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Topic: I say YES..Part Deux..Continued,.for the StrangeDeadRockerGroup

Forum: Growing Our Friendships After Treatment —

For those who have met on Breastcancer.org and want to continue growing their cybersibling friendships beyond cancer.

Posted on: Jul 31, 2014 09:27AM

bluedahlia wrote:

Here we go.............

But some people without brains do an awful lot of talking... don't they? - Scarecrow, Wizard of Oz.
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Jun 19, 2017 11:19AM Trill1943 wrote:

Come on Supreme Court--do the right thing!


Supreme Court to hear potentially landmark case on partisan gerrymandering

By Robert Barnes June 19 at 11:02 AM

The Supreme Court declared Monday that it will consider whether gerrymandered election maps favoring one political party over another violate the Constitution, a potentially fundamental change in the way American elections are conducted.

The justices regularly are called to invalidate state electoral maps that have been illegally drawn to reduce the influence of racial minorities by depressing the impact of their votes.

[Supreme Court says Virginia redistricting must be reexamined for racial bias]

But the Supreme Court has never found a plan unconstitutional because of partisan gerrymandering. If it does, it would have a revolutionary impact on the reapportionment that comes after the 2020 election and could come at the expense of Republicans, who control the process in the majority of states.

The court accepted a case from Wisconsin, where a divided panel of three federal judges last year ruled last year that the state's Republican leadership in 2011 pushed through a plan so partisan that it violated the Constitution's First Amendment and equal rights protections.

Dx 10/31/2015, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/14/2015 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right
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Jun 19, 2017 12:57PM - edited Jun 19, 2017 01:05PM by SelenaWolf

A good article... and for the record, I am happily married and adore men; I enjoy "traditional" pastimes, such as cooking, knitting and gardening; and I love looking feminine in dresses and heels. I am, also, pro-choice (because what happens in someone else's uterus is none of my business) and support religious diversity and social justice. But the very fact that I feel the need to qualify this tells me that contemporary feminism is still very relevant. Who I am and what I like to do (or wear) should not have a bearing on whether- or not I believe in the betterment of society by addressing systemic gender inequality.

http://everydayfeminism.com/2016/12/anti-feminist-...


4 Reasons Anti-Feminist Women Hate Feminism (And What They're Missing)

December 5, 2016 by Ginny Brown

I don't need female empowerment, because I'm not weak!"

"I'm not a feminist because I don't hate men."

"I don't need feminism. I actually like cooking for my husband."

I used to agree with a lot of statements like this. I thought feminists were only doing harm to themselves and others, and I proudly proclaimed that I was not a feminist.

What changed my mind was learning that a lot of what I thought feminists believed was false – including the idea that gender oppression only affects women. Some of it was just myth, things that anti-feminists said feminists believed. Some of it was taking the words of one or two feminists and assuming they spoke for the whole.

Nobody can speak for all of feminism, including me – and I especially can't speak for how a/gender minorities besides cis women experience feminism. But I did learn over time, through getting to know more people who identified as feminists, that the things I thought were basic and fundamental to feminism were exaggerations, or belonged only to some more fringe groups.

One of the biggest misconceptions about feminism is that it's a movement for women, by women, and made up of women in opposition of men. In truth, not only should feminism should benefit everyone, as it works to dismantle all systems of oppression, but it shouldn't be based on this binary gender thinking in the first place. Not only men and women exist, and they're not opposites in a binary.

But a lot of the ways in which anti-feminists conceptualize feminism is based on this untruth about women versus men. And in order to address those specific misconceptions, I'm going to speak from that place. Non-binary people may recognize themselves in these experiences as well, but those experiences (especially insofar as erasure is concerned) are unique, and I'm not qualified to speak on them.

I'm not here to say that all women should call themselves feminist. There are good reasons not to, including the ways feminism has failed to be intersectional and meet the needs of people of color, trans and gender non-confirming people, and others.

But if you are anti-feminist and agree with some of the quotes that I started this article with, I'd ask you to read on and consider that the truth about feminism might be more complicated.

1. 'Feminists Are Just Playing the Victim'

"Sure, sexism used to be a problem. But now women have reached equality: We can vote, we have the same access to jobs and education as men, we're allowed to dress how we want, and are considered equal partners in relationships. Western feminists are just whining, nit-picking, and enjoying feeling victimized instead of appreciating the freedoms we have."

There's a lot of truth in this argument: Women have come a long way, baby.

As a woman, I'd rather live here and now than almost any other point in history. And I'm not denying the struggles that many girls and women around the world face, or claiming that mine are equal to theirs.

But it's not true to say that sexism is dead. We may have slain the giant dragon of institutional sexism, which insisted that women fill an inferior role in the world, but there is still a hornet's nest of sexist culture that lives on.

And while I'd rather be stung by a dozen hornets than be eaten by a dragon, that doesn't mean that I don't have a right to complain about the stings.

When I'm in a professional meeting with men, I often have to fight to get my voice heard – and if I talk as much or as confidently as the men do, I may get labeled "bossy" or "shrill." When I leave the house, strangers feel free to comment on my body, which makes me feel unsafe and exposed. Men I meet tend to evaluate me first as a sexual object, and only second (or never) as a competent or interesting human.

These things make a difference.

They don't make it impossible for me to have a good job, to go about my day, and to have the kinds of relationships I want, but they do make it harder. Any one thing by itself would be no big deal, but in time they add up.

Just like you can brush off one hornet sting, but if you got stung every day, multiple times a day, all over your body, you might start to get really, really bothered by it.

Now, when I talk about the ways sexism hurts me, I'm not whining or making things up. I don't think of myself as a victim, and I don't actually enjoy complaining. I'm also not saying I'm not glad I have the freedom to vote, to apply for any job I want, and to be viewed as a full legal human.

I'm just saying that I'm still hurt by sexism, and that I want the world to be better for myself and other women.

2. 'Feminism Says Women Are Weak'

"Women may have a few obstacles that men don't, but feminism actually insults women by acting like they're not able to overcome those obstacles. It encourages women to be sensitive and thin-skinned instead of being tough and going after their goals. Women don't need feminism. We're strong enough to succeed on our own."

It's true that some women are capable of overcoming every obstacle that sexism puts in their way. We have women heading up corporations, pioneering scientific discoveries, and this past election, a woman came incredibly close to being elected the next president of the United States.

