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Topic: Did anybody else see this?

Forum: Stage IV/Metastatic Breast Cancer ONLY —

Please respect that this forum is for members with stage IV/metastatic breast cancer only. There is a separate forum for caregivers and friends: Caring for Someone with Stage 4 or Mets.

Metastatic breast cancer (MBC; also called stage IV) is breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, most commonly the bones, liver, brain, or lungs. Metastatic breast cancer can be treated but not cured. Metastatic disease is NOT hopeless. There are a wide variety of treatment options for metastatic breast cancer, and new medicines are being tested every day. More and more people are living life to the fullest while being treated for metastatic breast cancer.

Note: Please contact your doctor for any specific concerns about symptoms you are experiencing or your course of treatment.

Learn more about living with MBC.

Intro medically reviewed by: Brian Wojciechowski, M.D.
Last review date: November 22, 2020

Posted on: Jun 15, 2013 07:02PM - edited Jun 15, 2013 08:18PM by Moderators

sincitydealer wrote:

I just saw an interview with somebody from Duke University on Fox news.  He made it sound like this is the Holy Grail for estrogen positive women who've failed on Tamoxifin and Aromatase Inhibitors.  I sure hope he's right!  This has been approved in Europe and will most likely be approved here.  He said it was right under their noses all along, and it's expected to work well on late stage breast cancer.  This would be the next step after failure of the anti-hormonals instead of going on to chemo.  It completely shuts down the estrogen receptors.  Some of you may qualify for the trial.

Osteoporosis Drug Stops Growth of Breast Cancer Cells, Even in Resistant Tumors

About This Article

Article Details

Published: June 15, 2013
Updated: June 15, 2013

By Duke Medicine News and Communications

DURHAM, N.C. -- A drug approved in Europe to treat osteoporosis has now been shown to stop the growth of breast cancer cells, even in cancers that have become resistant to current targeted therapies, according to a Duke Cancer Institute study.

The findings, presented June 15, 2013, at the annual Endocrine Society meeting in San Francisco, indicate that the drug bazedoxifene packs a powerful one-two punch that not only prevents estrogen from fueling breast cancer cell growth, but also flags the estrogen receptor for destruction.

"We found bazedoxifene binds to the estrogen receptor and interferes with its activity, but the surprising thing we then found was that it also degrades the receptor; it gets rid of it," said senior author Donald McDonnell, PhD, chair of Duke's Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology.

In animal and cell culture studies, the drug inhibited growth both in estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells and in cells that had developed resistance to the anti-estrogen tamoxifen and/or to the aromatase inhibitors, two of the most widely used types of drugs to prevent and treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Currently, if breast cancer cells develop resistance to these therapies, patients are usually treated with toxic chemotherapy agents that have significant side effects.

Bazedoxifene is a pill that, like tamoxifen, belongs to a class of drugs known as specific estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). These drugs are distinguished by their ability to behave like estrogen in some tissues, while significantly blocking estrogen action in other tissues. But unlike tamoxifen, bazedoxifene has some of the properties of a newer group of drugs, known as selective estrogen receptor degraders, or SERDs, which can target the estrogen receptor for destruction.

"Because the drug is removing the estrogen receptor as a target by degradation, it is less likely the cancer cell can develop a resistance mechanism because you are removing the target," said lead author Suzanne Wardell, PhD, a research scientist working in McDonnell's lab.

Many investigators had assumed that once breast cancer cells developed resistance to tamoxifen, they would be resistant to all drugs that target the estrogen receptor, McDonnell explained.

"We discovered that the estrogen receptor is still a good target, even after it resistance to tamoxifen has developed," he said.

The investigators tested a variety of breast cancer cell types, including tamoxifen-sensitive cells that are resistant to the drug lapatinib, another targeted therapy that is used to treat patients with advanced breast cancer whose tumors contain the mutant HER2 gene. These cells had previously been shown to reactivate estrogen signaling in order to acquire drug resistance. In this cell type, bazedoxifene also potently inhibited cell growth.

