd.

It seemed obvious to me that some lifestyle factor not related to pollution, urbanization or the environment is seriously increasing the Western woman's chance of contracting breast cancer.

I then discovered that whatever causes the huge differences in breast cancer rates between oriental and Western countries, it isn't genetic.

Scientific research showed that when Chinese or Japanese people move to the West, within one or two generations their rates of breast cancer approach those of their host community.

The same thing happens when oriental people adopt a completely Western lifestyle in Hong Kong . In fact, the slang name for breast cancer in China translates as 'Rich Woman's Disease'. This is because, in China , only the better off can afford to eat what is termed ' Hong Kong food'.

The Chinese describe all Western food, including everything from ice cream and chocolate bars to spaghetti  and feta cheese, as "Hong Kong food", because of its availability in the former British colony and its scarcity, in the past, in mainland  China .

So it made perfect sense to me that whatever  was causing my breast cancer  and the shockingly high incidence in this country generally, it was almost certainly something to do with our better-off, middle-class, Western lifestyle.

There is an important point for men here, too. I have observed in my research that much of the data about prostate cancer leads to similar conclusions.

According to figures from the World Health Organization, the number of men contracting prostate cancer in rural China is negligible, only 0.5 men in every 100,000.

In England ,  Scotland and Wales , however, this figure is 70 times higher. Like breast cancer, it is a middle-class disease that primarily attacks the wealthier and higher socio-economic groups, those that can afford to eat rich foods.

I remember saying to my husband, "Come on Peter, you have just come back  from China . What is it about the Chinese way of life that is so different?"

Why don't they get breast cancer?'
We decided to utilize our joint scientific backgrounds and approach it  logically.

We examined scientific data that pointed us in the general direction of fats in diets.
Researchers had discovered in the 1980s that only l4% of calories in the average Chinese diet were from fat, compared to almost 36% in the West.
But the diet I had been living on for years before I contracted breast cancer was very low in fat and high in fibre.
Besides, I knew as a scientist that fat intake in adults has not been shown to increase risk for breast cancer in most investigations that have followed large groups of women for up to a dozen years.
Then one day something rather special happened. Peter and I have worked together so closely over the years that I am not sure which one of us first said: 

"The Chinese don't eat dairy products!"
It is hard to explain to a non-scientist the sudden mental and emotional 'buzz' you get when you know you have had an important insight. It's as if you have had a lot of pieces of a jigsaw in your mind, and suddenly, in a few seconds, they all fall into place and the whole picture is clear.

Suddenly I recalled how many Chinese people were physically unable to  tolerate milk, how the Chinese people I had worked with had always said that milk was only for babies, and how one of my close friends, who is of Chinese origin, always politely turned down the cheese course at dinner parties.

I knew of no Chinese people who lived a traditional Chinese life who ever used cow or other dairy food to feed their babies. The tradition was to use a wet nurse but never, ever, dairy products.

Culturally, the Chinese find our Western preoccupation with milk and milk products very   strange. I remember entertaining a large delegation of Chinese scientists shortly after the ending of the Cultural Revolution in the 1980s.

On advice from the Foreign Office, we had asked the caterer to provide a pudding that contained a lot of ice cream. After inquiring what the pudding consisted of, all of the Chinese, including their interpreter, politely but firmly refused to eat it, and they could not be persuaded to change their minds.

At the time we were all delighted and ate extra portions!

Milk, I discovered, is one of the most common causes of food allergies .

Over 70% of the world's population are unable to digest the milk sugar, lactose, which has led nutritionists to believe that this is the normal condition for adults, not some sort of deficiency. Perhaps nature is trying to tell us that we are eating the wrong food.

Before I had breast cancer for the first time, I had eaten a lot of dairy produce, such as skimmed milk, low-fat cheese and yogurt. I had used it as my main source of protein. I also ate cheap but lean minced beef, which I now realized was probably often ground-up dairy cow.

In order to cope with the chemotherapy I received for my fifth case of cancer, I had been eating organic yogurts as a way of helping my digestive tract to recover and repopulate my gut with 'good' bacteria.

