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Topic: How to cut out sugar? Study links BC to high sucrose diet.

Forum: Healthy Recipes for Everyday Living — A place to share our "healthier" recipes and food tips for everyday life.

Posted on: Jan 5, 2016 09:14PM

Tinkerbells wrote:

Hi all,

There was a recent study linking BC rates and recurrence to high sucrose (table sugar) diets. I do not necessarily believe I should rush to believe every word of this study - as we know studies go back and forth on nutritional advice - however i admit the one part of my diet that still absolutely stinks is my dessert consumption. I am about 7 pounds above my healthy weight and I have no doubt that cutting back on the refined sugars will do this.

Not only am I looking for suggestions for how to kick the dessert habit - but was wondering if anyone knew what would entail a sugar free diet. It's just table sugar, sucrose, they are talking about? Not fructose found naturally in fruit? And if I go sugar free - will artificial sweeteners like Stevia cause a similar effect in my body?

Thanks in advance for any and all advice - I'd like to kick this ridiculous addiction to sweets to the curb once and for all.

Contains some artificial additives and preservatives. Dx 2/25/2014, IDC, 1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 1/2 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Dx 2/25/2014, DCIS, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery 3/1/2014 Mastectomy: Left, Right Chemotherapy 4/10/2014 AC Targeted Therapy 6/1/2014 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 6/1/2014 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy 6/1/2014 Taxol (paclitaxel)
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Jan 5, 2016 09:32PM patoo wrote:

Tinkerbells, it can be very difficult to cut out sugar if you have DH and/or kids at home. If you are alone then you don't bring them into the house. But don't try and go cold turkey because that does not work for most people. If you have others at home then maybe start by only allowing yourself dessert 2x/week then 1x/wee, every other week, etc., or only have dessert if you have done something extra, out of the ordinary, special, for someone. Maybe when you feel the urge you do the 20/20/20 rule - drink 20 ozs of water and wait 20 minutes during which time you do another activity that will take an additional 20 minutes. The urge may then go away. Different things work for different people and you will need to find what works to take your mind off of eating.

Good luck.Hug


"for we live by faith, not by sight" - 2 Corinthians 5:7 Dx 10/24/2008, ILC, 1cm, Stage IB, Grade 1, 0/5 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 2/11/2009 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 4/1/2009 Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right; Lymph node removal: Right, Sentinel
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Jan 5, 2016 10:09PM glennie19 wrote:

Trying following a Paleo or Primal diet,,, look for one of their cookbooks, or other low-carb cookbooks. It's very hard to cut it out completely,, so the suggestion of not bringing it home, is an excellent one. Then you could splurge once a week if you eat out. I have found that cakes, etc, are now too sweet for me since cutting back,, and I rarely have any. My splurge is for ice cream.

Fibromyalgia and Truncal Lymphedema,,, some of the fun things I live with. Total hysterecomy 9/29/14 Prophy MX Righty 11/30/17 Dx 6/27/2013, Paget's, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 8/7/2013 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left Dx DCIS
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Jan 5, 2016 10:36PM - edited Jan 5, 2016 10:37PM by labelle

I follow a Paleo diet and have for almost 2 years. Stevia is a natural sweetener, not an artificial one, and it is permitted on a Paleo diet. Stevia does not cause blood glucose levels to rise. Honey and maple syrup (real maple syrup not the stuff made with corn syrup) are also allowed on a Paleo diet, but like regular processed sugar, cause blood glucose levels to rise. Like most who follow a Paleo diet, I don't use them often or in large quantities. When baking/making treats I often use recipes calling for coconut sugar instead (stevia is hard to bake with, I mostly use it in my tea). Coconut sugar causes blood glucose levels to rise, but only about half as much at reg sugar/honey/maple syrup and can be used to replace regular sugar (one cup coconut sugar equals one cup reg sugar) so you can easily use it as a substitute in just about anything .