Powerful, successful women like Oprah Winfrey, Sally Ride, and Melinda Gates prove that women can do anything men can, even with the added burden of institutional sexism.

But the strength of these women, while I admire and celebrate it, shows off a part of the problem.

Women can achieve just about every success men can, but they have to be stronger, tougher, and usually more qualified than their male counterparts. They need to be thick-skinned enough to shrug off harassment. They need to walk a fine line of being assertive without being judged "bossy" or "bitchy."

Among CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, for the last several years, between 20 and 25 have been women – around 4-4.5%. Those 20+ women are impressive, and their achievement shouldn't be underrated, but that percentage is discouraging.

Less than 5% of Fortune 500 CEOs are women: If that doesn't show that sexism is still making it harder for women to reach the top of their field, what does it show? I simply don't believe that men are, on average, 19 times better at corporate leadership skills than women.

Similarly, many women in scientific fields have talked about the barriers that keep them from advancing, and often that keep them from staying in the field at all.

Sexual harassment is a huge problem in the academic world, and causes many women to leave promising careers because they can't handle the dehumanization, and because their work is taken less seriously than their sexual potential. Many women stay in STEM fields anyway, and achieve great things, but many other women, just as capable, have to leave.

Feminism doesn't say that women are weak: It just says that, to succeed in any given field, women shouldn't have to be so much stronger than the men they're working with.

3. 'Feminists Hate Men'

"Feminists treat men like they're the enemy: They say all men are rapists and misogynists, just trying to keep women down. Feminists aren't content with gender equality. They want to put women in power and oppress men, just like women used to be oppressed."

I admit that I often feel frustrated with "men" in the abstract these days. Having been harassed, belittled, and taken advantage of by so many men, I am a little wary when meeting a man I don't know.

However, there are also a lot of men I love, respect, and trust.I don't hate "men," as such – I hate toxic masculinity.

Toxic masculinity is the set of rules and expectations we have for male behavior – including how men are supposed to treat and think about women. Toxic masculinity is what tells men it's not okay to cry, and it is okay to catcall women. Toxic masculinity is what tells a man that his worth is in gaining power over others, and that it is shameful to have a woman beat him at anything.

Toxic masculinity hurts men.

Men are pressured to be high achievers and always competing with each other, which creates stress. The expectation that they will always appear powerful and in control makes it hard for men to ask for help. They're shamed and ridiculed for stepping outside the bounds of "acceptable" masculine behavior.

All of this makes it harder for men to get through the world.

Feminists don't want to destroy or oppress men: They want to destroy toxic masculinity, to let people of all genders see how damaging it is to all of us.

4. 'Feminism Means Rejecting Traditional Gender Roles'

"Feminism is for women who want careers, who don't like makeup and shopping, who want to be the boss in their relationships. Women who like being homemakers, being traditionally feminine, and having their partners take the lead don't need feminism – and feminism often looks down on those women."

It's true that feminist movements tend to be headed by people who don't feel the status quo suits them. It's also true that some feminists look down on conventional ways of being feminine – and that's a problem.

There's a thing we call "femmephobia," which is the attitude that anything traditionally associated with women is inferior.

It's the reason keeping up a home and taking care of children isn't viewed as a "real job." It's the reason books, movies, and music that tend to be enjoyed more by women are seen as fluff.

People all over the gender and political spectrums can fall into femmephobia. Sometimes feminists do a good job of questioning why "girl stuff" is considered less valuable and worthwhile, and sometimes we fall into the trap of looking down on it.

What's important to me, as a feminist, is not steering clear of traditional femininity. It's getting rid of the assumption that women should be feminine and men should be masculine.

There are definitely some people that do fit very comfortably into the roles their culture put them in, and that's great for them! Obviously, there are also plenty of people who don't.

Housekeeping and childrearing are skills just like any other, and some people – of any gender – find that work interesting and rewarding (I'm one of them!).

I want to see a world where those skills are considered valuable for anyone who wants to pursue them. I also want to see a world where makeup, fashion, and beauty are respected as the arts they are.

Even submissive or "follower" relationship roles, which might seem at first glance to be obviously an inferior position, aren't necessarily so. Many people feel happiest and most comfortable playing first mate to someone else's captain, and doing that well is a relationship skill all its own.

I'd like to see a world where people are free to find the balance of leader/follower dynamics that work best for them, whatever their gender.

Feminism isn't about flipping the script of gender roles, where women are powerful and in charge and men are submissive. Feminism is about increasing the freedom we all have to find the roles that fit us best.

***

Changing my view of what feminism meant was a little scary for me – it was comforting to tell myself that women had achieved equality, and that any issues I might experience with sexism were just isolated, one-off events.

Eventually it became clear to me that that just wasn't true. All the little moments of sexism I experienced were connected, and other women faced more intense and constant discrimination that came from the same source.

We still had a steeper hill to climb than men – and while I didn't want to believe that at first, in the end, I found it a source of strength.

I don't like or agree with every feminist, but I find strength in the fact that we have experienced some of the same struggles, and are still working and succeeding. When I get tired and frustrated, there's a whole community of other feminists to support and encourage me.

Most importantly, I find strength in knowing we're committed to making the world a better, easier place for each other and the women that come after us.


"... good girls never made history ..."
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Jun 19, 2017 02:40PM ChiSandy wrote:

Anyone who still doesn’t believe that sexism is dead needs to know:

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) was repeatedly admonished by the committee chair (McCain, IIRC) to “let the witness answer the question” when in fact the witness was interrupting her question and not letting her finish. No male Senators were so admonished.

The woman contestant eliminated last night on “Next Food Network Star” (albeit justifiably because of her inarticulateness and mediocre cooking) was, in two consecutive team challenges two weeks in a row, shouted down & sabotaged by the rest of her (all-male) teammates—in the “asides” she complained of “not having a voice.” She was never given the choice of what task to do, what to cook, etc. Last week, in a time-limited video-presentation challenge, one of her teammates took two full minutes to do his presentation, leaving her with only 30 seconds. Last night, she was so pressured by her male teammates that she flubbed take after take; the team leader told her to stop so that the remaining chefs could tape their presentations; and by the time they got back to her she was so flustered that she couldn’t adequately describe the baklava she made—and in fact, forgot to brush the phyllo dough layers with butter before baking. Maybe her inarticulateness was innate (she didn’t seem to be the brightest bulb in the chandelier), but much of it was due to having been the only woman on two teams and actively or passively bullied by her teammates.