Recently, I discovered that way back in 1989 yogurt had been implicated in ovarian cancer. Dr Daniel Cramer of Harvard University studied hundreds of women with ovarian cancer, and had them record in detail what they normally ate. Wish I'd been made aware of his findings when he had first discovered them.


Following Peter's and my insight into the Chinese diet, I decided to give up not just yogurt but all dairy produce immediately. Cheese, butter, milk and yogurt and anything else that contained dairy produce - it went down the sink or in the rubbish.


It is surprising how many products, including commercial soups, biscuits and cakes, contain some form of dairy produce. Even many proprietary brands of margarine marketed as soya, sunflower or olive oil spreads can contain dairy produce
.
I therefore became an avid reader of the small print on food labels.

Up to this point, I had been steadfastly measuring the progress of my fifth cancerous lump with callipers and plotting the results. Despite all the encouraging comments and positive feedback from my doctors and nurses, my own precise observations told me the bitter truth.

My first chemotherapy sessions had produced no effect - the lump was still the same size.


Then I eliminated dairy products. Within days, the lump started to shrink
.
About two weeks after my second chemotherapy session and one week after giving up dairy produce, the lump in my neck started to itch. Then it began to soften and to reduce  in size. The line on the graph, which had shown no change, was now pointing downwards as the tumour got smaller and smaller.

And, very significantly, I noted that instead of declining exponentially (a graceful curve) as cancer is meant to do, the tumour's decrease in size was plotted on a straight line heading off the bottom of the graph, indicating a cure, not suppression (or remission) of the tumour.

One Saturday afternoon after about six weeks of excluding all dairy produce from my diet, I practised an hour of meditation then felt for what was left of the lump. I couldn't find it. Yet I was very experienced at detecting cancerous lumps - I had discovered all five cancers on my own. I went downstairs and asked my husband to feel my neck. He could not find any trace of the lump either.

On the following Thursday I was due to be seen by my cancer specialist at   Charing Cross Hospital in London . He examined me thoroughly, especially my neck where the tumour had been. He was initially bemused and then delighted as he said, "I cannot find it." None of my doctors, it appeared, had expected someone with my type and stage of cancer (which had clearly spread to the lymph system) to survive, let alone be so hale and hearty.

My specialist was as overjoyed as I was. When I first discussed my ideas with him he was understandably sceptical. But I understand that he now uses maps showing cancer mortality in China in his lectures, and recommends a non-dairy diet to his cancer patients.

I now believe that the link between dairy produce and breast cancer is similar to the link between smoking and lung cancer.

I believe that identifying the link between breast cancer and dairy produce, and then developing a diet specifically targeted at maintaining the health of my breast and hormone system, cured me.

It was difficult for me, as it may be for you, to accept that a substance as 'natural' as milk might have such ominous health implications. But I am a living proof that it works and, starting from tomorrow, I shall reveal the secrets of my revolutionary action plan.

Extracted from Your Life in Your Hands, by Professor Jane Plan

Dx 7/2009, IDC, Stage IV, Grade 3, 1/1 nodes, mets, ER-/PR-, HER2+
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Feb 2, 2011 02:29PM - edited Feb 2, 2011 06:52PM by 3monstmama

All interesting except as far as the no consumption of dairy in China part, its just not correct.  There may not be as much consumption of dairy but especially in the north, it is still consumed and not just by children. Yogurt drinks are VERY popular in China and have been forever.  In Beijing one buys it on the street in a crock--you drink it with a straw and then return the crock. 

After 6 trips to China, I'd say the biggest difference is in the amount of exercise and the amount of calories and the amount of meat.  A traditional meal in China is way way way heavier on the veggies versus in the US.  Meat as condiment, as my DH puts it.  And everyone walks or goes to the exercise park--being overweight is a whole new thing there and most common with people who are more westernized.

 editted to add:  After some further thought today I realized that I actually know someone in China whose sister had breast cancer.  They are a very traditional family so not big dairy consumers and yet.  Given that I only know about 10 people in China [and one of those is a Canadian] I'm thinking the stats on breast cancer in China are not what is described in the story.