I've found a Paleo diet and lifestyle to be sustainable, unlike many diets I tried over the years, but cooking everything (nearly) from scratch can be time consuming and it can be expensive. For those who've had BC adhering to the grassfed only/no hormones added meats is I think especially important, but they can be pricey. We buy a meat CSA direct from the farm, which is cheaper than buying meat at Whole Foods or Trader Joes but still more than regular supermarket prices and not an option everywhere. Ditto for fresh and organic veggies. Meat and veggies are primary to a Paleo diet. On the other hand, we save money but not buying bread products, chips, sodas, dairy (grassfed butter or ghee once in awhile), fast foods, etc.

Dx 9/29/2014, IDC: Tubular, Left, <1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 1, 1/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 11/12/2014 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jan 5, 2016 10:55PM - edited Jan 5, 2016 11:01PM by BarredOwl

Hi Tinkerbells:

From an overall health perspective, most can agree upon limiting "added sugar" (see below). It is found in a lot of processed foods, fruit juices and other drinks, flavored yogurts, many cereals, etc., and adds up very quickly. I used to exceed my daily recommended dietary limit on added sugar at breakfast (cranberry juice and cereal).

When I reduced added sugar, and also cut milk (other than as a condiment), cheese, and ice cream, I lost ~16 pounds. So far, I have had little trouble keeping it off. I eat most meals at home, which makes things a lot easier. I have no willpower, so I try to keep cookies and candy out my house. I replaced fruit juice with whole fruit and eat steel cut oats for breakfast. For snacks, I have nuts, fruit, or plain yogurt, and an occasional square of 70-85% chocolate (no one is perfect). At home, dessert means fruit.

I like to read bad press about added sugar to help motivate myself to avoid it. Here are some of my favorite reading materials for motivating sugar avoidance and other dietary changes:

(1) "Added sugar" in the diet, names on food labels, and recommended dietary limits: 6 teaspoons or 24 grams of sugar per day for women

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/carboh...

(2) Bob Lustig in Time Magazine on Added Sugar - First paragraph includes a link to his famous You Tube video

http://ideas.time.com/2012/12/27/what-you-need-to-...

Dr. Lustig is a pretty entertaining speaker. He also considers fructose a culprit.

(3) Gary Taubes' NYT Article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17S...

Mr. Taubes also gives a link to Bob Lustig's video.

Mr. Taubes also wrote a book which is basically the long form of the NYT article: "Good Calories, Bad Calories - Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease". I follow more of a Mediterranean diet, so personally I do not recommend eating large amounts of animal protein, but these materials do provide information about why sugar may be detrimental metabolically.

(4) Sugarscience.org

http://www.sugarscience.org

Commenting on draft guidelines:

http://www.sugarscience.org/sugarscience-response-...

On this page, at right, see the list of ingredient names indicating the presence of "added sugar":

http://www.sugarscience.org/hidden-in-plain-sight/...

Hope you can find some inspiration here.

BarredOwl

Stage IA IDC, 9/2013 BMX. Right: IDC (1.5 mm, grade 2) with DCIS (5+ cm), 0/4 nodes, pN0. Left: DCIS (5+ cm), 0/1 node, pN0(i+).
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Jan 6, 2016 01:40AM Tinkerbells wrote:

THANK YOU! Some really great ideas. And BarredOwl, thanks for the links. In my hearts, I know that there are other sugars that I should be cutting out, but I'm trying to have a realistic perspective on this. I think that if I start with table sugar, and processed desserts, I will see significant progress in and of itself. I like the paleo idea of coconut sugar and stevia, because as Patoo points out, there is my family to consider. Ironically, I do most of my own baking because my husband has food allergies - and because we don't keep all that much around, I indulge while out to eat. I think the study linking BC and mets to high sugar consumption (although one study is not enough to make a conclusion) is giving me the inspiration to cut the sugar cord. I love fruit, so that won't be cut out. Let's see how I do with saving my sugar fix for an occasional treat.