Paradoxically, in bone tissue, bazedoxifene mimics the action of estrogen, helping protect it from destruction. Because bazedoxifene has already undergone safety and efficacy studies as a treatment for osteoporosis, it may be a viable near-term option for patients with advanced breast cancer whose tumors have become resistant to other treatment options, Wardell reported. In clinical trials, the most often reported side effect was hot flashes in the bazedoxifene treatment groups.

The study was funded by a research grant from Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, maker of bazedoxifene.

In addition to Wardell and McDonnell, Erik Nelson and Christina Chao of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, contributed to the research.

Edited by Mods to tidy up imported formatting

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Jun 21, 2013 09:17AM wardells wrote:

Yamamama (love that name!), the aromasin essentially blocks estrogen receptor signaling throughout the body.  While estrogen receptor activity may be bad for breast cancer, it is important for bone - that is why women get osteoporosis after menopause.  So, the bisphosphonates are to retain your bone density while on aromasin (an aromatase inhibitor that blocks production of estrogens, and would therefore block their activity in bone), and because there is evidence that bisphosphonate treatment may reduce bone met formation/growth.  I am not a prescribing physician (I have to emphasize to all of you that I am a researcher, and there are many aspects of prescribing drugs that I don't have to deal with and may not even be aware of).  It would be up to them to decide whether BZA would be of benefit and whether to keep you on bisphophonates.  I would not think there is a reason not be keep you on those, but there may be one.

Raloxifene and BZA work in bone to mimic estrogen receptor activity.  The actual definition of "SERM" is that the drug works differently to either mimic or oppose estrogen activity in different cells/tissues.  So, all SERMs are actually bone protective, in that they function similarly to estrogen in bone.  BZA is different from tamoxifen in that it blocks estrogen receptor activity in both breast and uterus (tamoxifen stimulates the receptor in uterus), and BZA is different from raloxifene in that it is a much stronger antagonist in breast (so more potential to block estrogen receptor activity) and also does not cause hot flash.

Affinitor works by interfering with what is called the mTOR pathway - this is a metabolic pathway in the cells that normally maintains a set energy set point (homeostasis), and that is hijacked by cancer and turned up to maximum volume through a variety of ways.  Adding that to any therapy just increases the directions from which the meds are attacking the cancer.

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Jun 21, 2013 09:46AM blainejennifer wrote:

So, kids, here is Pfizer's contact information:

Customer Service and Product Inquiries:
1-800-TRY-FIRST (1-800-879-3477)
Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. EST

Corporate Office:
1-212-733-2323
235 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017

The name of the drug is bazedoxifene. Let the calls and letters flow like wine.

ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade 3. Stage 4, July 2012. Currently on Gemzar/Carboplatin Dx 5/2006, IDC, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 4/12 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 3/2012, IDC, Stage IV, 4/12 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 6/27/2012 Taxol (paclitaxel) Hormonal Therapy 6/4/2013 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Chemotherapy 7/1/2014 Xeloda (capecitabine) Hormonal Therapy 8/14/2015 Femara (letrozole) Chemotherapy 1/31/2016 Halaven (eribulin) Chemotherapy 8/31/2016 CMF Chemotherapy 11/1/2016 Halaven (eribulin) Chemotherapy Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Gemzar (gemcitabine)
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Jun 21, 2013 04:15PM sincitydealer wrote:

Excellent information, Wardells.  Thank you!Laughing

Peggy

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Jun 21, 2013 05:26PM steelrose wrote:

Wardells,
I am following your posts with great interest, and am grateful for your input... welcome! It's so valuable to us all to have someone posting who is on the front line of research. Thank you, thank you!

And thanks again, Peggy, for your continued concern for everyone here. Great people y'all are!

Rose.

Dx 1/22/2010, IDC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jun 21, 2013 05:44PM YamaMama wrote:

Thank you Wardells for being so generous with your posts! I very much realize this might not be a treatment that would work for me.  But, knowing there are people who are dedicated to research, and that there continue to be meds to keep me alive give me hope. I love Hope!

