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Topic: In Favor of Feminism: Share Your Views

Forum: Bonded by Breast Cancer —

For those who have met on Breastcancer.org and want to continue growing their cybersibling friendships beyond cancer.

Posted on: Jul 14, 2021 01:13AM - edited Jul 14, 2021 07:48PM by DivineMrsM

DivineMrsM wrote:

I'm starting this thread for those of us who support feminism and its beliefs, so we can exchange thoughts, ideas, inspiration, frustrations, personal stories, news stories, famous people stories, memes, book & video recommendations and other matters pertaining to women's equality.

Here's a general definition of feminism: the belief in full social, economic, and political equality and opportunities for all genders. It's about respecting diverse women's experiences, identities, knowledge and strengths, and striving to empower all women to realise their full rights.

[[****Edited to add: The above description is taken from several websites and aligns with my personal view of what feminism means to me. You may have other thoughts. What does feminism mean to you? Please feel free to discuss.]]

Only in the last ten years or so have my eyes been open to the patriarchal world we live in. Since then, I'm continually aware of the many women (including from this forum and also myself) who've been conditioned (by society, religion, family tradition, etc.) to prioritize others before themselves; to take on a "less than" persona, to minimize themselves and their contributions. As women, we need to recognize our value individually and collectively, advocate for ourselves and treat ourselves with the same care and loving-kindness with which we treat others.

Please honor the spirit of the thread. It's not for opposing views. The intention is for those of us with similar views on feminism to have a space to gather, share insights and find support. I feel I will have a lot to contribute. Will you join me?


found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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Jan 4, 2022 11:58PM magiclight wrote:

Janet, I read that piece somewhere, but appreciate your post. I'm going to be more aware of its use in news stories.

Surgery 4/26/2015 Mastectomy: Left, Right Dx IDC, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1 Surgery
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Jan 8, 2022 01:48AM - edited Jan 8, 2022 01:49AM by DivineMrsM

Janet, I agree, the passive tone used is infuriating! If it should ever come up that way in conversation, I will say something like, “It's mind boggling to think there are so many men who are rapists."

The media is often labeled as liberal, but it seems to do its best to keep women in their place and reinforce social conditioning. Most media is run by entitled white men who continue with the good old boys network even as the torch gets passed to younger generations. They frame the world as they see it or as they want it to be seen. They may appear concerned by cover stories like rape but yet will do it in that passive way. It's a double edged sword.


found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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Jan 8, 2022 01:51AM - edited Jan 8, 2022 01:53AM by DivineMrsM

One thing I learned in this article is there's a difference between being nice and being kind. Very insightful.

Women Are Taught To Be Nice. Here's What Happened When I Stopped.
"I wasn't in touch with myself or my needs and, in fact, I felt guilty for having any."


01/07/202

By Alena Papayanis


A few years ago, if we were out together and I noticed that you had something stuck in your teeth, that little speck would spark a huge dilemma for me. I'd stare at it while considering the discomfort it would cause both of us if I told you, yet also imagine your horror at discovering it after a full day of flashing what you thought was a perfect smile.

Despite this awareness, I'd likely avoid our discomfort and let that little speck remain ― I'd choose the "nice" option.

The kind thing to do, though, would be to tell you, despite the brief moment of embarrassment it would cause you and, vicariously, me. Niceness is dishonest and avoids confrontation, whereas kindness is honest but often uncomfortable.

This scenario exemplifies what I've learned about the difference between being nice and being kind. I've spent the majority of my life being nice — a people pleaser — avoiding confrontation and the discomfort I'd feel from making those around me uncomfortable.

My moment of greatest shame around this was over a decade ago when I essentially broke up with a boyfriend of two years over text because I couldn't handle having an uncomfortable conversation with him, not that day or any day of our relationship, which would have been the kind thing to do.

I even convinced myself that this was the nice option, allowing him to receive the bad news privately without me there to witness his reaction. But in truth, I was hiding from his discomfort, and thus my own.

Avoiding his discomfort made me not only cruel but also a coward. But confrontation, outside of political or philosophical topics, was scary to me. In romantic relationships, it felt like a deep threat ― like a guaranteed ending rather than a space to reach greater understanding or to simply to accept differences. I wasn't in touch with myself or my needs and, in fact, I felt guilty for having any, especially if they would hurt someone else.

