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Topic: LCIS newly diagnosed

Forum: LCIS (Lobular Carcinoma In Situ) — Just diagnosed, in treatment, or finished treatment for LCIS.

Posted on: Feb 3, 2020 05:43AM

HelloItsMe789 wrote:

I had a biopsy last week, after my mammogram showed increased calcifications and a few looked irregular. From that they determined I have LCIS.

My doctors office said I needed surgery and then we'd discuss chemo or radiation. A friend works for a breast cancer practice (and has had breast cancer), said yes, I do need surgery but no to chemo or radiation. She does say this increases my risk for invasive cancer in the future. I will be meeting with surgeons from both practices.

To the best of my knowledge there is no history of breast cancer in my family. A grandparent had colon cancer in the 1970s

I am 55 and have Hashimotos (I am probably not optimal on my meds). I am normally an active person, but have been taking it easy the past few years so as not to stress my adrenals. (it just seemed to put weight on my so I'm not sure about that theory)

My hormones have been all over the board for the past few years. I have not cycled in probably 2 years and my FSH tested high consistently over 2 years ago. I do take hormones to try and keep them in balance but they seem to change often.

I don't even know what I want to ask. I feel like my health has been a rollercoaster since my Hashi's dx in 2012 and now I am at the top of the ride and don't know if I'll make it back up the other side. I guess in a nutshell, I am terrified.

One thing I want to ask - did anyone actually feel something in their affected breast prior to diagnosis? I swear I have had tightness in my left breast for months now, but it's been put off as not being optimal on thyroid meds or adrenals. Right now it could be the healing from the biopsy. I know I have a heart murmur and will talk with my doctor about getting that checked out again.

Any thoughts, words of wisdom, or reading materials would be great.

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Feb 3, 2020 06:43AM Beesie wrote:

I don't have LCIS and I'm sure that others who do have LCIS will come by to reply soon, but until then, here's what I know.

First off, LCIS is not cancer.

And while surgery is recommended, the reason is to not remove the LCIS, but to ensure that nothing more serious is lurking in the area where the LCIS is. It's not uncommon with high risk conditions (ADH, ALH, LCIS) that sometimes a small area of cancer might be found mixed in with the high risk condition. I'm not sure with LCIS, but I know with ADH and ALH, this happens about 20% of the time. So a needle biopsy diagnosis of these conditions usually calls for an excisional biopsy (a surgical biopsy, similar to a lumpectomy) to remove the suspicious area to check to ensure that the only thing present is this high risk condition, and no cancer.

Neither chemo nor rads are required for LCIS. Was it a PCP who suggested that you may need chemo and rads? PCPs don't always understand the specifics of diagnoses, particularly something relatively rare like LCIS. Given your doctor's comment about chemo and rads, do you have a copy of your pathology report from the biopsy? Are you sure that your diagnosis is LCIS and not ILC?


Dx 9/15/2005 Right, 7cm+, DCIS-Mi, Stage IA, Gr 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR- ** Dx 01/16/2019 Left, 8mm, IDC, Stage IA, Gr 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- (FISH) ** Surgery 11/30/2005 MX Right, 03/06/2019 MX Left ** Hormonal Therapy 05/2019 Letrozole
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Feb 3, 2020 07:24AM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

Thanks for your reply. It was my GYN office that told me the results, and not even my regular doctor as she was off that day, and I pushed them for the results so I didn't have to wait all weekend (the biopsy place said they'd be ready Thursday so I was a wreck by Friday afternoon!)

I do not have a copy yet but I need to get it to my friends practice.

And yes, I am sure she said LCIS as she spelled it out, and was specific about in situ.

I realize that it is not specifically cancer but I am pretty floored about the higher risk in the future considering my family history. And to be frank, I have not mentioned this to my family yet to see if anything has changed that I don't know of (with aunts and cousins) because my family is a happy mix of "you'll be fine" as they walk away before you finish talking, and completely smothering harassment, and I need something in the middle.