Thanks again!

Contains some artificial additives and preservatives. Dx 2/25/2014, IDC, 1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 1/2 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Dx 2/25/2014, DCIS, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery 3/1/2014 Mastectomy: Left, Right Chemotherapy 4/10/2014 AC Targeted Therapy 6/1/2014 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 6/1/2014 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy 6/1/2014 Taxol (paclitaxel)
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Jan 6, 2016 02:25AM labelle wrote:

When I switched to a Paleo diet I drug my reluctant husband and stepson (now 17) along - he eats a SAD diet at his mother's but pretty much Paleo here and frequently returns to our home exclaiming about how happy he is to be back at the house with "real" food . I really don't think you should worry about "cutting the sugar cord" on other family members. Sugar is not good for anyone, it makes us fat and rots our teeth and has no nutritional value. Family members will not suffer (but they might complain) if sugar is removed from the entire family's diet. I wish I'd done it sooner, when all the children were still at home so they might have benefited from a healthier diet and learned better eating habits.

Dx 9/29/2014, IDC: Tubular, Left, <1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 1, 1/11 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Surgery 11/12/2014 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jan 6, 2016 02:31AM glennie19 wrote:

I would also suggest: That Sugar Book by Damon Gameau. Damon did an experiment where he ate 40 tsp of sugar every day for 60 days,, but only in "healthy" foods. What happened is quite interesting. There is also a movie about it, That Sugar Film.

Fibromyalgia and Truncal Lymphedema,,, some of the fun things I live with. Total hysterecomy 9/29/14 Prophy MX Righty 11/30/17 Dx 6/27/2013, Paget's, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 8/7/2013 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left Dx DCIS
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Jan 6, 2016 05:44AM LM070917 wrote:

I switched to a no sugar diet as soon as I was diagnosed. I still eat fruit and choose raw ingredients (not processed) to sweeten things up. Fruits including dates, figs, cocoa, honey (unprocessed) are great additions, without being unhealthy

Dx 9/18/2015, IDC, Right, 6cm+, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 2/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 10/31/2015 AC + T (Taxol) Surgery Lymph node removal: Right, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Lymph nodes, Chest wall Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole), Zoladex (goserelin)
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Jan 6, 2016 06:12AM - edited Jan 6, 2016 06:14AM by ChiSandy

With a few backslides, I've been nearly sugar-free (and that includes most starches, since they become sugar very quickly) since early 2013. I still got diagnosed in Aug. 2015, but having lost 50 lbs. on that regimen I think I bounced back from surgery more easily than had I still tipped the scales at 225. You have to include ALL simple carbs (refined flours & grains, potatoes, honey and maple syrup) under the rubric of “sugar." It's a bummer--especially if, like me, you love good pasta, artisanal breads and quality pizza--but it's doable. Of all the diets I've ever been on, it's the most versatile and easy to stick to when traveling (at least domestically). Nothing to have to weigh or measure, no exchanges or points to calculate, no tradeoffs. You can either eat a particular food or you can’t. I know that wherever I am and no matter how late it is after a show or on the road, I can always get a burger patty, string cheese, nuts, or hard boiled egg--wherever there's a mini-mart there's a “permissible" meal or snack, even if not exactly delectable. Almost any sit-down-get-served restaurant will let you sub out a green salad, non-starchy veg, or tomato slices for a starch, and will cook your protein without dredging it in flour, crumbs or batter. And you can always get plain iced tea, soda water or ice water with a slice of lemon. (Diet soda, because it tastes sweet, will make your pancreas reflexively release insulin just as much as will sugared soda--but when your body realizes it's been duped and there's no “incoming" sugar for the insulin to mop up, insulin does its other job and promotes storage and inhibits burning of fat).