But that's not unusual for my gender. Women in particular are socialized to be nice from a very young age, encouraged to ignore our own needs and put those of others first. "Ask nicely" and "be nice," we're taught as young girls, and so we learn that our words, when expressed honestly — or simply matter-of-factly — are rude. Causing discomfort is bad, we're told, but it's OK to have to swallow our own; in fact, it's something we should come to expect.

It's quite literally a matter of safety in many cases.

In my early 20s, I did a lot of solo travel around Europe, and once, while in the French surf town of Biarritz, I was hanging out with a guy who had been my surf instructor. We were at his apartment having a bite to eat and then, while we were hanging out after, he kissed me. It was a kiss I didn't want, and within a second, I calculated how careful I needed to be in my response, knowing that I was in a vulnerable position.

Feeling powerless, I asked him very nicely if he could take me home, and I held my breath until he agreed. Although he had violated my space, I didn't feel like I could demand anything in that moment, despite my overwhelming need to; instead, it came out as a polite request. I realize how lucky I was, and how many women's stories end very differently than mine.

Much more recently, I was catcalled by two men on my way home from a run. Although I immediately came up with a viciously clever comeback, I held it back, afraid to be mean, even in response to their objectification. I was aware of the fact that I was outnumbered, and I wasn't willing to risk an unfavorable response. So I swallowed the discomfort of the moment instead, probably even with a weak smile.

These are just some of the ways that women self-police their niceness.

We've even developed a vocal rhythm to accommodate this social need, with the ends of our sentences often trailing up into what teeters on uncertainty, a tendency known as "upspeak." We phrase our answers as though they are questions, not wanting to sound overly assertive or read as aggressive. Since the male voice is still the standard that women are compared to, especially in the workplace, the collaborative and welcoming intention of upspeak gets discounted as holding less gravitas and is judged as less decisive and authoritative.

Women's tone of voice is also policed, with those who speak in too high-pitched of a tone being labelled as "shrill." This charge is thrown at women in broadcasting in particular, who use technologies that are biased towards male voices in the first place, and distort a woman's.

Women of color face the harshest tone-policing, having to fight the "angry black woman" trope both in life and in the workplace, always aware of how they are presenting in a society still ruled by white supremacy. Just as male spaces have historically been hostile to women, white spaces create a multi-layered lose-lose situation for women of color.

Women are also less likely to ask for what they want in the workplace, after having been socialized from a young age to put the needs of others first; this is in addition to the very real fear of being labeled as aggressive when they do ask. Particularly when working in typically male-dominated fields, women are quicker to be labeled as "bossy," "emotional," or "bitchy," even by other women, a sign of how internalized misogyny lingers inside many of us.

Recovering from being a "nice" person has been an ongoing examination of how much my identity has relied on the external validation of others and how deeply the need to be "nice" embedded itself.

As Harrier Braiker wrote in her book "The Disease to Please: Curing the People-Pleasing Syndrome," a people pleaser's sense of identity is based on an image of niceness, as they are "deeply attached to seeing themselves ― and to being certain that others see them ― as nice people."

During my early recovery from people-pleasing, I developed a painful amount of self-awareness. I watched myself like a hawk, examining my every interaction with the outside world. Did I go out of my way to be friendly to that barista so that they would think I'm nice? Had I hoped that the person I opened the door for would think, "Wow, what a great person she is?"

Letting go of this need for control over others' impressions of me was part of recovery, and it's something I've had to do repeatedly. I've had to deprogram the "nice" out of me, knowing that my first instinct with others might still be based on these old patterns.

When you're nice, it kind of feels like everything is your responsibility, or at least within your control — how other people feel, how good your relationships are, how people treat you. Giving up "nice" means giving in to the fact that none of these things are solely within your power because you can only ever be in control of your side of the equation.

The irony of being nice to others was that I was often unkind to myself, because the underlying message was that I needed to perform in order to gain love or approval. "Nice" is transactional, but "kind" means that you can give or receive genuinely, because you know that you're worthy.

I find myself being less disappointed now because I expect less; I'm able to genuinely give, without the expectation of a return. I keep more energy and love for myself.

Giving up "nice" has meant giving to myself first, and it's helped me rethink selfishness. I know that I have to take care of myself in order to be a good mother, for example, and that is a good thing to model for my daughter.

Giving up "nice" has also meant letting relationships end sometimes, because I've bent to a limit but now know how to stop before I break. It means being able to stop trying, because I know that a relationship doesn't rest solely on my shoulders.