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Feb 3, 2020 07:51AM Beesie wrote:

Ah, sounds like it's definitely LCIS then. Gyns are often not particularly knowledgable about breast issues either... their area of expertise is below the belt.

I emphasized "LCIS is not cancer" only to explain why standard cancer treatments such as chemo and rads are not considered for LCIS. But as a serious high risk condition, it's in some ways more difficult to get your head around LCIS than a breast cancer diagnosis. With a BC diagnosis, you automatically kick into high gear with testing and surgery and treatments, and while there are often many options and decisions to be made, there are clear treatment guidelines and lots of research. With high risk conditions and I think LCIS in particular (because I believe it's a bit higher risk than ADH and ALH, and more rare), the next steps are a lot less clear, there is less research on each of the options, and there is a lot more uncertainty, not just about what the future holds (which everyone with BC faces) but also about what's the right thing to do.

When do you see the surgeons?

And good luck dealing with your family. For lots of us, that's an extra element of stress!

Dx 9/15/2005 Right, 7cm+, DCIS-Mi, Stage IA, Gr 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR- ** Dx 01/16/2019 Left, 8mm, IDC, Stage IA, Gr 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- (FISH) ** Surgery 11/30/2005 MX Right, 03/06/2019 MX Left ** Hormonal Therapy 05/2019 Letrozole
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Feb 3, 2020 10:12AM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

I am lucky I have a supportive boyfriend and I've told a few friends. It's a delicate balance. I'm sure many have experienced the "why didn't you tell me" people, and those are often the ones that will cause the most stress so.....

Leave it to me to come up with something not as clear cut. And as far as why, I've heard and read everything from "it just happens" "we don't know" and "high estrogen" - and that I've had in the past year.

I have not heard from my GYN's place yet, and I have to get the pathology report to my friends place. I've also notified my primary and will see if she has anything to add. I saw her the day before the biopsy and we just tweaked some of my supplements. I suppose I should test all my hormones sooner rather than later to see where I sit with that. I currently take progesterone and want the doctors to have the full picture for my treatment.

And of course, I wonder what I may have done to help this along, diet, supplements, stress etc. I know it doesn't solve anything but I can't help it!

Thanks again

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Feb 3, 2020 02:57PM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

My actual gyn just called. I asked her about getting my sex hormones tested so that the surgeons knew exactly where I was. She said they they would put me on drugs after surgery to suppress my hormones so there was no need to get them tested. Yet my friends clinic said they don't necessarily recommend that.

I have an appt with one surgeon late this week and another next week. I think I'm going to go stare at a wall until then. :(

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Feb 4, 2020 09:22AM Lea7777 wrote:

"I don't even know what I want to ask."

It is overwhelming and scary. Sorry you find yourself in this situation. It's good you have supportive friends and especially a good boyfriend.

Some suggestions...

Inquire about genetic testing which is done with a blood sample. This will let you know if you have the BRCA gene which would further increase your odds of bc and affect how you go from here. Other genes are also tested for that might affect your decisions. Your family history is in your favor.

There are different kinds of LCIS. Ask if it is classic or pleomorphic. In fact, ask for the pathology report so you have all the facts. And from now on (if you have not been doing this) ask for the radiology report for each mammogram or MRI. Also get the pathology report from your excisional biopsy.

See if you can get annual MRIs (check insurance) and make sure your future mammograms are 3-D tomosynthisis, which you may be getting already.

It does not hurt to seek a 2nd opinion if you can afford it. Another point of view is always helpful I find. That second opinion might be from a "high risk breast clinic" with a nurse practitioner. It looks like you are following this option with your appts with 2 surgeons. You are being proactive.

In addition to surgeons, you may be referred to an oncologist to discuss preventive medications. One warning on any assessment tools the oncologist --or any of your docs--will likely use to estimate your future breast cancer risk: The most common assessment tools for women with atypia (such as LCIS) WAY overestimate the risk of future invasive breast cancer. Every "breast professional" I have dealt with and that total is over half a dozen, has emphasized this overstatement to me. It can be a shock to see numbers well over a 50% lifetime risk of breast cancer. But that high number, even if not accurate, can help you get additional screening such as an annual MRI, with insurance coverage.