And a quick surf over to the “men with breast cancer” threads will reveal that male bc patients are also victims of gender-stereotyping. How many “awareness” spots and presentations (even during “Pinktober”) stress that men need to do breast self-exams too, at least as regularly as checking the rest of their anatomy for lumps?

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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Jun 19, 2017 03:04PM ChiSandy wrote:

London police are not giving the arrestee’s name, but say he is 47, Welsh, white and heavily tattooed. It is being officially classified anti-Muslim “terrorism,” as “hate crime” is too mild. Meanwhile, a suicide-car-bomb attack against a police van in Paris was unsuccessful…except for the suicide.

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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Jun 19, 2017 03:10PM april485 wrote:

Argh Sandy...I DVR'd FNS to watch later...but I knew she would be next one eliminated based on what she has gone through so far so no big deal. They walked all over her last week and she was too timid to break in and say what she wanted in the group. It is done on all levels.

Feminism is part of who I am and who I have been since I first heard the term waaaaay back. Gender inequality makes me absolutely nuts. Ever since I was a little girl and saw the "help wanted male" and "help wanted female" want ads in the newspaper, I have been questioning why men considered themselves superior to women. I am still angry that men still earn more per hour for the same work.

When I was a waitress, I consistently earned high tips but the one lone waiter on staff on Saturday nights with me would consistently make more in tips than all of us. I would hear the customers say things to him like "Good luck in college young man" as they handed him 10 dollar bills instead of the 5 dollar bills that same table would give female staff. I was not there for 'mascara money' for pete's sake. I had kids at home and needed the income. I finally went to college when my kids were older but it still stings.

When I bought my daughter a little used car when she went away to college, I bought her a bumper sticker. It said "Eve was framed" and at first she thought it was an eyeroll type of thing. But, she took a feminist theory class and realized what women have gone through JUST so she could go to college. Suffice to say, she changed her mind and slapped that sticker on that little old Ford Escort...HA!

"Fear has been a huge dictator in my life - so I am trying to stage a coup!" ~ a friend Dx 1/30/2013, DCIS, <1cm, Stage 0, Grade 2, ER+/PR+ Surgery 2/20/2013 Lumpectomy: Left Surgery 3/10/2013 Lumpectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 4/21/2013 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 6/19/2013 Aromasin (exemestane) Hormonal Therapy 1/1/2016 Femara (letrozole)
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Jun 19, 2017 03:36PM ChiSandy wrote:

My mom was so bright she graduated from high school at barely sixteen. But because her brother had to go to college & law school (and her much older sister was already married and on her own), she wasn’t allowed to take the “academic” track but instead was forced to sign up for the “commercial” (clerical, sales, “voc. trades”) track. Her skills were so sharp she was immediately hired by a Wall St. law firm, where she stayed till I was born 13 years later. She wanted to be a lawyer, and her boss urged her to apply to “read law” under his tutelage and eventually sit for the NYS bar exam. But she also had been trying to conceive for the past 3 years, so… When she returned to work, she started at the NYC Bd. of Ed. as a Grade 1 clerk-typist; she retired in her early 60s as a caseworker supervisor (outranking social workers with MSWs) with the city’s Dept. of Social Services. She took and aced every civil service exam she could, losing out only to male WWII and Korea veterans whose “bonus points” boosted them higher on the lists. And even when she was a housewife, she joined and became president of every organization she joined—from neighborhood councils, civilian-police relations, community boards, and all three PTAs (grade, JHS, HS).

From as far back as I can remember, even when she was a housewife till she started back to work full-time when I was 14, she would admonish me not to let anyone tell me I couldn’t do something because I was a girl. (Klutz, yeah. Girl, no).

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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Jun 19, 2017 03:50PM april485 wrote:

Obviously, you took her advice since I know darn well how few women went to law school back when you did. Good for you Sandy! You obviously inherited your Mom's smarts and drive.

"Fear has been a huge dictator in my life - so I am trying to stage a coup!" ~ a friend Dx 1/30/2013, DCIS, <1cm, Stage 0, Grade 2, ER+/PR+ Surgery 2/20/2013 Lumpectomy: Left Surgery 3/10/2013 Lumpectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 4/21/2013 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 6/19/2013 Aromasin (exemestane) Hormonal Therapy 1/1/2016 Femara (letrozole)
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Jun 19, 2017 07:14PM - edited Jun 19, 2017 07:15PM by IllinoisLady

Loved all the entries I read today. Went and had my mammo and Dexa this afternoon. Since it has been a bit quiet this afternoon I thought I'd find something that made me smile and share it:


Image may contain: text

Each day I am thankful for nights that turned into mornings, friends that turned into family, dreams that turned into reality and likes that turned into love. ~~~Elizabeth Kuebler-Ross Dx 9/27/2007, IDC, 5cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Jun 19, 2017 08:31PM IllinoisLady wrote:

I read this piece this morning before getting ready to go to mammo and dexa. I've not ever much doubted that Trump doesn't really like being Pres. as I've not been convinced from the first day that he actually thought he would win. Seems to me he would rather take pot shots at others rather then the reverse. I guess I'm more thinking of Pence ( since he lawyered up ) who seems to be trying to edge somewhat quietly so far into the Oval Office chair behind the desk. I hope that doesn't work.


News & Politics

Trump Reportedly Hates Being President, but 'Doesn't Want to Go Down in History' for Resigning Adviser says he feels "strained" by life in D.C. and the job's long hours.

By Hunter / DailyKos

June 19, 2017, 6:40 AM GMT

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Photo Credit: Albert H. Teich / Shutterstock

Buried in an alarming-all-by-itself Politico article pondering how far down the line of succession we'd have to get, in the Justice Department, before we found someone who would not either have to recuse themselves from the Russia-Trump investigation or who an enraged Trump wouldn't also summarily fire—oh, and by the way Trump might simply change the executive order setting the Justice Department's line of succession, thus speeding up the process of, say, eventually just giving that job to Jared Kushner as well:

"At the rate we're going, [more firings are] clearly possible, because you could go through a number of people in one go depending on the things that are asked of them," said Jane Chong, a national security and law associate at the Hoover Institution. "If Rosenstein had refused to write the memo [laying out the case for Comey's firing], you can imagine him being fired, and you can imagine Brand doing the same thing. It's not difficult to see a scenario like that" playing out down the line, Chong said.