I'm no longer afraid of confrontation because I'm no longer afraid to have needs, to put myself first, to stop reducing myself — and to swallow discomfort when it comes to pointing out that speck in someone's teeth, or the one in my relationship.

found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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Jan 12, 2022 09:38AM - edited Jan 12, 2022 09:38AM by DivineMrsM

Maya Angelou becomes first Black woman to appear on US quarter as Treasury begins distribution

By Sarah Fortinsky and Devan Cole, CNN

January 10, 2022

Maya Angelou, American Women Quarters Program.


Washington (CNN)

A new US quarter featuring the late Maya Angelou went into circulation Monday, the US Mint announced, making the legendary poet and activist the first Black woman ever to appear on the coin.

The Maya Angelou quarter is the first in the American Women Quarters Program, which will include coins featuring prominent women in American history. Other quarters in the series will begin rolling out later this year and through 2025, the Mint said in a release on Monday.

"Each time we redesign our currency, we have the chance to say something about our country -- what we value, and how we've progressed as a society," Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in a separate statement. "I'm very proud that these coins celebrate the contributions of some of America's most remarkable women, including Maya Angelou."

    Writer Maya Angelou attends the memorial celebration for Odetta at Riverside Church on February 24, 2009, in New York City.
    Writer Maya Angelou attends the memorial celebration for Odetta at Riverside Church on February 24, 2009, in New York City.



    The new coin still features George Washington's visage on the "heads" side, while the "tails" side honors Angelou by evoking one of her most famous works, the autobiography "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings."

      Lawmakers cheered the release of the new coin on Monday and credited Rep. Barbara Lee, a California Democrat, with the achievement. Lee introduced the Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020, which passed in January 2021 and ultimately paved the way for the creation of these new coins.

        "The phenomenal women who shaped American history have gone unrecognized for too long -- especially women of color," Lee said in a tweet. "Proud to have led this bill to honor their legacies."

          The US Mint invited the public to submit names of women they view as American icons. The bureau welcomed entries of women known for their work in civil rights, science and the arts, among other areas, with an emphasis on women from "ethnically, racially and geographically diverse backgrounds." The only requirement was that the women who appear on the coins must be deceased.

            The agency will issue four other quarters this year, with the others honoring Sally Ride, an astronaut who was the first American woman in space; Asian American actress Anna May Wong; Cherokee Nation leader Wilma Mankiller and suffragette and politician Nina Otero-Warren.

              found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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              Jan 13, 2022 01:30AM DivineMrsM wrote:

              Civil Rights Icon Ida B. Wells Is Commemorated With A Barbie Doll

              "When kids learn about heroes like Ida B. Wells, they don't just imagine a better future -- they know they have the power to make it come true," toymaker Mattel said.

              Josephine Harvey01/12/2022 01:02am EST

              Famed Black journalist and activist Ida B. Wells is the latest female historical icon to be immortalized as a Barbie doll.

              Mattel's Barbie brand announced that Wells was the latest addition to its Inspiring Women series, which spotlights role models who paved the way for generations of girls.

              "When kids learn about heroes like Ida B. Wells, they don't just imagine a better future ― they know they have the power to make it come true," the company said.

              Wells, born into slavery during the Civil War, fought racism, sexism and violence in her work as a prominent journalist who exposed injustices against Black people in the South in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She led an anti-lynching movement, traveled nationwide and abroad to expose the practice at great personal risk, and went on to participate in the founding of the NAACP.

              Other Barbies in the collection have included Maya Angelou, Florence Nightingale, Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosa Parks, Billie Jean King and Ella Fitzgerald.

              found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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              Jan 13, 2022 10:46AM Nkb wrote:

              I just finished I know why the caged bird sings.

              I hope that they keep looking for heroes when making currency and naming buildings and schools etc. there are so many heroes to choose from.


              Dx 12/2011, ILC, Both breasts, 6cm+, Stage IIIC, Grade 2, 34/40 nodes, ER+/PR+ Surgery 2/4/2012 Lymph node removal: Left, Right, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left, Right Chemotherapy 2/28/2012 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 9/11/2012 Hormonal Therapy 10/21/2012 Arimidex (anastrozole) Dx 5/2017, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 6/1/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Targeted Therapy 6/1/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Targeted Therapy 3/13/2019 Afinitor (everolimus) Hormonal Therapy 3/13/2019 Aromasin (exemestane) Chemotherapy 3/10/2020 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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              Jan 13, 2022 10:47AM Nkb wrote:

              I think that Maya Angelou was the one who said "when you know better, you do better". love that.