I agree with someone else:breast cancer is a perfect storm of events.  As much as I would like to pick one thing to blame it on [not merely so I can solve my situation but also to enable me to "save" my daughter from the same thing], I don't think its possible.  The fact remains that human bodies are simply vastly more complicated than we humans would like to believe.

Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.
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Feb 2, 2011 02:51PM imbell wrote:

They don't eat things in boxes made with 14 chemicals and fructose. Our convenience foods are killng us. My mother drank whole milk, used butter not margarine and real sour cream. Nothing was low fat or sugar free. She lived to be 91. I got cancer at 63.

Dx 9/10/2009, IDC, 5cm, Stage IV, Grade 3, 5/17 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Feb 2, 2011 04:18PM barbe1958 wrote:

I believe it's the fact that they grew up eating soy. Natural soy. Soy as it should be. I am lactose intolerant and don't use dairy, but I got cancer anyway! I brought my kids up without milk, I used water instead. They are now 28 and 30, I pray I've done something right....
Dx 12/10/2008, IDC: Papillary, Left, 1cm, Stage IB, 2/5 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 12/15/2008 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right Dx 2/4/2016, IDC: Papillary, Left, Stage IV, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 2/10/2016 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 2/16/2016 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Feb 2, 2011 05:49PM Bernicky wrote:

Junk science is still junk science when a professor does it. If it's all about dairy may I ask why there isn't a much lower rate of breast cancer among those who are lactose intolerant. In Canada there has been discussion about Inuit women who have a much lower rate of breast cancer which has been attributed to early pregnancy and much longer breast feeding before a child is weened as well as a diet high in marine fat. Cancer rates are also lower among tribal populations in Africa.  

www.dnafiles.org/outreach/ethn... 

Is a much more interesting read. 

Denis - www.bernicky.com/blog - Life its own self.
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Feb 2, 2011 06:10PM oakley wrote:

Interesting read, but I'm wary of this.  Especially because not so long ago China had a major issue with contaminated milk and dairy products.  They definitely eat/drink dairy there:

Timeline: China milk scandal

Dangerously high levels of the industrial chemical melamine in powdered baby milk and other dairy products in China sparked worldwide safety concerns. 

Dx 10/27/2010, IDC, <1cm, Stage IB, Grade 2, 0/7 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Feb 2, 2011 06:21PM Fitztwins wrote:

Chinese women have a hell of a lot other things to worry about. LIke making it to adulthood.

I have heard this before. I think that cancer is the perfect storm. Lots of crap going wrong.

Enjoy Every Sandwich. Dx 12/12/2004, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/lungs, Grade 2, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (FISH) Surgery 1/19/2005 Lymph node removal: Left, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): Free TRAM flap Chemotherapy 2/1/2005 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 5/1/2005 Breast, Lymph nodes Targeted Therapy 6/1/2005 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Hormonal Therapy 1/1/2006 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy 6/2/2008 Aromasin (exemestane) Targeted Therapy 7/1/2008 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Hormonal Therapy 6/15/2013 Arimidex (anastrozole) Targeted Therapy 9/5/2015 Perjeta (pertuzumab)
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Feb 2, 2011 06:40PM ScienceGirl wrote:

I agree that dairy should be eliminated from the diet of those of us with BC. 

Milk is for infants.  We didn't evolve drinking milk as adults we have been brainwashed to beleive that it's part of a healthy diet.   It doesn't make sense - we are drinking the breast milk of another species as adults.