I like to ask my doctors, "What would you suggest for yourself/mother/sister/wife (depending on age & gender of the doctor) if they had this diagnosis?"


"I wonder what I may have done to help this along, diet, supplements, stress etc."

A common reaction is to blame ourselves. Probably nothing you have done. Just like in the vast majority of cancer cases, people can't blame themselves for "giving themselves cancer." But a healthy diet and some stress management, along with exercise and limiting alcohol, can only help you going forward. No guilt.

"One thing I want to ask - did anyone actually feel something in their affected breast prior to diagnosis?"

I did not feel anything prior to my LCIS diagnosis and feeling something is not typical from what I know.


My doctors office said I needed surgery and then we'd discuss chemo or radiation.

As mentioned above, the surgery is to be sure there is no cancer lurking around the LCIS. Odds are with you that there is not. My surgeon said 80%-85% of the time, no cancer is found, which matches the statistics on most breast cancer sites. The chemo/radiation discussion would be IF the surgery found cancer.

Good luck to you.


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Feb 5, 2020 06:36AM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

Good morning! I have my mammogram images and reports, but they didn't include the pathology report even though they said everything was in there. So that's more work for me today.

I have a few extra pounds on me, but I do exercise and don't drink or smoke at all.

Are the 3D mammograms done with the same machine? If not, I asked about it and the technician said those don't catch everything. I currently do traditional plus an ultrasound.

Doesn't an MRI pump you full of dye first?

Both surgeons were picked for me by two different providers, but when I looked them up I discovered they are under the same umbrella. So I don't think I will follow through with the second one unless I don't like the first. I do have other options for a second opinion though.

I realize the odds are with me, but the odds were with me that the biopsy was nothing and that didn't happen. I had a close friend die from cancer recently, and he only had weeks once they found it. It's hard to be positive with those issues, but I am trying.

Thanks for taking the time to reply!

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Feb 5, 2020 11:36AM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

The pathology report says pleomorphic with focal calcifications and minimal comedonecrosis. It goes on to say comedonecrosis and calcifications are atypical in LCIS.

None of that sounds good to me.

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Feb 5, 2020 11:47AM rtucker wrote:

Hi Helloits me,


I am new to this forum too. I have Classic LCIS and monitored every six months by MRI and bilateral mammogram. The MRI dye will go through your arm so the the pictures are clearer on the MRI to read. I have been on aromosin to reduce the risk factor down drastically. I am also having genetic testing done too because I am an Ashkenazi Jewish. I worry too, but you will be monitored and will get use to it after a while. It’s a risk factor not cancer so just be vigilant about your screenings.

Good Luck!!

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Feb 5, 2020 01:43PM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

Thank you! I'm sorry you're here too :(

I worry that they'll find worse things when I have the surgery. They asked if I was Ashkenazi Jewish, I guess I'd know if I was? I said no.

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Feb 5, 2020 04:03PM VDubb wrote:

Hi there, I'm newly diagnosed (as of today) with mammary carcinoma (lobular).. so newly that the entire pathology report hasn't come back yet .. waiting on the ER/PR/HER2 status.. I didn't really have any symptoms other than periodic breast pain. Like the kind you get right before your period. I just went through menopause this year, age 56. I'm trying to educate the crap out of myself but it would sure be nice to get the rest of the information I need from the report. I have set up a bilateral MRI for the day after tomorrow as Lobular can show in both breasts and doesn't always show in the form of a lump. Atleast that's what I learned today via the internet. I have an appt with a breast surgeon next Tuesday and the plan in my head is to get a bilateral mastectomy without recon.. I've been flat with dense breasts all my life.

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Feb 5, 2020 04:40PM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

I didn't have a lump. I've gained some weight with age and my breasts have gotten bigger. I used to be 32/34A and last time I bought bras, it was 37B! I think I was down to 36 last summer. I keep (kept, guess it doesn't matter now) hoping that when I finished with the fluctuating hormones, that they'd get a little smaller (I realize my increased band size is weight gain not hormones)

I have dense breasts too, I now always schedule an ultrasound with the mammogram.