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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Jan 6, 2016 06:24AM grammakathy wrote:

I read a book titled Mindless Eating (I think that was the name) and it talked about how easy it is to gain a pound a year if you aren't careful. And that was the story of what I was doing. I decided to change my pattern and eliminate desserts, candy, and diet soda. My motivation was when my MO told me that I had estrogen in my extra pounds that could feed stray cancer cells in my lymph system or blood. So on December 2, 2013 I started my plan of not eating sweets, drinking water and walking 7500 steps a day. It took me a year but I lost 50 pounds. Another year has passed and I'm down another 5 pounds and am back to the weight I was before my first pregnancy in 1973. I've never been good at diets and I hate exercise so I had to make choices that would work for me.
Oncotype DX score of 11; 5'10" tall, 155#, Allergan 410 FF425 implants, diagnosed at age 63, 3D tattoos on 23 Jun 2015 Dx 10/2/2013, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IB, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 10/24/2013 Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left Hormonal Therapy 11/26/2013 Arimidex (anastrozole) Surgery 2/25/2014 Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Surgery 9/23/2014 Reconstruction (left); Reconstruction (right) Hormonal Therapy 12/18/2014 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Jan 6, 2016 07:33AM LM070917 wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/120773...


Sugar, Coke and cancer link

Dx 9/18/2015, IDC, Right, 6cm+, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, 2/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 10/31/2015 AC + T (Taxol) Surgery Lymph node removal: Right, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Lymph nodes, Chest wall Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole), Zoladex (goserelin)
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Jan 6, 2016 10:55PM Tinkerbells wrote:

Thanks, gals. My MO has mentioned the recent studies that show even a small weight loss reduces the chances of my recurrence (hormone negative). With that in mind, I am very motivated. It took almost 2 years but here I am. Wish me luck kicking those last few pesky pounds!


Contains some artificial additives and preservatives. Dx 2/25/2014, IDC, 1cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 1/2 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Dx 2/25/2014, DCIS, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery 3/1/2014 Mastectomy: Left, Right Chemotherapy 4/10/2014 AC Targeted Therapy 6/1/2014 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 6/1/2014 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy 6/1/2014 Taxol (paclitaxel)
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Jan 7, 2016 01:44AM ChiSandy wrote:

I have done lots of reading on the subject of the effects of dietary sugar, mainly by Marion Nestle, Gary Taubes, and MDs Robert Lustig and Michael Hyman. I also read exposes (I forget the author--need to check my Kindle app) of why the amount of sugar, salt and fat in processed food is manipulated by the food mfrs., as well as how flavor profiles are determined (to reach the “bliss point”) to maximize sales of food products (which manipulation is often done with synthetic chemicals). Then there’s Michael Pollan’s “The Omnivore’s Dilemma,” which devotes an entire section (not just chapter) to corn and its role in our food supply: history, uses (in things you’d never believe such as additives, caffeine synthesis, even packaging, as well as animal feed) and effects in not just our bodies but those of animals in the food chain. You are what you eat, acc. to the late Adelle Davis, but you are ultimately also what you eat eats. A real eye-opener! An example: cattle (especially) and hogs did not evolve to eat corn and other grains--it causes cattle tremendous digestive upset, including diarrhea. Then they spend the last parts of their lives standing in their own waste, and so are administered prophylactic antibiotics to keep them from getting infected and their meat from sickening us. As a result of food-animal-industry use of antibiotics, bacteria resistant to them have evolved--which may soon become the biggest health crisis affecting society. That’s why I don’t eat grain-fed meat.

Diagnosed at 64 on routine annual mammo, no lump. OncotypeDX 16. I cried because I had no shoes...but then again, I won’t get blisters.... Dx 9/9/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 9/23/2015 Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy 11/2/2015 3DCRT: Breast Hormonal Therapy 12/31/2015 Femara (letrozole)
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Jan 7, 2016 06:24PM SelenaWolf wrote:

Keep in mind - when reading studies linking high sucrose diets with increased cancer risk - is that the people who eat way too much sugar, are more likely to have other lifestyle risk factors (i.e., obesity, smoking, lack of exercise) predisposing them to an increased cancer risk, as well. These confounding factors can muddy the issue. However, that said, not adding sugar to what you eat is a good, overall, healthy thing to do.