Kim Dx 11/17/2010, 2cm, Stage IB, Grade 2, 0/5 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 11/29/2010 Lymph node removal: Left, Right, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right Chemotherapy 1/12/2011 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Radiation Therapy 3/31/2011 Breast Hormonal Therapy 3/31/2011 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Dx 5/21/2014, ILC/IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 5/31/2014 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 6/5/2014 Hormonal Therapy 11/30/2015 Aromasin (exemestane) Hormonal Therapy 3/17/2016 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Targeted Therapy 3/17/2016 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy 10/9/2016 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Chemotherapy 11/17/2016 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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Feb 2, 2011 06:46PM lago wrote:

The problem is there are so many variables it's hard to say. I do believe that no/little dairy and low fat (includes red meat etc.) is helps. I also feel stress and how we deal with stress is also part of the equation… but there are so many other things to consider.

DONE!! goo.gl/IoaN6U • Tattoos 2.7.2012 • Nipples 10.6.2011 • Exchange 6.24.2011 • Chemo 1.18. 2011 • BMX 8.31.2010 Dx 7/13/2010, IDC, 5cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 0/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
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Feb 2, 2011 06:50PM Angelice wrote:

hm mm intresting  i don't have or drink  milk ,. don't like the taste smell  from young age i remember hating it not drinking milk  and i got breast cancer aggressive  at age 44 last year  so is hard one but intresting,,,,,,,,,,,,

Dx 6/13/2010, 5cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 3/18 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2-
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Feb 2, 2011 07:05PM Fearless_One wrote:

I disagree about it being a "rich women's" disease.   Obviously, poor people get cancer, including me.   It's not all about a meat and dairy-laden diet, or vegans would never get it (as Linda McCartney could chime in if she hadn't died of BC).  There could be several factors at work, including stress (Americans are far more stressed and work more hours), chemicals in our food and birth control pills, which I am convinced have played some large part in this - although I am not in the medical field.
lump/chemo/rads/hyster-ooph/mastectomy/implants
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Feb 2, 2011 07:11PM tooyoungtohavebc wrote:

I hate milk...so next theory pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeTongue out
Dx 6/2005, IDC, 6cm+, Stage IV, Grade 3, 1/7 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
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Feb 2, 2011 07:19PM lrr4993 wrote:

I agree with lago.  Less dairy and meat is probably a good idea, but it is not a singular solution.  I do remember reading something somewhere about casein, which is a chemical in cow's milk dairy, has been shown to be a cancer causing agent.  I don't remember how scientific that conclusion was. 

Lisa Dx 8/6/2010, IDC, Stage IB, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2-
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Feb 2, 2011 08:42PM JeninMichigan wrote:

I truly believe it has to do with their consumption of soy from the beginning of life.    Their diets are much different than ours.   Rich in soy and fresh veggies.   The argument in the U.S. goes in  two extreme directions regarding the effect of soy on breast cancer.   I think though it is safe to say if you haven't had a diet consisting of soy from early in life, it could be detrimental to consume soy in large doses all of the sudden..especially not natural soy.  

I agree with Fitz though that cancer is the perfect storm.   So many things comes together and your body is not strong enough to defend itself.

Jennifer

Dx 2/22/2008, IDC, 2cm, Stage IV, Grade 3, 4/9 nodes, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2+
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Feb 2, 2011 08:48PM Fearless_One wrote:

I just don't buy it....too many vegetarians get BC.   It's more than that. 

lump/chemo/rads/hyster-ooph/mastectomy/implants
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Feb 2, 2011 08:52PM - edited Feb 2, 2011 08:54PM by Titan

II don't like milk either...grew up as a dairy farmers daughter..but wouldn't drink it..got cancer anyway.

Enough of what causes this crappy disease..find a cure.

 I do agree though with all the preservatives in our food...those can't be good for us..cancer or not...

We also had bacon, eggs, mashed potatoes, red meat, pork ham..my mom and dad are doing great...age 76 and 78...I got cancer at 49...

Dx 3/18/2009, IDC, 1cm, Stage I, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2-
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Feb 3, 2011 06:56AM MCTHO wrote:

Hi Everyone!  I really enjoyed reading everyone's feedback.  It helps to keep me balance.  Personally, while not ruling out any dairy connection, I believe like many of you, that it must be a combination of things that result in the lower breast cancer rate.  To say it's just dairy or soy is just too easy.  That is my two cents!  Thanks for all the comments, all are valuable!  Smile
Dx 7/2009, IDC, Stage IV, Grade 3, 1/1 nodes, mets, ER-/PR-, HER2+
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Feb 3, 2011 07:15AM riley702 wrote:

"Only one in 10,000 women in China will die from it, compared to that terrible figure of one in 12 in Britain and the even grimmer average of one in 10 across most Western countries."