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Feb 5, 2020 06:06PM - edited Feb 5, 2020 06:06PM by rtucker

Hi VDubb,

Sorry to hear about your news. I am new to this forum site also but this one is for LCIS Situ which is 0 stage cancer but a risk factor. If you have mammary lobular carcinoma there are different forums that have a variety of the things that your going through. Everyone is different with there cancer situations so I am the wrong person that could answer anything about how they treat that. Everyone's case is so varied. I wish you the best of luck and be strong.

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Feb 5, 2020 08:05PM - edited Feb 5, 2020 08:20PM by Lea7777

VDubb, You'll get better information and receive support from those in a similar situation as you are on the Invasive Lobular Cancer (ILC) forum. The letter combos can be confusing. This is the LCIS forum.

https://community.breastcancer.org/forum/95/topics...

There may be other forums of interest to you as well such as having a mastectomy or hormonal treatments. Good luck to you.

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Feb 5, 2020 08:20PM Lea7777 wrote:

"Are the 3D mammograms done with the same machine?" I believe they are not. In fact I had to go to an entirely different facility to receive them.

"I have a few extra pounds on me" Yes, don't we all!

Doesn't an MRI pump you full of dye first? Yes with a gadalinium-based contrast agent. From Mayo Clinic, 2019: "The amount of gadolinium that stays in the body is different for different gadolinium medicines. Gadolinium stays in the body more after (the dyes) Omnican or Optimark than after Eovist, Magnevist, or MultiHance. Gadolinium stays in the body the least after (the dyes) Dotarem, Gadavist, or ProHance. You can ask what dye is being used in your MRI.


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Feb 5, 2020 08:27PM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

My facility must offer them as they had a sign somewhere - it's the only reason I would have asked the tech, because the sign reminded me.

I have not heard good things about the gadalinium dye. I've spent the past 8 years detoxing my life from plastics, chemicals and my fillings. It's never enough :( Thanks for the info!

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Feb 5, 2020 09:42PM Beesie wrote:

3D mammogram machines are also used for 2D mammos and usually both are obtained and compared when a 3D mammo is done. It is however a different machine than a standard 2D mammogram machine a d not all facilities have 3D mammo equipment. .

"When used for breast cancer screening, 3D mammogram machines create 3D images and standard 2D mammogram images.". https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/3d-mammogram/about/pac-20438708

From one manufacturer of 3D mammo equipment: https://www.hologic.com/hologic-products/breast-skeletal/selenia-dimensions-mammography-system

Multiple procedure modes:

  • 2D mammography
  • Genius™ 3D Mammography™ exam
  • Low Dose Genius™ 3D Mammography™ exam
  • 3D Mammography™ only
  • 2D or 3D™ biopsy with the Affirm® breast biopsy guidance system
  • I-View™ software for contrast enhanced 2D imaging
Dx 9/15/2005 Right, 7cm+, DCIS-Mi, Stage IA, Gr 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR- ** Dx 01/16/2019 Left, 8mm, IDC, Stage IA, Gr 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR-, HER2- (FISH) ** Surgery 11/30/2005 MX Right, 03/06/2019 MX Left ** Hormonal Therapy 05/2019 Letrozole
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Feb 6, 2020 10:51AM Michi wrote:

Hi there-

Sorry you find yourself in a situation, but you will find you are in good company here. I too was in your same situation nearly 2 years ago, also diagnosed with LCIS and I will add (since you asked) that the affected right breast looked larger than the other. I’m told it was coincidence, though a coincidence which led me here. I’m only 36 so I opted for bilateral Mx with reconstruction. I too prefer more of a non toxic lifestyle and I blatantly refused the tamoxifen they wanted to put me on and opted for a mastectomy.