... is this little nugget of a quote.

Trump, too, is cognizant of the comparison to Nixon, according to one adviser. The president, who friends said does not enjoy living in Washington and is strained by the demanding hours of the job, is motivated to carry on because he "doesn't want to go down in history as a guy who tried and failed," said the adviser. "He doesn't want to be the second president in history to resign."

We've heard for a while that Trump doesn't like the job and is feeling "strained" by it even after spending nearly every last sodding Friday-to-Sunday at Mar-a-Lago or, now that the season's closed, hitting up one of his other golf courses—spending more time and taxpayer money on his own leisure than any president in recent history. He's furious at the way he's been treated in the press, and by opponents, and has been yelling at televisions and at his own staff for not making him magically successful and popular.

But he's tired and cranky to the extent that, according to an "adviser," the thought of resigning has already been on his mind? Do tell.

We're only five months in, you know. That's it. The man is "strained" by the job and the town and the lack of gold-painted ceilings after only five sodding months in and, according to one of his own advisers, is hanging on after these first twentyish weeks not because he gives a flying damn about any of it but because he's afraid quitting would make him look like a failure.

Holy moly is he, the rest of his White House, and just by-the-by every last one of the rest of us in big trouble. Meanwhile, Vice President Mike Pence is trying to skirt the Russia-Trump-Flynn-Comey-takeyourpick investigation while measuring the Oval Office drapes himself, likely under the assumption that he'll be getting to redecorate sooner rather than later.

Michael Lazzaro, aka Hunter, is a Daily Kos Contributing Editor.

Each day I am thankful for nights that turned into mornings, friends that turned into family, dreams that turned into reality and likes that turned into love. ~~~Elizabeth Kuebler-Ross Dx 9/27/2007, IDC, 5cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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Jun 19, 2017 08:53PM ChiSandy wrote:

Trump hasn’t commented on the London white-supremacist terror attack on a London mosque last night. Gee, I wonder why? (Off to Urgent Care to have tongue surgically removed from cheek).

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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Jun 19, 2017 09:13PM CeliaC wrote:

Very interesting posts over the last few pages about Shakespeare, the arts/humanities and feminism. Fortunately, spent all four years in high school in Honors English and never had to suffer students that were not engaged in learning. Not saying I loved all we studied (recollect one teacher who loved Moby Dick & other Melville and Steinbeck novels that I reluctantly read). I also credit a lifelong interest in Art to a wonderful art teacher from 7th grade. Interesting that Shakespeare never loses relevance, even in today's world. I am forever thankful to my dear departed Dad for his encouragement & suggesting I pursue a degree in Accounting. Was one of only 3 female Accounting majors in my 1976 grad class. Happy to say DH and I we raised DD to be a devotee of the humanities and feminist. She has even begun using "gender neutral" pronouns. Apologies for rambling on a bit. Enjoying everyone's postings, even though I am not often moved to comment.

Dx 12/2/2016, DCIS/IDC, Left, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/1 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 12/20/2016 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy 2/20/2017 Whole-breast: Breast Hormonal Therapy 4/4/2017 Arimidex (anastrozole)
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Jun 19, 2017 10:45PM Trill1943 wrote:

Such good reading today! Thanks all for the postings....I need to re-read the longer pieces.

I don't know if I'm a feminist or not and never have.

But people--including many women--hardly realize that when we talk so passionately about discrimination toward blacks, Muslims, Jews, the disabled, the LGBT community, etc and get riled up about it, as we should, we leave out the BIGGEST group that's discriminated against: WOMEN.

Notice how it's kept well down and almost out of sight, emerging with a Kamala Harris (I love her...I love her calm, her questioning. I would hate to be her enemy!), or an Elizabeth Warren.

Or a Hillary Clinton.

It's like these bed bugs I'm fighting: hidden, sneaky, subtle, cunning, but

BITING LIKE HELL AND LEAVING BIG FAT ITCHY WELTS THAT LAST AND LAST!

We are blinded to it.

Like the air we breathe, we aren't aware of its pervasiveness.

Like the crafty bed bugs that before they push their proboscis (or whatever it is) into you, they inject a numbing agent so you don't feel the bite. Then they also inject an anticoagulant that keeps the blood liquid while they feast.

We don't feel the discrimination most of the time. We're numb to it.

We do our jobs and our efforts flow into and nourish this country in one way or another.

But we're paid less for it than your average guy with the same job. . . .

And that's just one thing.

It's so funny--to see the outcry over these attacks on minorities and not realize that for every one of them hundreds (or more) women are silently, stealthily, subtly being treated no better.

Dx 10/31/2015, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/14/2015 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right
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Jun 19, 2017 10:54PM Trill1943 wrote:

Sandy, you and your mom: peas in a pod.

She sounds delightful. How fortunate you were!

I recall my mother saying to me when the subject of romance, boys, etc came up:

"Marriage isn't everything."

She said it with a straight face, cutting a slice of cheese or pulling off the pack another slice of bologna, as her husband and five kids waited for her to make lunch.

She loved being married, adored her husband and he, her, but she gave me the right to NOT marry if I didn't want to. If I wanted to do other things. And I loved that about her.

She would say, when I was struggling with my painting or writing: "Just do it. Don't worry about it. Don't finesse it. Dive in and make a mess if you want to."

She gave me the right to fail.

Dx 10/31/2015, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/14/2015 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right
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Jun 19, 2017 11:23PM SerenitySTAT wrote:

My 78-yr-old mother was a physician. It never occurred to me that I couldn't do anything I wanted. When I was in 7th grade, I read a study stating that boys were better than girls at math starting in 7th grade. I was so stubborn that I decided to prove them wrong. I ended up getting a MS in mathematics. I did have a well-rounded education and valued my humanities and art courses. Like Celia, my 7th grade art teacher instilled a love of art. I even took a calligraphy course, and it's bizarre to think someone can't read cursive.