I don't think the above to be true. I think it's confusing death rates in China with occurrence rates (mistakenly stated as death rates) in Western countries.

Carolyn - Initially diagnosed in 2010 and threw everything at it they would let me throw at it. My 2 sentinel nodes were negative, yet in 2017, it came baaack! in my right lung. Dx 1/26/2010, IDC, 4cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/2 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- Targeted Therapy 2/8/2010 Avastin (bevacizumab) Chemotherapy 2/8/2010 Adriamycin (doxorubicin), Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel), Xeloda (capecitabine) Surgery 9/4/2010 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 10/18/2010 Breast, Lymph nodes Surgery 12/13/2010 Prophylactic mastectomy: Right Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2010 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Hormonal Therapy 9/30/2011 Aromasin (exemestane) Dx 3/2018, IDC, 4cm, Stage IV, metastasized to brain/lungs, Grade 3, 0/2 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2-
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Feb 3, 2011 07:51AM Fearless_One wrote:

My money is on birth control pills, particular long term use.   Putting extra hormones in our bodies for years and then getting an epidemic of BC years later, is no coincidence, IMO.   When you look at when they came out and the climbing rates....but just my opinion, I am not a doctor.

I would like to see studies of women who took BCP's then got BC, why can't I find such studies? 

lump/chemo/rads/hyster-ooph/mastectomy/implants
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Feb 3, 2011 08:10AM lisa34lisa wrote:

Not sure about the Birth Control issue.  I do NOT think they are as safe as once believed.  But, I only took BC for a yr... Max.  BC at age 39.  ??? 

"You don't get to decide how you die. You do, however, get to decide how you live"! Dx 3/5/2010, IDC, <1cm, Stage IV, Grade 3, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
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Feb 3, 2011 08:18AM Fearless_One wrote:

But on average, I would like to see some studies comparing BC rates with women who were on BCP's for over 5 years, vs women who never took them.    I was on them for over 20 years....

lump/chemo/rads/hyster-ooph/mastectomy/implants
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Feb 3, 2011 08:32AM suzieq60 wrote:

I read that Japanese women have a much lower incidence of breast cancer. I was researching the connection between thyroid issues and breast cancer, given that I have a goitre and had bc and so do so many of us on this site. The theory is that Japanese women have more iodine in their diet from seaweed etc. The breasts actually process iodine and compete with the thyroid.

http://breast-cancer-research.com/content/5/5/235

2nd diagnosis October 2010 - IDC 5.8mm node negative - missed on mammogram in October 2009 Dx 10/13/2009, ILC, 1cm, Stage I, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
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Feb 3, 2011 08:34AM Heidihill wrote:

I am living proof that dairy is a potent cancer-fighter, dairy from organic, grass-fed cows, that is, preferrably Simmentaler Fleckvieh with 30% more conjugated linoleic acid. I hardly touched dairy products until my diagnosis. I lived on milk, cheese and yoghurt during chemo and am now "cancer-free/NED" and have stronger bones. Sorry, I don't buy Dr. Plant's idea (nor am I trying to sell any of mine). I wonder if Dr. Plant has observed that Chinese women get around more on their bikes out in the sun, eat smaller portions, drink less alcohol, do more tai chi, have less indoor heating, than women in Western countries?

Dx 8/2007, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 2, 2/19 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Hormonal Therapy 3/25/2015 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Feb 3, 2011 09:27AM lago wrote:

I do believe Birth Control can be a problem but it depends on how long and when you take it. I have read once you stop your risk goes away. I was on birth control pills in my early 20's. I think I stopped around age 22-23. Started at 19 and did have some breaks. I don't attribute my BC to these pills in my case. My older sister also took them in her early twenties too. She doesn't have BC.