Dx 5/1/2009, IDC, Stage IV, Grade 3, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jun 21, 2013 07:26PM sincitydealer wrote:

You're welcome, Rose.  I'm just glad I still have something useful to contribute.  I might not post very much anymore, but I do keep up with the wonderful friends I've made here.  And it sure is great to have a knowledgeable researcher contributing, also.

Peggy

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Jun 21, 2013 08:53PM Moiralf wrote:

I've been following this thread since the beginning too and can I please add my thanks to Wardell for their input. It is so helpful to have the research explained in such clear and easy to understand language. Plus, you make no attempt to push any agenda and just explain how it all fits together without bias.

Please can you continue to add whatever you believe may be helpful. It is truly appreciated by those of us that wonder what it all means.



Moira

Moiralf Dx 11/16/2007, IDC, 3cm, Stage IV, 9/13 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jun 22, 2013 01:33AM Skream wrote:

I echo the thanks to both Peggy and Wardells. Thanks too to blainejen for posting Pfizer's info. I will be calling. As a Er/ pr+ lady, I am thrilled the research is continuing and that more possibilities for targeted treatments are out there! Clearly we need the clinical trials to see if there is in Vivo benefit. Keep us updated, please, Wardells!

      “Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark.” Dx 1/9/2012, IDC, 6cm+, Stage IV, Grade 2, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jun 22, 2013 11:33AM kayrnic wrote:

Yamamama.......just to clarify, Xgeva is not a biosphosphanate, it is a monocal antibody. While it is prescribed with the same intent as the biosphosphonates (zometa, aredia) it works a bit differently. I don't know how important this distinction is and/or why one would be prescibed over another.....but just a bit of info. I have picked up along this journey. I am on pamidronate (aredia) and asked about xgeva because a shot sounded better than an infusion. My onc said he doesn't use xgeva because it is quite expensive in comparison to the biosphosphonates.

Kay ---bone mets Dx 11/14/2001, IDC, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, 0/9 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 3/9/2012, IDC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jun 22, 2013 01:44PM YamaMama wrote:

Kayrnic...I was on Zometa for a little over 2 years, and then went on to the xgeva for (almost 2 years now). It's not clear how long I will be on the xgeva. My doctors definitely see a distinction and feel the xgeva is better for my mets for now. I am aware of the distinction between the two classes of drugs, but I appreciate your taking time to post the difference :)

Dx 5/1/2009, IDC, Stage IV, Grade 3, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jun 22, 2013 02:36PM bikergal wrote:

Dr. Wardell,

Thank you very much for your valuable contributions to this thread!

Are there clinical researchers in Europe interested in doing a clinical trial to evaluate BZA's efficacy in treating advanced breast cancer in humans?  If they have independent financing, I wouldn't think they would require Pfizer's approval since the drug already is on the market.  Do you know anything about this? 

Is Pfizer interested in pursuing clinical trials for the drug's use in breast cancer treatment?  It seems like such a promising drug, I would hate to see it abandoned in the US.  If not, I wonder if it would be willing to license its rights to the drug to another company or entity willing to work on its development as a cancer drug.  Any thoughts on this?     

Are you able to tell us why Pfizer did not want to sell the drug for the treatment of osteoporosis in the US?  Have the relevant patents expired?

Thanks for your posts and for the research you have done and are doing to find treatments for us.

Best,

BG



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Jun 23, 2013 12:06AM 1Athena1 wrote:

So here is a question and forgive me if it is a silly one: would this drug be a good choice to try if TAM is too slow or doesn't work?  My onc is concerned that TAM isn't working quickly and/or enough and wants to try Xeloda. Fine wih me, but that is the reason for the question.

Peggy, so nice to hear from you.

Anyone diagnosed with cancer should learn to have a healthy disrespect for statistics. Statistics are maths. It's the science which still eludes us. Dx 3/2009, IDC, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 3/8 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jun 23, 2013 09:23AM wardells wrote:

Bikergal, what a lot of great questions.