Mine was mostly classic LCIS though some possible and debated by various hospitals, pleomorphic. I can tell you that with PLCIS as it’s called, they will likely want to do a lumpectomy to rule out invasive and potentially discuss radiation and meds. Or, if you feel like it’s the right decision a mastectomy. Very little is known about LCIS and even less about PLCIS. I have extensively scoured medical publications and I can tell you, you will find your best resource is here and on some of these boards which have published all the relevant studies pertaining to LCIS. Know that you don’t need to make any major decisions right away- I rushed into things and I do regret not slowing down. I don’t regret my mastectomy, but I can tell you it’s something you can never undo. Make sure you are treating, if possible at a major cancer center or a reputable hospital, also do not be afraid to get multiple opinions.

Dx 4/12/2018, LCIS, Right, <1cm Surgery 5/21/2018 Prophylactic mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement
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Feb 6, 2020 04:00PM - edited Feb 6, 2020 04:02PM by HelloItsMe789

Thanks Michi (and everyone else).

She said at this time, she recommends a lumpectomy. She wants me to get an MRI prior to surgery though, to rule out anything hiding in there that the mammograms and ultrasound did not pick up. I have that scheduled for next week.

She said it was very straightforward and it's pretty much what she works on. Her basic plan of action is to remove the area marked at the biopsy (a larger area) and they send it all out to pathology to make sure there aren't any cancerous cells in there.

Then meet with an oncologist to talk about drugs. No chemo or radiation.

I prefer a non-toxic lifestyle as well, but drugs vs cancer..... She said there are a few to choose from and said some of their patients have issues with some of them, but many do not.

I think I will have a clearer picture in my head after getting the MRI results.

I have only seen one surgeon at this time.

I have spent years going round in circles with various doctors about my thyroid issues and do not want to go down that same rabbit hole with this! Though I am going to think about a visit with someone else.

Also, I've searched on PLCIS and really only find info dating back 10 or so years, is there a good long term prognosis? Was it called something else then? Or just put in with other issues?

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Feb 7, 2020 07:21AM Michi wrote:

it’s fairly newly discovered so there isn’t a ton of information on it...if you use the search bar on this website and do some digging you’ll find some previous conversations, I’ve highlighted one in particular in which Leaf (a user on this site) gives some info.

i’m glad you are getting an MRI. It is pretty rare for an MRI to miss something, mine actually picked up my extremely small area of LCIS. So If it’s done correctly with top of the line equipment it’s a great tool, along with lumpectomy, to rule out anything hiding.

This whole thing is certainly a rabbit hole, that’s the exact term I use to describe my entire experience with this. It is important to be aware of any changes you have in your body but at the same time the more you go looking for, the more you are going to find. We all have cancerous cells in our bodies. I recently watched a Ted talk in which they explained they biopsied cadavers after car accidents and found 40% of women had these types of pre-cancerous cells in their breast ages 40 and up. So I believe our condition is far more common than people realize, we just aren’t out there doing MRI’s on the general population. But I digress.. The best we can all do is take the information we have and make a decision we know will be right for us personally.

Good luck, and we are here for you


https://community.breastcancer.org/forum/95/topics/819494?page=1

Dx 4/12/2018, LCIS, Right, <1cm Surgery 5/21/2018 Prophylactic mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement
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Feb 7, 2020 09:27AM - edited Feb 7, 2020 09:29AM by ctmbsikia

Hi. Stopping in to wish you good luck with MRI and subsequent lumpectomy. After you receive the pathology from that (with hopefully no sign of any cancer cells) they will probably start you on one of the AI drugs.

In just my experience, I am much more relaxed with my right breast now being on the drug, even when there are days I want to scream from a mountain top "I want my estrogen back!!" During my diagnostic process I was in a whirlwind of having an obvious palpable lump on my left side, 2 biopsies plus a lumpectomy on a very busy right side. I was like, WTF? After 2 years now, if its any reassurance all my imagining (both MRI and 3D Mammos) have been unremarkable and normal on that side. That tells me they hopefully took it all out, and that the meds have this breast behaving as it should now.