DONE!! goo.gl/IoaN6U • Tattoos 2.7.2012 • Nipples 10.6.2011 • Exchange 6.24.2011 • Chemo 1.18. 2011 • BMX 8.31.2010 Dx 7/13/2010, IDC, 5cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 0/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
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Feb 3, 2011 09:35AM barbe1958 wrote:

Heidi, I don't see how eating yoghurt while you're on chemo proves that dairy is a cure. You are NED because of the chemo, not because of the yoghurt. Maybe I mis-understood your wording ....   Your points about the life-style of the Asian women make a lot of sense though!

Interesting about the iodine - I always knew kelp was good, but didn't know for what. I had a thyroidectomy years ago and am not on any additional meds for the loss. I wonder.....

Dx 12/10/2008, IDC: Papillary, Left, 1cm, Stage IB, 2/5 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 12/15/2008 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right Dx 2/4/2016, IDC: Papillary, Left, Stage IV, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 2/10/2016 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 2/16/2016 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Feb 3, 2011 11:44AM pip57 wrote:

How reliable are the statistics reported from China?  I don't trust much info that is released by the Chinese gov't.

 And even if they had a significantly lower bc rate, how can anyone say it must be that they eat more soy?  Their diet is different in many ways.  I suspect it has more to do with what they don't eat, like all the fast food for example?  Perhaps with the change in diet occurring in China these days, the next generation will have more health problems that mirror North America.

PIP - multi focal, FEC100/Tax, rads, dble mast with no recon, ooph/hyst, arimidex Dx 2/1/2007, DCIS/IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIIB, Grade 2, 9/16 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Feb 3, 2011 11:56AM Alpal wrote:

PIP - I'm with you. Remember, this is the same country where until recently it has been socially acceptable to abandon female babies. How available is health care to the masses? How many women just die and no one knows why? Seriously, do we have any idea how many women in China get regular mammograms? I hate to be the nay sayer, but I'm very skeptical. That being said, I feel fairly certain they eat a healthier diet than most of us do.

Allison Dx 7/2008, IDC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Feb 3, 2011 12:21PM lorieg wrote:

"I think that cancer is the perfect storm. Lots of crap going wrong;"

Love this quote.  Mind if I borrow it, Fitz?

Lori, age 33, dx IBC Stage IV 8/09, Grade 3, ER+/PR-/Her2+, married with a 4 year old son and a 1 year old daughter Dx 8/21/2009, IBC, 6cm+, Stage IV, Grade 3, 0/25 nodes, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2+
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Feb 3, 2011 12:32PM Heidihill wrote:

Sorry, Barbe and anyone else confused. I was copying Dr. Plant's reasoning in reverse. I also think it was her chemo that helped her.

You should have your thyroid hormones checked. Hormones could fluctuate over time. You may need to be taking meds which could help with fatigue or aches and pains.

Dx 8/2007, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 2, 2/19 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Hormonal Therapy 3/25/2015 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Feb 3, 2011 12:48PM Fearless_One wrote:

I didn't say that every woman who takes BCP's gets BC, just that it makes sense that it would be a factor.   Billions of dollars a year are spent on reducing estrogen in women, so logic would dictate that a pill that adds estrogen, could play a large role.

lump/chemo/rads/hyster-ooph/mastectomy/implants
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Feb 3, 2011 12:49PM IllinoisNancy wrote:

I have had BC twice and I hate milk.  I think I got my first BC from 19 years of birth control pills and eating beef and drinking beer.  I have always been thin and exercised.  I think my second BC is because I didn't get chemo the first time.  I also received radiation from a little local hospital and I'm not sure they did it right.  I'm hoping this time with chemo and a bilaterial masectomy I leave nothing behind and can get my life back.

Good luck,

Nancy

Pleomorphic Invasive Breast cancer three times 2006, 2010 and 2016, IBrance and Femara, NET Cancer in stomach and liver 2015, Sandostatin

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