BZA has actually only been out in Europe for a couple of years, and it has not generated quite as much interest so far as Pfizer had hoped.  So, it would be easier to generate interest in testing in breast cancer if it were a common drug that was suddenly found to be effective in treating a different illness.  The press release was picked up by the European press, and we will see whether that generates interest.  Unfortunately, it takes a lot of $ and time to martial forces to start a trial.  In the states, we would have to form an investigator group of interested clinicians, and then gain Internal Review Board (IRB) approval by the IRB of each institution participating (usually we try to get several sites).  They might be able to do a trial in Europe if they have enough funding to cover the drug (and the doctors' and nurses' time, and the medical records' time, etc - clinical trials get into the millions of $ all too quickly).  That would be made some what easier if the European equivalent of the HMO covers the drug (I don't know that).  I am not aware of any such trials on going, but certainly am keeping my ear to the ground.  If any oncs in Europe do decide to try out BZA (probably on a breast cancer patient who also has osteoporosis, if I had to guess), but would at least generate anecdotal data. 

You are probably close to correct on the patent issue as to why Pfizer is not registering BZA in the States for osteoporosis treatment.  Raloxifene goes off patent in March 2014, and the only clinical indication (reason to give the drug) currently approved for BZA is treatment of osteoporosis.  Raloxifene is approved for that same reason and also for breast cancer prevention (which BZA might also be great for, but Pfizer doesn't have sufficient clinical data to ask the FDA to approve that indication).  One of the challenges in drug development is that an improved drug that treats the same condition as an older drug is often at a disadvantage.  In this case, it won't matter to the HMO/drug plan that BZA has less side effects - they will only see $/pill.  I have to emphasize that this is actually just my own game of connect the dots using available info when I wondered the same thing (Pfizer has never said as much), but I would guess that Pfizer recognized a losing battle.

Pfizer has never yet reported any trials to evaluate BZA in breast cancer.  I am not privy to their thought process, so I can't say that they have no interest.  However, again, from their perspective, to get a drug approved for breast cancer, the company has to show superiority or at least "non-inferiority" (meaning that it works just as well), in a large randomized trial (and that comes with lots of $ signs attached).  And then the company has to work hard to get the drug recognized and used in the arena.  That is one reason that it would be hard to get another SERM approved as an initial therapy for breast cancer.  For a majority of women, Tam works well as a first therapy, although it certainly has it's limitations and tumors are prone to relapse and progress.  To get another drug approved (say BZA for sake of argument only), Pfizer would have to show BZA worked equally well and then also compete in the market, and since Tam is generic, that is a losing battle.  Likewise, faslodex is approved for advanced breast cancer, and it is generic.  They would have to do a head to head comparison trial with BZA and faslodex (or examestane, or something like that) in order to gain approval.  In this case, BZA has the advantage over faslodex in that it is administered orally (which makes a distinction between the drugs for the sake of getting approval), but the aromatase inhibitors are also oral.  I'm not saying that Pfizer is unlikely to ever consider it, but they have to consider it from so many directions that they may have to chew on it for a while.  The study that we reported (and the media/patient interest it has generated) may encourage that.  But they are unlikely to license it to another company to pursue that - companies hate to lose control of their drugs.

In the mean time, the drug may possibly be obtained through compassionate use from Pfizer.  It can't hurt to work with your Dr to request it, but I again have to remind you that I am not your Dr and that every woman is different - only you and your Dr know your particular history.  1Athena1, BZA might be a good option, if you are able to get it - what you have noted in your history fits the profile of a patient who would likely benefit from BZA.   If it were me, I would ask my Dr to give it a try. But it depends on WHY your tumor(s) aren't responding well (and the answer may be in Ki67 readout, etc).  the Drs do know a lot, and they have more info on your history than I, so don't discount what they say! 

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Jun 23, 2013 09:47AM sincitydealer wrote:

It's great to know that BZA is at least available even if you can't get it specifically for breast cancer.  Ladies, please get this information to your oncs!  Wardells is right!  You never know who might benefit from this!

Wardells, thank you so much for answering all these questions!  This board has long needed a member with the knowledge you have to share.