I'm a feminist. I don't like to wear much makeup or wear heals. I'm not a good cook. I'm good at math. But I am happily married (though I kept my last name). I love to bake. I chose to stay home with my young children. I took them to art and science museums. I took them on walks after the rain to jump in puddles. My daughters are avid readers and creative writers. They know that Shakespeare is long dead.

"Do not overlook the little joys!" (Hesse, 1905) 🐶☕️🛀🖼🥐🌲🎭 Dx 11/2015 IDC Left IIIC 10/11 nodes ER+PR+HER2-, 12/2015 Left Mast, 2/2016 4 AC+12 Taxol, 9/2016 Rads Nodes Chest wall 15+4 boosts, 10/2016 Tamox
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Jun 19, 2017 11:35PM Trill1943 wrote:

And while we're on the subject...

(Right on, Jordan!)


'I know what Paul Ryan stands for': Eighth-grader defends refusal to pose with House speaker

By Samantha Schmidt June 6

It was a small act of defiance: Dozens of eighth-grade students from South Orange Middle School in New Jersey declining to pose for photographs with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) during a trip to Washington.

But by opting out of the photo session in front of the Capitol last month, the students made national headlines. Many commended them for standing their ground and politely asserting their political viewpoints.

Others denounced the students' behavior, saying they disrespected Ryan by refusing to do something as simple as appear in a photo with him. Several people commenting on news stories and social media posts called the students "disgraceful" while others argued they were "indoctrinated" by their parents.

Some used stronger words, taking to Ryan's Instagram post to call the students "losers" and "sniveling little brats." (Ryan had posted a picture on Instagram giving a fist-bump to one of the students who appeared in the photo).

"It's a shame our country is coming to this," one person commented on the Instagram post. "8th graders can't even respect our elected officials."

Another individual wrote: "Few of these kids are actively engaged enough to name one piece of legislation they have specific disagreements with and instead parrot their parents' and teachers' talking points."

"How did those 8th graders get so brainwashed to understand the politics of today and decide who is villain," said another. "I suggest this is the work of the teachers … useful idiots that they are."

Many of the students fired back on social media, defending themselves and making clear to the critics they are more than capable of forming their own ideas.

One eighth-grade girl, Jordan McCray-Robinson, went as far as reaching out to her local suburb's news website, the Village Green. She asked whether it would publish a story interviewing the students to "show that they were well-informed," Village Green co-founder Mary Barr Mann told The Washington Post.

"We suggested that it would be more powerful if she wrote it," Mann said.

So Jordan did just that. In her detailed opinion article published Monday in the Village Green, Jordan addressed those who criticized her and her fellow classmates for opting out of the photo.

"I am here to tell the nation that although we're only in the 8th grade, we have our own thoughts and opinions," Jordan wrote. "My teachers did not influence my decision not to take a picture with Mr. Ryan. I decided I didn't want to take a picture with someone who doesn't have my best interests in mind. Mr. Ryan and the administration want to cut health care for 23 million people. Am I one of those U.S. citizens that will be affected?"

Jordan wrote that she chose not to take the photo because "I wasn't going to be used as a publicity stunt."

As the criticism poured in on Instagram, Jordan stood up for her classmates, writing in the comments that "even though we're 13-14 year olds we decided by ourselves" to step out of the picture.

"I know what Paul Ryan stands for and I'm not going to take a picture with him," Jordan said. "Kids know a lot and you should stop being close minded and see that too."

And in her opinion article, she went beyond simply explaining her reasoning. Jordan cited interviews she conducted with a teacher, who weighed in on the criticism, saying, "In my classroom alone, I have seen students provide different, conflicting opinions when it comes to debates and discussions." She included testimonies from a member of the "LGBTQ+ community," as well as an African American male student who chose to pose with Ryan, "not necessarily because of his views but because of the power of his job."

"Students couldn't escape criticism on the Internet whether they decided to take the picture or not," Jordan wrote, adding that many people "mistakenly assumed that everyone in the picture supported Paul Ryan and the administration."

Jordan said she thought it was "ridiculous," "rude" and "ignorant" for an adult to tell 14-year-old students they should not express an opinion because they have not experienced "the real world."

"Excuse me?! If I'm not in the 'real world,' where am I?" Jordan wrote. "I have the same right to express myself as everyone else in this country. Why shouldn't I be able to show how I feel about what the current administration has been doing?"

She said she refuses to support a politician who stands behind a president who "wants to ban Muslims from the country because they worship differently."

"I respect views and opinions that differ from mine and I expect the same when it comes to my opinion," Jordan wrote, closing her piece. "I will not tolerate my peers and I being shamed for voicing our opinions. My generation is the future. I will be working and living in a society created by today's decisions. So why shouldn't I be able to speak my truth?"

Dx 10/31/2015, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/14/2015 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right
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Jun 19, 2017 11:36PM SerenitySTAT wrote:

"Russia has a future."

The New Face of Russian Resistance

Masha Gessen

The new face of Russian protest is barely pubescent. Reports from the June 12 demonstrations, which brought hundreds and sometimes thousands of people into the streets of just about every Russian city, feature teenagers: a boy in shorts being tackled by police in riot gear, a girl charging a police line, and a paddy wagon full of adolescents. One Russian Facebook user posted a photograph of the teenagers in the paddy wagon with the caption, "Russia has a future." He posited that "every mass arrest of young people strengthens youth protest," which, in turn, is sure to bring about the end of the regime.

There is a feverish tone to Russian blog posts in the aftermath of Monday's protests, a sense of hope struggling to defy fear. Without a doubt, Monday's protests—often in open defiance of Russian authorities, who in many cities refused to give permits to hold them—were the most geographically widespread in all of Russian history: eight people, including five minors, were detained in the sleepy southern resort town of Yeysk (population 88,000), and nine people were detained five thousand miles across the country, in Blagoveshchensk, on the border with China. In all, more than 1,700 people were thrown in jail—nearly half of them in Moscow—the single largest wave of arrests in many decades. In Moscow, some of the detainees had to spend the night on benches in a police courtyard because there was no room for them inside the precinct. On the other hand, this means that enough people took to the streets on Monday to make that many arrests possible. Most of the detainees were released within hours; many were sentenced to fines and between five and thirty days behind bars; a few will certainly face several years in a prison colony. This is how post-totalitarian terror works—by punishing a randomly chosen few to frighten the many. What is giving some Russians hope is that a new generation of people who are not yet frightened seems to have burst onto the scene.