              Dx 12/2011, ILC, Both breasts, 6cm+, Stage IIIC, Grade 2, 34/40 nodes, ER+/PR+ Surgery 2/4/2012 Lymph node removal: Left, Right, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left, Right Chemotherapy 2/28/2012 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 9/11/2012 Hormonal Therapy 10/21/2012 Arimidex (anastrozole) Dx 5/2017, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 6/1/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Targeted Therapy 6/1/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Targeted Therapy 3/13/2019 Afinitor (everolimus) Hormonal Therapy 3/13/2019 Aromasin (exemestane) Chemotherapy 3/10/2020 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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              Jan 15, 2022 07:52AM magiclight wrote:

              Surgery 4/26/2015 Mastectomy: Left, Right Dx IDC, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1 Surgery
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              Jan 15, 2022 07:56AM magiclight wrote:

              Surgery 4/26/2015 Mastectomy: Left, Right Dx IDC, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1 Surgery
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              Jan 15, 2022 08:09AM MinusTwo wrote:

              Magic - glad you posted this. I had never heard of him & I did go read the Wiki coverage.

              2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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              Jan 15, 2022 08:19AM Miriandra wrote:

              Here's a pic of the monument. It's beautiful.

              Mothers of Gynecology monument

              Monument Unveiled in Montgomery

              Dx 5/31/2019, DCIS/IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, 0/1 nodes, ER+ Surgery 8/14/2019 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left
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              Jan 15, 2022 08:23AM MinusTwo wrote:

              Thanks Mirirandra. It is a wonderful statue. But WTF - "did not believe black people could feel pain..."????

              2/15/11 BMX-DCIS 2SNB clear-TEs; 9/15/11-410gummies; 3/20/13 recurrance-5.5cm,mets to lymphs, Stage IIIB IDC ER/PRneg,HER2+; TCH/Perjeta/Neulasta x6; ALND 9/24/13 1/18 nodes 4.5cm; AC chemo 10/30/13 x3; herceptin again; Rads Feb2014
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              Jan 15, 2022 08:41AM Miriandra wrote:

              I know, right? Sadly, that attitude persists in modern medicine still. Women in general frequently report that their complaints of pain are dismissed or trivialized by medical staff, but women of color have even worst statistics in getting support for pain management.

              Dx 5/31/2019, DCIS/IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, 0/1 nodes, ER+ Surgery 8/14/2019 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left
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              Jan 15, 2022 11:05AM DivineMrsM wrote:

              Thanks for the monument information and photo. I was aware of the doctor considered the father of gynecology and his abuse towards black women but was not aware of this particular monument in Alabama remembering three of the enslaved women.

              In a related story, there was a monument in Central Park, NYC of Sims that was removed in 2018 and moved to the cemetery where he’s buried. Two other monuments of Sims exist in South Carolina and Alabama.

              found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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              Jan 15, 2022 08:17PM Jelson wrote:

              Please note that in the not too distant past, it was the norm to not provide pain relief to newborns undergoing surgery based on the belief that newborns do not experience pain. www.washingtonpost.com/archive... How convenient and cruel these assumptions about pain perception have been. In one situation, the cries of pain were ignored, in the other, the patients were rendered unable to cry out.

              Dx 4/17/2009, DCIS, <1cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/0 nodes, ER+/PR+
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              Jan 16, 2022 12:08AM magiclight wrote:

              Mirianda...thanks for the monument image.

              Surgery 4/26/2015 Mastectomy: Left, Right Dx IDC, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1 Surgery
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              20 hours ago DivineMrsM wrote:


              *************


              found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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              19 hours ago illimae wrote:

              Divine, I’ve always had a problem with that one, arggg. Stealing that one 🙂

              Diagnosed at 41 Stage IV De Novo Dx 11/16/2016, IDC, Left, 5cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 3, 3/13 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/2/2017 Abraxane (albumin-bound or nab-paclitaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/2/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 1/2/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Surgery 6/26/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary Radiation Therapy 8/10/2017 Breast, Lymph nodes Dx 10/5/2017, IDC, Left, 5cm, Stage IV, metastasized to brain, Grade 3, 3/13 nodes, ER+, HER2+ (IHC) Radiation Therapy 10/20/2017 External: Brain Radiation Therapy 4/18/2018 External: Brain Radiation Therapy 5/23/2019 External: Brain Surgery 1/22/2020 Radiation Therapy 2/17/2020 External: Brain Radiation Therapy 7/20/2020 External: Bone Radiation Therapy 12/4/2020 External: Brain Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Targeted Therapy Tukysa (tucatinib) Chemotherapy Xeloda (capecitabine)
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              18 hours ago exbrnxgrl wrote:

              Sadly, that is the only way for some to realize the worth of all women. Lack of empathy for others is a real problem for all civil societies.