"... good girls never made history ..."
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Jul 28, 2016 01:45AM __asher__ wrote:

There's great information here, thanks.

Lotte- really good article. Thanks for sharing. Made me realize I have some work to do with myself and my family.

Selena- good point.

Tina Dx 2/9/2016, DCIS, Right, 4cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/30 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 2/23/2016 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy 2/23/2016 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 2/23/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Surgery Mastectomy: Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Left Surgery Prophylactic ovary removal Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes Targeted Therapy Herceptin (trastuzumab) Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole)
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Aug 9, 2016 07:31AM Momine wrote:

Thanks for posting about That Sugar Book. The guy's site has some good recipes and ideas: http://thatsugarfilm.com/act-now/recipes/


Dx 6/1/2011, ILC, 5cm, Stage IIIB, Grade 2, 7/23 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 6/20/2011 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Ellence (epirubicin), Fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, Adrucil), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 9/13/2011 Mastectomy: Left, Right Radiation Therapy 1/9/2012 Surgery 3/8/2012 Prophylactic ovary removal Hormonal Therapy 4/1/2012 Femara (letrozole)
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Aug 9, 2016 03:34PM - edited Apr 30, 2017 05:18PM by SpecialK

My former boss has fairly intense arthritis in her hands and must have manual dexterity to maintain her license in the lab, and her husband found a diet online that was purported to be anti-inflammatory. She started it and within a week could make a fist and stop her pain meds. She was probably an evenly distributed size 10 at the time - not a person I would have said needed to lose weight. She didn't start the diet to lose weight but lost 20 lbs. without exercise, and is now a size 4. This is an elimination diet, taking out the foods most likely to cause inflammation due to people being either allergic or sensitive to them. This is a hard diet to follow, one ends up eating foods in their mostly whole form, and not being able to eat many things most people enjoy, almost nothing processed, and it is harder to eat in restaurants - but not impossible. I have ended up like the character in When Harry Met Sally when I order in restaurants, I ask them to leave things out, or have them on the side, etc. I was having trouble with AI induced joint pain and weight gain from chemo, with difficulty getting it off - despite daily exercise (5 fast miles) and calorie restriction/sensible eating (1,500 calories - mainly Mediterranean type foods). I tried this way of eating and lost 22 lbs over six months, also without exercise - due to having three surgeries during the six months of weight loss. This diet cuts out sugar (in many forms), dairy, soy, corn, peanuts, gluten and eggs. It is very similar to Paleo but without dairy and eggs. After three weeks you can add things back in, in an isolated way, to determine whether something causes you problems - if it does, you leave it out, if it doesn't you may be able to add it back in. This diet also advocates lean clean meats/poultry/fish, and organic and low-glycemic vegs/fruits. Part of the inflammatory aspect is the food itself that causes issues - dairy/sugar/peanuts/gluten/eggs, part of it is that some food is doused in pesticide - particularly the soy and corn in the US, and part of it is what your protein sources are being fed. There are many who advocate "everything in moderation" but that doesn't work for me personally, or they feel that cutting out whole food groups is too restrictive, but I feel and look better eating this way. This is a synopsis of the diet, I would probably not buy the book, but if you want or need a book, I would buy the recipe book - it covers the premise of the diet fully.

http://www.chewfo.com/diets/the-virgin-diet-by-jj-virgin-2012-what-to-eat-and-foods-to-avoid-food-list/

BMX w/ TE 11/1/10, ALND 12/6/10. 15 additional surgeries. TCHx6 2/17-6/2/11. Herceptin until 1/19/12. Femara 8/1/11, Arimidex 6/20/12, back to Femara 6/18/13-present. Dx 9/27/2010, IDC, Right, 2cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 2/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Dx 9/27/2010, DCIS, Stage 0, Grade 3
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Aug 9, 2016 03:55PM leftduetostupidmods wrote:

I've been on Atkins for almost 3 years now. It's very doable and there are many recipes online. People think that low carb high fat is a bland diet, but I can tell you it's not. You can still have many tasty foods, the only thing is that you need to (gasp!) take time and prepare some. Yes, I eat pizza, bread, cake, raw veggies and fruit (just berries though, and no blueberries).