To appreciate the "Russia has a future" Facebook post, however, you need to know who wrote it and when. The author is sixty-nine-year-old political scientist Georgy Satarov. In a past life, he was a mathematician, but in 1990, he quit math to study politics. On June 12 of that year Russia declared itself a sovereign state. No one knew what this meant: Russia was the largest and most powerful constituent republic of the USSR and the seat of imperial power, so it was unclear how it could secede from the empire. But exactly one year later, on June 12, 1991, Russians elected Boris Yeltsin, a Communist Party functionary gone rogue, to be their president. A couple of months after that, the Soviet Union collapsed, Russia became, indeed, a sovereign state, and June 12 became its new national holiday. Satarov, meanwhile, became one of Yeltsin's closest advisers.

There were months, perhaps even a couple of years, of great optimism. The wisdom to which Satarov, among others, subscribed was that people shaped by the Soviet regime—those conditioned to live in fear—would fade away and a new nation would be born, brave and democratic. By the mid-1990s, however, that vision had faded. Democracy turned out to be messy, Yeltsin resorted to violence against a rebellious parliament and then a rebellious region—Chechnya—and Soviet nostalgia was beginning to creep in. Yeltsin formed a commission to come up with a new national idea: something less mobilizing than an ideology but still sufficient to create a sense of unity and purpose. He put Satarov in charge of it. The commission toiled for months but never produced a national idea.

Then along came Vladimir Putin, with the idea of making Russia great again. He quickly dismantled all of Russia's democratic accomplishments, taking over the media, canceling most elections and fixing the rest, and reversing judicial reform. He also dethroned the oligarchs and installed his own clan, instituting the regime of a mafia state. After a dozen years of this, a critical number of Russians seemed to grow fed up with the daily experience of corruption and the routine mockery of the remaining rituals of democracy. In December 2011, following rigged parliamentary elections, the country erupted in protest. Hundreds of thousands came out in nearly a hundred cities across the country. People of all ages and socioeconomic classes took part in the demonstrations, but the public face of those protests were white-collar workers in their twenties. Perhaps they were the generation Russia had been waiting for.

In response, the government cracked down. As soon as Putin was inaugurated for his third term as president, he introduced a series of bills aimed at raising the risks of protest: now anyone, including a casual participant, could face charges in connection with a protest the authorities deemed to be illegal—and the penalties could be harsh. The bills were pushed through in advance of June 12, 2012, when protesters planned to come out again. Arrests began a few days before the scheduled protest. Thousands of people still braved the streets, but the wave of popular resistance was effectively stemmed.

Over the past five years, several dozen rank-and-file protest participants across the country have received sentences of three or four years in prison colonies. People have also gone to jail for writing blog posts deemed "extremist," or even "sharing" and "liking" such posts. The government has cracked down on NGOs, accusing them of being "foreign agents." All but a couple of tiny independent media outlets have been forced to shut down. And the organizers and leaders of the 2011-2012 protests are either in exile (like former chess champion Garry Kasparov), in jail (like radical organizer Sergei Udaltsov), or dead (like politician Boris Nemtsov).

The one exception is Alexei Navalny, a forty-one-year-old lawyer who has turned a blog about government corruption into a popular movement. Like other visible anti-Putin activists, Navalny has been pressured to leave the country and has repeatedly been brought to trial on trumped-up charges. In 2013 a court sentenced him to four and a half years in a prison colony for supposed fraud, and thousands of people took to the streets in Moscow; Navalny was released the next day, his sentence suspended. The state has jailed his brother, Oleg Navalny—taking him hostage—but Alexei Navalny has continued to investigate powerful Russians.

This is what ignited the recent protests. On March 2, Navalny released his most recent and explosive report, exposing in damning detail prime minister Dmitry Medvedev's expansive estates and extravagant sneaker collection. The video version of the report has now been viewed more than 22 million times. In late March, Navalny was able to bring thousands of people into the streets in anti-corruption protests. And then he called for even larger protests on the June 12 anniversary.

Navalny has been attacked physically for his activism. Last month, he lost most of the vision in one eye after an assailant threw acid in his face. This occurred soon after Navalny announced an audacious plan to challenge Putin in the 2018 presidential election.

Still, Navalny seems to have found the key both to staying alive and out of prison and to getting people into the streets. Indeed, it is his ability to mobilize protesters that has kept him out of prison: the regime fears mass protest. Navalny's single-minded focus on corruption allows him to avoid more controversial issues such as the war in Ukraine, and to appeal to a maximum number of Russians directly: corruption affects everyone, all the time. It was Navalny who called for the protests on June 12. In Moscow, he got a boost from the city administration, which is pursuing a giant urban-renewal project that will cost tens of thousands of Muscovites their homes. This, too, is corruption: Muscovites are convinced that the mayor and his circle will personally benefit from turning city lands over to developers.

The people who came out this week still represent only a tiny fraction of the population; in the absence of independent media and with civil society in shambles, they are unlikely to turn themselves into a durable political movement. Many of those who joined the protests five years ago are no longer in the streets. Some of them have surely been scared away by the threat of arrest. Others have simply given up. Still others are conformists who will always join a crowd—it's just that the giant crowds five years ago, when as many as 100,000 people took to the streets in Moscow at once, were crowds of protesters. Finally, some of those who protested in 2011-2012 are coming out again. But they too see very young people as representing the current wave of resistance. Or perhaps they are simply placing their hopes in the teenagers because they no longer trust themselves to create change.

They know what the teenagers are only beginning to learn: in Putin's Russia, protest leads to crackdown. The Kremlin will likely institute even tougher laws against protests, and law enforcement will sweep up dozens or hundreds more ordinary people to send a message to millions. Nor is protest a potential instrument of change in a country that has no politicians or political parties, judiciary, or media that act independently of the Kremlin. But as long as some Russians, including some very young ones, are willing to brave streets filled with riot police, they keep an unreasonable hope alive, and they increase the chances that Alexei Navalny will survive and stay out of prison. That's not nothing.

http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2017/06/14/the-new-fa...