              Bilateral mx 9/7/11 with one step ns reconstruction. As of 11/21/11, 2cm met to upper left femur Dx 7/8/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/7/2011 Lymph node removal: Left; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left); Reconstruction (right) Dx 11/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Stage IV, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 11/21/2011 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 11/21/2011 Bone Hormonal Therapy 6/19/2014 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane)
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              16 hours ago Nkb wrote:


              This is a response I read from Betsy Rose a singer activist who a man called out about a joke she posted about women being a better choice to help out on Christmas Day

              “In my decades of public life as singer and song leader lifting up women's hidden/silenced stories and truths, I definitely have encountered discomfort on some women's part, the concern that this lifting the veil and breaking the silence is somehow hurtful to men, and should be softened to protect their feelings. Leslie, I honor this care and tender heartedness, your sense of fairness,BUT my growth as a woman ( and I'm in a lifelong committed relationship with a man) has led me to realize that I can't always BOTH speak truth and liberate my own mind and heart and hopefully others, while at the same time protecting and softening the message for men. And humor is such a bouyant way for all of us-men to- to acknowledge some truths that many are learning to face and grow from. My partner had a good chuckle when I read this quip to him. There is this term "Male Fragility", which names the way that those used to being in the dominant privileged position in society have very little stamina and resilience for hearing some truth from those who live under that system and don't benefit from it as they do. (We are probably all familiar with "White Fragility"-))I've come to trust that men can grow, can self examine, can change, and if they aren't ready or willing, it is NOT MY WORK TO DO FOR THEM!! Thanks for this conversation- its a familiar and challenging one!“

              Dx 12/2011, ILC, Both breasts, 6cm+, Stage IIIC, Grade 2, 34/40 nodes, ER+/PR+ Surgery 2/4/2012 Lymph node removal: Left, Right, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left, Right Chemotherapy 2/28/2012 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 9/11/2012 Hormonal Therapy 10/21/2012 Arimidex (anastrozole) Dx 5/2017, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 6/1/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Targeted Therapy 6/1/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Targeted Therapy 3/13/2019 Afinitor (everolimus) Hormonal Therapy 3/13/2019 Aromasin (exemestane) Chemotherapy 3/10/2020 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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              6 hours ago DivineMrsM wrote:

              Nkb, I love the thoughtful response of Betty Rose. “Male fragility” makes me gag. I think it is used to try and shame women and minorities for wanting, thinking they could be, should have equality. She’s also right that the conversation is a familiar one as well as challenging.

              She says, emphatically in caps, it’s not her job to do the work for men to grow, self examine and change. This resonates with me because I’ve been working for several years on setting firmer boundaries in my life, and one key message I’ve learned is it’s not my responsibility to make sure others are responsible. It took awhile for me to let go of this expectation of myself that I had to do so much for others but now that I’ve got a better handle on it, it’s very freeing. So I like that Betty Rose really puts that out there so assertively.


              found lump 12-22-10—ilc—er+/pr+/her2—stage iv bone mets—chemo~lumpectomy~radiation~arimidex—March 2019-ibrance/aromasin* —Sept 2019-verzenio* —March 2020-xeloda*
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              5 hours ago exbrnxgrl wrote:

              Wow! I truly thought I would never have anything good to say about mbc. It is most certainly not a gift but I believe it has allowed me not to feel responsible for everyone else’s happiness and comfort. I have no idea how long/short my life will be and I need to be very selective about how I spend my time and emotional strength.

              Bilateral mx 9/7/11 with one step ns reconstruction. As of 11/21/11, 2cm met to upper left femur Dx 7/8/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 9/7/2011 Lymph node removal: Left; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left); Reconstruction (right) Dx 11/2011, IDC, Left, 4cm, Stage IV, Grade 1, 1/15 nodes, mets, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 11/21/2011 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 11/21/2011 Bone Hormonal Therapy 6/19/2014 Femara (letrozole) Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane)

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