I lost 52 lbs in the first 18 months (all the weight I had put on due to surgeries, chemo and AIs). I've had two uptake spots on a bone scan two years ago, this year one is gone, the other is still there unchanged (about 5 mm on the first right rib). Onc said we'll start a ball rolling only if it starts growing, as he thinks that with my diet and lifestyle - whatever is there I keep it in check.

I joined a website when I started the LCHF - fatsecret.com. Lots of people on Atkins and many many recipes. And a great calculator for everything you are eating.

left this forum this time for good due to how stupid moderators are
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Aug 10, 2016 05:49AM mysunshine48 wrote:

Seachain, Why no blueberries? I eat a lot of them - only organic, but good antioxidants.

Dx 1/2015, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/2 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Chemotherapy 5/14/2015 TAC Chemotherapy 5/14/2015 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Chemotherapy 5/14/2015 Surgery 10/24/2015 Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Surgery Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Hormonal Therapy Arimidex (anastrozole)
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Aug 10, 2016 10:56AM leftduetostupidmods wrote:

HIgh carb content. 21.5 g per serving, with 3.6 g of fiber, that brings you to 17.6 g of net carbs, of which 15g of sugar. That is way high. especially if you go induction (max 20g of netcarbs daily).

Of the other berries, per serving, the blackberries have the least (6 g netcarbs), next are raspberries (7 g netcarbs), then strawberries (8 g netcarbs).

Anyway, you shouldn't have berries at all until you're off induction, and at a 30-40 g netcarbs daily intake.

As a general rule of thumb, for anything you eat, from the total g of carbohydrates, you deduct the g of fiber and any sugar alcohol content to obtain the g of netcarbs. Start with induction (20 g carbs daily) until you're 10-15 lbs from your weight goal, then add 5 g each week until you notice you don't lose weight anymore but don't gain either. That is your carb balance. There are a few key facts you must follow if you want to be successful:

1. drink at least 6 x 8 oz glasses water a day

2. make sure you sleep at least 7 hours a day

3. do some exercise

4. make sure you eat enough salt otherwise you'll deplete yourself of electrolytes.

5. eat enough fiber of the approved vegetables otherwise you face constipation issues

6. make sure your daily intake stays around 65-70% fat, 15-20% protein, 10-15% carbs.

It takes 2-4 days to enter ketosis (when your body starts using fat instead of carbs for energy) and the first 2 weeks are the hardest in terms of carbs craving, after which you have no more issues. yes, you can make lots of desserts and pastries using low carb flours (like coconut, almond or peanut flour) and very soon your cholesterol will be brought to normal (if you had any issues), same for blood pressure, and even type II diabetes resolves.


left this forum this time for good due to how stupid moderators are
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Aug 10, 2016 02:28PM johnsonflynt wrote:

Thanks, very interrestingThumbsUp

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Apr 18, 2017 02:25PM - edited Apr 18, 2017 02:28PM by Moderators

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Apr 30, 2017 04:14PM Susaine wrote:

Hello Tinkerbells,

Sugar is *Very dangerous to your health. If you are taking high Sugar on daily basis, then you need to stop immediately.

Sugar is a slow poison. It slowly kills your Pancreas, Kidneys and finally Lungs. (Same thing happened to one of my colleague).

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May 1, 2017 04:45AM edwards750 wrote:

What is taking high sugar mean? On a daily basis? So every other day is okay? I don't believe for a second it is poison. I think you need to follow my doctor's game plan - everything in moderation. He also says exercise is the most important thing you can do for yourself.