Thank you once again, ladies, for being glad to hear from me and welcoming my input.Laughing

Peggy 

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Jun 23, 2013 12:51PM Capriness wrote:

Wardells said, "clinical trials get into the millions of $ all too quickly"

Sounds like it's time for Komen to pony up some dough for us Stage IV people, huh?

Teri

Teri Dx 7/23/1996, DCIS, 2cm, Stage IIB, 4/9 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 8/15/1996 Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Right, Underarm/Axillary Chemotherapy 9/15/1996 AC Hormonal Therapy 11/26/1996 Surgery 2/15/1997 Mastectomy: Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Left Surgery 5/15/1997 Reconstruction (left): Free TRAM flap, Nipple reconstruction; Reconstruction (right): Free TRAM flap, Nipple reconstruction Surgery 9/15/2005 Lymph node removal: Right, Underarm/Axillary Radiation Therapy 2/1/2006 Breast, Lymph nodes Chemotherapy 4/15/2006 Fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil), Taxotere (docetaxel) Hormonal Therapy 6/15/2006 Arimidex (anastrozole) Hormonal Therapy 6/15/2006 Aromasin (exemestane) Hormonal Therapy 8/15/2006 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy 9/15/2006 Hormonal Therapy 7/15/2009 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Dx 8/15/2009, DCIS, 6cm+, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 1/15/2013 Aromasin (exemestane) Targeted Therapy 2/7/2013 Afinitor (everolimus)
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Jun 24, 2013 01:34AM bikergal wrote:

Hi Dr. Wardell,

Thanks so much for your response. 

At the moment (knock wood), I am doing well on the treatments I am on.  So, I would be reluctant to switch to an unproven drug.  That said, if BZA actually works in tumors that are resistant to tamoxifen, Faslodex, and aromatase inhibitors, it would be a great drug to have in one's arsenal.  But I would like to see it actually tested for treatment of advanced cancer before trying it, if I have other tested options.

As someone who currently is on Faslodex, as well as Herceptin and Xgeva, I think having an oral drug instead of one that must be taken via injection would be a huge improvement, and no hot flashes would be the icing on the cake.  If this drug were as effective as Faslodex, I think it would be quite popular.  It also could be tested as second or third line therapy, after an aromatase inhibitor and Tamoxifen or Faslodex.  Have you tried talking with those doing translational research in breast cancer at Duke?  Maybe your colleague,  Dr. McDonnell, who seems to work with those doing clinical trials in breast cancer could promote the possiblity of doing trials on this drug.  Surely it would be a great achievement for Duke, if it not only could claim credit for all of your work, but also for clinical trials confirming your results. 

If Duke is not interested, maybe those of us who are treated at academic institutions could try to drum up interest.  I certainly will ask my onc after she returns from vacation. It would be a real shame if such a promising drug is not tested for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, particular since testing has already established its safety.

Thanks again,



BG

   



 McDonnell

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Jun 24, 2013 02:55PM wardells wrote:

It would be great to organize a clinical trial, I have not yet really explored whether that could be done without Pfizer on board at least to some degree, because the drug is not approved or available in the US except directly from them.  But it would definitely be something to approach our clinical colleagues about.  And definitely, do bring up with your onc.  The more awareness the better.  Even if it isn't the right treatment for you, it might be for the next patient on their schedule!  This would definitely be an option to consider for patients who already have low bone density and are facing aromatase inhibitor treatment.

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Jun 25, 2013 04:11PM MaryLW wrote:

I talked to my onc about BZA, and he hadn't heard of it, but looked it up. He was pretty impressed with what he read, and felt hopeful that it would be approved in the US before too long. He thought it might be a good treatment for me at some point!