"Do not overlook the little joys!" (Hesse, 1905) 🐶☕️🛀🖼🥐🌲🎭 Dx 11/2015 IDC Left IIIC 10/11 nodes ER+PR+HER2-, 12/2015 Left Mast, 2/2016 4 AC+12 Taxol, 9/2016 Rads Nodes Chest wall 15+4 boosts, 10/2016 Tamox
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Jun 20, 2017 12:44AM Trill1943 wrote:

Serenity, great article! Hooray for these protesters!

Dx 10/31/2015, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/14/2015 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right
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Jun 20, 2017 01:28AM Trill1943 wrote:

It's so hard to fathom that slavery was in full force here for 250 YEARS. That's a long, long time.

And after?

They put out ads looking for loved ones.....



  • Dx 10/31/2015, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Surgery 12/14/2015 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right
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    Jun 20, 2017 09:26AM DivineMrsM wrote:

    I am upset about the Otto Warmbier story.

    Generally I can stay a bit detached from national/global headlines but it is such a tragedy. I am heartbroken for him, his parents and loved ones.

    found lump 12/22/10~er+/pr+/her2- stage iv bone mets~chemo~lumpectomy~ radiation~arimidex~
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    Jun 20, 2017 09:37AM exbrnxgrl wrote:

    I'm with you on that, divine. I literally felt sick when I heard of his passing

    Bilateral mx 9/7/11 with one step ns reconstruction. As of 11/21/11, 2cm met to upper left femur Dx 7/8/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/7/2011 Lymph node removal: Left; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left); Reconstruction (right) Dx 11/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Stage IV, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 11/21/2011 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 11/21/2011 Bone Hormonal Therapy 6/19/2014 Femara (letrozole)
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    Jun 20, 2017 10:31AM SelenaWolf wrote:

    It's becoming so, that I am beginning to avoid the news. The terror attacks in London and Paris, the mosque attack in London, the 17-year-old Muslim girl killed in Virginia, the shootings in Kansas and Montreal earlier this year, and now that poor boy. Where does it end? I don't think I have been this concerned- and scared for the world since the height of the Cold War.

    "... good girls never made history ..."
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    Jun 20, 2017 10:59AM IllinoisLady wrote:

    That's what we're here for:to make the world new.We know what to do:seek justice, love mercy, walk humbly, treat every person as if he or she were yourself.These are not complicated instructions.It's much harder to decipher the instructions for putting together a tricycle than it is to understand these. - Nancy Mairs

    Each day I am thankful for nights that turned into mornings, friends that turned into family, dreams that turned into reality and likes that turned into love. ~~~Elizabeth Kuebler-Ross Dx 9/27/2007, IDC, 5cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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    Jun 20, 2017 11:05AM IllinoisLady wrote:

    I thought about that quote for a bit before I put it in. After reading entries --- just wow !!! People are trying but there is so much evil, injustice, and negativity in this world. Seems like an extremely difficult battle that often has an air bout it that it may be impossible. We really all do know what to do. I do hope that the 'light' stays on. Also hope the turn-around when it comes is highly visible.

    Each day I am thankful for nights that turned into mornings, friends that turned into family, dreams that turned into reality and likes that turned into love. ~~~Elizabeth Kuebler-Ross Dx 9/27/2007, IDC, 5cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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    Jun 20, 2017 12:52PM IllinoisLady wrote:

    Oh my. I had been wondering about his as Mr. Clarke never sounded to me like someone who would turn down a position in Washington.


    You can't fire me, I quit! Sheriff tries to save face after Dept. of Homeland Security rejection By Jen Hayden

    Monday Jun 19, 2017 · 2:00 PM CDT

    2017/06/19 · 14:00

    81 Comments (81 New) Share this article 78

    78

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    70 CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke delivers a speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)David Clarke, soon-to-be formerly known as the sheriff of Milwaukee County

    70 CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke delivers a speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)David Clarke, soon-to-be formerly known as the sheriff of Milwaukee County

    By now you've probably heard of Sheriff David A. Clarke, currently of the sheriff of Milwaukee County. He's a big Trump backer and generally a right-wing nut job known for getting booked on cable news shows to attack the Black Lives Matter movement.

    A Milwaukee man saw Clarke on a flight, the sheriff was decked out in all Dallas Cowboys gear on the very day they were playing the local Green Bay Packers in the playoffs. Dan Black shook his head at Clarke as he walked down the aisle toward his seat and when the landed, he was questioned by police on Clarke's orders!

    But when he got off the plane, Black said, he was met by a group of six uniformed deputies and two dogs, all of whom were accompanied by the sheriff. Black said he was then escorted to the waiting area and questioned by two of the deputies, who said Clarke had told them that Black had made "some remarks" to the sheriff on the plane.

    And last but certainly not least, there have been several disturbing deaths at his Milwaukee County jail, including a detainee who was denied water for seven days and a female inmate who died giving birth on the jail cell floor, while shackled.

    Last month, Sheriff Clarke announced he was leaving Milwaukee because he'd accepted a position as an Assistant Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, something the agency would not confirm.

    Only days later, evidence emerged that Clarke plagiarized portions of his master's thesis on homeland security. The Department of Homeland Security announced Clarke was no longer a candidate for any role at DHS. That didn't stop Clarke's adviser from issuing a statement that is akin to "you can't fire me, I quit!"

    Craig Peterson, a political adviser to Clarke, said in a statement that the sheriff notified DHS Secretary John Kelly late Friday that he "had rescinded his acceptance of the agency's offer" to join the department. The Washington Post first reported on Clarke's decision.

    I reject you rejecting me and reject you first! Either way, this is a win for the people of Milwaukee and a win for the Department of Homeland Security, who avoided this train wreck of a sheriff before he embarrasses an important law enforcement agency our puts people in harm's way.

    Each day I am thankful for nights that turned into mornings, friends that turned into family, dreams that turned into reality and likes that turned into love. ~~~Elizabeth Kuebler-Ross Dx 9/27/2007, IDC, 5cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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    Jun 20, 2017 04:24PM SelenaWolf wrote:

    Oh, good gawd.

    "... good girls never made history ..."
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    Jun 20, 2017 10:27PM IllinoisLady wrote:

    Good to see someone stand up for what is right and speak the truth.