Diane

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May 3, 2017 03:18PM - edited May 3, 2017 03:20PM by claireinaz

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevent....

I offer the CDC's myth debunking page....FWIW. Read the note on sugar. If not eating sugar makes any of us feel more secure and protected from little "c", then of course--not eating it is a good thing to do.

9/29/11 ILC, 2 c. stage II grade 1, ER/PR+ HER2-, 6/11 nodes, lumpectomy, DDAC x 4, Taxol x 12, 33 rads, Tamoxifen/arimidex/aromasin, BMX/immed recon 7/3/13 "In the midst of winter, I found in me an invincible summer.” Albert Camus
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May 5, 2017 03:35AM edwards750 wrote:

To each her own. Of course if you believe abstaining from sugar totally keeps the C word away that's your call. I have several friends suffering from diabetes and have weight issues so the theory too much sugar can result in a diabetes DX seems more valid.

The bottom line is excess of anything can be harmful thus my doctor's everything in moderation advice.

Diane



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May 5, 2017 04:43PM Icantri wrote:

My dietician explained to me that the sugar-cancer connection has to do with insulin resistance. For those with this condition, cancer can grow more quickly.

She also said that if you are going to eat sugar, do it as an end to a healthy meal. This lowers its glycemic effects. Or something like that. :)

I personally avoid sugar like the plague because I am addicted to it. Eating it in moderation doesn't work for me as eating it only makes me want more. And more and more until that is all I want to eat. I do feel much better with that monkey off my back!
48 years old at diagnosis Dx 10/18/2016, IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 11/17/2016 Mastectomy: Right Hormonal Therapy 12/15/2016 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Nov 18, 2017 09:56AM Susaine wrote:

Hi Edward,

Can I know more in detail when can I eat the sugar, because I stopped using the sugar for last seven months.

There is drastic changes in my body. I lost nearly twenty pounds just not eating sugar that is processed one.


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Nov 18, 2017 02:48PM - edited Nov 18, 2017 02:49PM by Shellsatthebeach

Some may say I'm in denial, but I Don't believe sugar causes cancer, but at the same time I'm sure it is not good when the body is trying to heal. I'm thinking alcohol could actually be more harmful. I use to enjoy wine a few times a week, but have cut it out completely. I have also cut carbs as far as pasta and rice down to very low levels. Maybe once a week. I refuse to cut my sweet intact so will indulge two to three times a week. One of my in-laws is a super health freak for most of her life (everything is organic and strict vegan)and got BC. So, there goes sugar theory.

Dx 3/2017, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIIB, Grade 2, ER+, HER2- Surgery 8/28/2017 Lymph node removal; Mastectomy: Left Dx 9/15/2017, DCIS/IDC, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 6/10 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ Targeted Therapy 9/23/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Radiation Therapy 10/16/2017 Breast, Lymph nodes, Chest wall Targeted Therapy Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy AC + T (Taxotere)
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Nov 19, 2017 06:42AM Shellsatthebeach wrote:

I wonder if there has been studies on processed food, which in my opinion is poison. Sugar at least is not synthetic. In moderation it is probably fine. It is when other things are put in the mix like fat ratio which is the real killer for us estrogen positive gals because estrogen lives in fat. Losing that fat through exercise and eating a healthy diet which excludes processed foods I believe is key.


Dx 3/2017, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIIB, Grade 2, ER+, HER2- Surgery 8/28/2017 Lymph node removal; Mastectomy: Left Dx 9/15/2017, DCIS/IDC, Left, Stage IIIB, Grade 3, 6/10 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ Targeted Therapy 9/23/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Radiation Therapy 10/16/2017 Breast, Lymph nodes, Chest wall Targeted Therapy Perjeta (pertuzumab) Chemotherapy AC + T (Taxotere)

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