Mary - mets to hip, femur, ilium, and peritoneum Dx 12/1996, ILC, 2cm, Stage II, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 1/16/1997 Lymph node removal: Right, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right Chemotherapy 2/6/1997 CMF Surgery 8/14/1997 Reconstruction (right) Dx 3/2008, ILC, ER+/PR-, HER2- Surgery 3/17/2008 Lumpectomy: Right Chemotherapy 5/15/2008 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Hormonal Therapy 7/31/2008 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 8/31/2008 Breast, Lymph nodes Dx 1/14/2013, Stage IV, ER+/PR-, HER2- Radiation Therapy 2/13/2013 Bone Hormonal Therapy 3/4/2013 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy 10/21/2013 Aromasin (exemestane) Targeted Therapy 10/23/2013 Afinitor (everolimus)
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Jul 6, 2013 08:33AM Southerngirl wrote:

I thank you so much for your input and for all your hard work and commitment to help us Wardells! You are a rockstar, right up there with Dr. Dennis Slamon! I am crying I am so happy to read this thread. I cannot tell you how wonderful it is to feel the hope it brings!

SouthernGirl Dx 3/18/2006, IDC, Stage IV, Grade 2, 3/24 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+
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Jul 16, 2013 04:18PM olisad wrote:

Hi all. Has anyone asked their doc about compassionate use of BZA? Interested in the responses. Thanks. Lisa

Best friend has mets to liver, bone, brain.
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Jul 16, 2013 05:27PM BaseballFan wrote:

Maybe this is a really dumb question.....but.....would this treatment be helpful for all mets or just those in bones?

Bobbi Dx 3/14/2009, 6cm+, Stage IV, 11/14 nodes, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2- Surgery 7/23/2009 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel Surgery 10/1/2009 Lumpectomy: Right Chemotherapy 9/1/2010 Xeloda (capecitabine) Chemotherapy 2/13/2012 Xeloda (capecitabine) Chemotherapy 12/12/2012 Taxol (paclitaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/26/2013 Afinitor (everolimus) Chemotherapy 10/1/2013 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Gemzar (gemcitabine)
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Jul 16, 2013 05:33PM wardells wrote:

BZA should be effective in treating primary tumors and mets so long as they are outside the brain.  The drug does not cross the blood-brain barrier well.  We are working on some drugs of this same class that will, so as to hopefully target brain mets as well, but those are a ways off yet.

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Jul 16, 2013 08:25PM YamaMama wrote:

I talked to my onc last week about this drug. He had not heard about it yet, but he looked up the article I referenced, and a few others while I was there in his office with him.  He was very pleased about it.  Tamoxifen got me to NED after my diagnosis, and kept me there for almost 2 years.  So, trying another SERM may be a great option for me. 

I'm very hopeful this drug will be approved soon.

Dx 5/1/2009, IDC, Stage IV, Grade 3, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jul 16, 2013 08:38PM BaseballFan wrote:

Thanks Dr. Wardells. I just emailed the info to my onc nurse in preparation for my appt. next week. Please continue to update us.

Bobbi Dx 3/14/2009, 6cm+, Stage IV, 11/14 nodes, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2- Surgery 7/23/2009 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel Surgery 10/1/2009 Lumpectomy: Right Chemotherapy 9/1/2010 Xeloda (capecitabine) Chemotherapy 2/13/2012 Xeloda (capecitabine) Chemotherapy 12/12/2012 Taxol (paclitaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/26/2013 Afinitor (everolimus) Chemotherapy 10/1/2013 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Gemzar (gemcitabine)
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Jul 16, 2013 10:30PM ShelMel wrote:

Wow! Such great info! I'll share this with my onc next time I see him. This is exciting news! Thank you so much for sharing so much info and taking the time to answer these questions.

::::Life, Love, Hope, LIVE :::: mets to lungs, chest wall, sternum, liver, spleen, L5 spine Surgery 9/26/2010 Lumpectomy: Right Dx 9/27/2010, IDC, 1cm, Stage I, Grade 2, 0/5 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy 12/1/2010 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Radiation Therapy 3/9/2011 Breast Hormonal Therapy 4/30/2011 Surgery 8/23/2012 Prophylactic ovary removal Dx 10/30/2012, IDC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 12/17/2012 Arimidex (anastrozole) Chemotherapy 1/3/2013 Adriamycin (doxorubicin), Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil) Chemotherapy 5/14/2013 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxol (paclitaxel) Chemotherapy 7/15/2013 Halaven (eribulin)
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Jul 17, 2013 09:37AM wardells wrote:

I only wish I had more than just information to offer!  I admire the courage that each of you take into each morning.  Dr. McDonnell and I are continuing to encourage Pfizer to pursue this angle, and Pfizer is also feeling the weight of the many emails/contacts that they have received.  Soldier on!