    6 Members of Trump's HIV/AIDS Council Resign

    Posted: 20 Jun 2017 04:33 AM PDT

    The Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS is a body responsible for providing recommendations and information to the president, as well as overseeing the nation's strategy for combating the illness. On Friday, six members of the council resigned, writing in an op-ed published in Newsweek that they can no longer be effective under a "president who simply does not care." The letter was written by Scott Schoettes, who was joined by five other members: Lucy Bradley-Springer, Gina Brown, Ulysses Burley III, Michelle Ogle and Grissel Granados. In the letter, he explains President Donald Trump's administration hasn't taken steps to formulate a strategy for combating the illness, "and -- most concerning -- pushes legislation that will harm people living with HIV and halt or reverse important gains made in the fight against this disease
    Each day I am thankful for nights that turned into mornings, friends that turned into family, dreams that turned into reality and likes that turned into love. ~~~Elizabeth Kuebler-Ross Dx 9/27/2007, IDC, 5cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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    Jun 21, 2017 03:07AM - edited Jun 21, 2017 03:11AM by ChiSandy

    I hope ex-Sheriff Clarke has a nice sinecure as Paul Blart, Mall Cop. (If any mall would have him).

    Bummed out about the GA-6 result tonight (SC I expected, but nobody expected it to be so close. Maybe if the Dems had diverted some $ to that race…). I deliberately skipped cardio at the gym tonight so I wouldn't look at the video monitors on the machines. Got home and had a strangely sinking feeling when I saw the Cubs win handily. You see, “when logic & proportion have fallen sloppy dead" (to quote Grace Slick), I resort not to doing pills or mushrooms or chasing rabbits, but to magical thinking--and not always pleasantly. When the Cubs were in the World Series, I made a bargain with God (or the fates) that if I had to choose between two victories, I'd have chosen Hillary. So when the Cubs won it all, I had a premonition Hillary would be in trouble. So when they won tonight, I didn't even bother turning on MSNBC until 10 pm—I knew in my gut that Ossof had lost.

    What's even more disgusting is how Handel won: lying, lying, lying. First, by shackling Ossof to (the horror!) Nancy Pelosi (you'd think she was the Antichrist); then by showing a video of him at a costume party in college dressed as Han Solo (jeez, he wasn't even 21 and he didn't even drink or cuss in it); but most despicably, running an ad starting with gunshots and then tying him to the shootings of Scalise et al at baseball practice (saying Ossof caused the rhetoric that prodded the shooter to action). Of course, none of the pundits mentioned the latter tonight—they all blathered about how he was the wrong candidate at the wrong time, that he was too young, too inexperienced, too liberal, too wealthy or not progressive enough, that the DNC spent so much money that voters got turned off, that it was a reliably GOP seat anyway (Price had won reelection by 20%, even though DT carried it by only 1%) and that we're dead in the water for 2018. “Nobody loves you when you're down & out" (sorry I keep quoting song lyrics).

    Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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    Jun 21, 2017 10:03AM IllinoisLady wrote:

    Do not pray for easy lives. Pray to be stronger people!
    Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers.
    Pray for power equal to your tasks.

    Phillips Brooks



    SandyThumbsUp

    Each day I am thankful for nights that turned into mornings, friends that turned into family, dreams that turned into reality and likes that turned into love. ~~~Elizabeth Kuebler-Ross Dx 9/27/2007, IDC, 5cm, Stage II, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2-
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    Jun 21, 2017 10:53AM - edited Jun 21, 2017 10:56AM by SelenaWolf

    " ... and then tying him to the shootings of Scalise et al at baseball practice ..."

    I feared when this happened that the Republicans would use it as a rallying cry and milk it for all its worth. I keep an eye on a couple of conservative websites just to keep aware of what the talking points are and just to keep track of the pulse of the right-wing and, after the shooting, the rhetoric was pretty vitriolic and blamed "Democrat hatred and loathing" for the entire incident. Despite the fact the you, me and the sittingroom sofa are fully aware that the shooter was just a bit unhinged, DT's base see him as a perfect example of what every liberal-Democrat really wants to do to every conservative-Republican and would do given half the chance and a little opportunity.

    Things like the anti-DT protests that (unfortunately) turned to violence, the student riots in California against conservative speakers, Kathy Gifford's rather tasteless "joke", and James Hodgkinson have played into Republican fears and conspiracy theories, and - if anything - will further solidify the Republican base. Even if there are Republicans that are not keen on DT, their loyalty to party and their reluctance to admit to the world that DT is a disaster will see them continue to support DT.

    I grow more- and more convinced that impeachment is out-of-the-question and a pipe-dream. The more liberals push for impeachment, the more conservatives will push-back "just because". The only way DT will leave office is either voluntarily or because he does something so heinous that it will be conservatives that will remove him. And, I predict, he'll probably be back for a second term of office simply because conservatives are hellbent on a "so there ha ha" moment. It's kinda like they realize that DT is an incompetent idiot, but he's THEIR idiot and THEY will decide when they've have enough. No one else.

    "... good girls never made history ..."
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    Jun 21, 2017 11:34AM Rockym wrote:

    I am caring for my 85 year old mother with Alzheimer's and stroke complications. The community she lives in insists that she gets loud and ticked off too often. I have barely seen her behave that way. She is sweet and just happy to see me and have someone to talk to. In turn I have had to add medications to her regime (against my better judgement) and now I am told she needs increased care because she takes more meds. Of course this isn't my point. My point is that she is on Medicare with social security income that amounts to chump change per month. My parents were very conservative financially and set up for some monthly income for life through a charitable trust. Even the income she gets from those two combined doesn't cover her expenses.

    I can barely sleep these days knowing that all of her savings will be used for this continuing care. I cannot imagine how those without this type of cash can live with medical conditions. Our society makes advances in medicine to extend life, but then has no plan for where and how these people will live. Anyway, I have no confidence in trump or the repubs. to help those less fortunate then my mother.

    I see a wave coming and it makes me sick. I used to argue with my tweets, then I joked with my tweets, then I simply used profanity in my tweets. Now, I barely tweet because I don't like the anger I feel when I read some of these people's comments. I find myself just wanting to name call and it all feels so immature. This isn't a good feeling.

    Just when I'm about to make ends meet, someone moves the ends. Dx 6/13/2011, IDC, 1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 1, 2/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-

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