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Jul 17, 2013 09:51AM steelrose wrote:

I will talk to my oncologist next week about this drug. I am on year 3 of Arimidex, currently NED and holding down the fort, but of course waiting for the next attack. Soldier on, indeed! Thank you for your continuing input, wardells...

Dx 1/22/2010, IDC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jul 17, 2013 10:26AM blainejennifer wrote:

Just did my weekly call to Pfizer, and the medical information nurse was very unaware of the drug (Barbara, if you happen to call and get her. She's really nice.).

So, keep calling. Every call gets logged into a database, and if there are enough calls and letters, we are bound to get some attention for bazedoxifene.

Customer Service and Product Inquiries: 1-800-TRY-FIRST (1-800-879-3477) Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. EST


Corporate Office: 1-212-733-2323 235 East 42nd Street New York, NY 10017

I'm now off to write my weekly letter to send to corporate. Join me?

Jennifer

ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade 3. Stage 4, July 2012. Currently on Gemzar/Carboplatin Dx 5/2006, IDC, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 4/12 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 3/2012, IDC, Stage IV, 4/12 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 6/27/2012 Taxol (paclitaxel) Hormonal Therapy 6/4/2013 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Chemotherapy 7/1/2014 Xeloda (capecitabine) Hormonal Therapy 8/14/2015 Femara (letrozole) Chemotherapy 1/31/2016 Halaven (eribulin) Chemotherapy 8/31/2016 CMF Chemotherapy 11/1/2016 Halaven (eribulin) Chemotherapy Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Gemzar (gemcitabine)
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Jul 17, 2013 10:45AM steelrose wrote:

I will call! Thanks, Jennifer.

Dx 1/22/2010, IDC, Stage IV, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Jul 17, 2013 10:49AM blainejennifer wrote:

The Weekly Letter:

Pfizer

235 East 42nd Street

New York, NY 10017

Dear Pfizer Folk,

I am writing to ask that your drug, Bazedoxifene, be entered into clinical trials alone, as it appears to be a fine Selective Estrogen Receptor Degrader, and it would be very useful in the treatment of hormone receptor positive Breast Cancer.

As a Stage 4 Breast Cancer patient, I am very keen to get this drug, and others like it, into our pharmaceutical arsenal.

I know you are planning to market it, along with conjugated estrogens, as an Osteoporosis treatment, but we in the Breast Cancer community, would like a crack at it without the estrogens, for obvious reasons.

As a marketing ploy, if you could say that one of the ingredients in Viviant actually prevented Breast Cancer, it might calm the fears of any lady worried about the estrogens in the product. And, you could prove its efficacy by pointing to its effect on Breast Cancer in our population, Stage 4. And we would be glad to help you out by merrily ingesting the drug and providing data.

At this time, I would also like to thank the pharmaceutical industry for researching and providing all the amazing drugs that are helping me, and others like me, treat our disease. I know you guys get a bum rap sometimes, but I believe that you are entitled to a fair profit for what you do, and I am super glad that you are doing it. Please keep beavering away.

ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade 3. Stage 4, July 2012. Currently on Gemzar/Carboplatin Dx 5/2006, IDC, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 4/12 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 3/2012, IDC, Stage IV, 4/12 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 6/27/2012 Taxol (paclitaxel) Hormonal Therapy 6/4/2013 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Chemotherapy 7/1/2014 Xeloda (capecitabine) Hormonal Therapy 8/14/2015 Femara (letrozole) Chemotherapy 1/31/2016 Halaven (eribulin) Chemotherapy 8/31/2016 CMF Chemotherapy 11/1/2016 Halaven (eribulin) Chemotherapy Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Gemzar (gemcitabine)

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