Dx 12/14/2017, DCIS/IDC, Left, 4cm, Stage IIB, Grade 2, 1/2 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 1/16/2018, LCIS, Right Surgery 1/30/2018 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Radiation Therapy 4/10/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Hormonal Therapy 6/25/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole)
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Feb 9, 2020 04:42PM - edited Feb 9, 2020 04:43PM by Lea7777

"Also, I've searched on PLCIS and really only find info dating back 10 or so years, is there a good long term prognosis? Was it called something else then? Or just put in with other issues?"

I think that specifying between Classic, Pleomorphic, and Florid are recent classifications.


"I prefer a non-toxic lifestyle as well, but drugs vs cancer..... She said there are a few to choose from and said some of their patients have issues with some of them, but many do not."

I take one of the drugs. But since you mention you prefer a non-toxic lifestyle, know that the majority of women with atypia decline the drugs. Because the drugs are effective in reducing the odds of getting invasive cancer, oncologists encourage the drugs, but most women in our position do not choose to use them. There are probably more recent studies, and those may show more acceptance of the drugs, but here's one from 2016. The "preventive therapies" referred to in the quote are the various drugs.

Based upon data from 26 studies on uptake of preventive therapies, Smith et al. reported that uptake was 25.2% among women screened for clinical trials, but only 8.7% in the non-trial settings.

Smith, S. G. et al. Factors affecting uptake and adherence to breast cancer chemoprevention: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ann. Oncol. 27, 575–590 (2016).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26646754?dopt=...


Looks like you have a good plan, HelloItsMe789.

Thanks for all the 2 and 3 D info, Beesie!

Michi, I have not heard a figure as high as 40% of biopsied cadavers have pre-cancerous lesions, thanks for sharing that. I have heard 10%, though.


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Feb 9, 2020 05:16PM Michi wrote:

Lea

https://www.ted.com/talks/william_li_can_we_eat_to_starve_cancer/up-next?language=en#t-990675

here’s the Ted talk I watched it on, I was able to find a publication verifying the prostate cancer cells in men, yet nothing on the breast. I was into my oncologist Friday for my check up (some scar tissue causing me a minor freak out) and she didn’t have the exact figures off the top of her head but agreed it was far higher than current estimates. Though on the TED talk he states pre cancerous cells, which would obviously include all Atypia and not just LCIS. Still that’s a high figure..

Dx 4/12/2018, LCIS, Right, <1cm Surgery 5/21/2018 Prophylactic mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement
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Feb 10, 2020 06:48PM pegasus68 wrote:

I think the estimate of 40% in cadavers is a bit high, at least compared to this recent meta-analysis which suggests incidental breast cancer or precursor lesions are found in 19.5% (with the 19.5% incidence including 0.85% invasive cancer, 8.9% in situ, and 9.8% atypical hyperplasia):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=thomas+et%2C+2017%2C+breast+cancer+autopsy




Dx 2013, LCIS Surgery Prophylactic mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant
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Feb 11, 2020 01:19PM Michi wrote:

agreed it seems high, the last data I previously heard was closer to 10%, but I did read the study you posted while I was trying to verify the TED talk info.. 19.5% still blows my mind. I’m not sure calling it “rare” as dubbed by many doctors is accurate. Either way, good info and thanks for posting the latest verified stats

Dx 4/12/2018, LCIS, Right, <1cm Surgery 5/21/2018 Prophylactic mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Fat grafting, Silicone implant, Tissue expander placement
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Feb 11, 2020 03:37PM - edited Feb 11, 2020 07:57PM by pegasus68

Well, one way to look at it is this... statistically about 12.5% of women (1 out of 8) will develop breast cancer at some point in their lifetime. Is it that surprising that about 19% of women harbor an atypia that suggests they are more likely to end up as that 1 of 8? (But keeping in mind that the majority of women with atypia do not go on to develop cancer anyway.)

Edited to add: FWIW, I suspect that is part of the reason why women with more atypical foci are at higher risk, i.e. many women may have a single 'spot' of atypia but those with more foci/greater extent of atypical tissue are probably the ones more likely to end up as the 1 to progress to cancer.

Dx 2013, LCIS Surgery Prophylactic mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant
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Feb 18, 2020 08:12PM HelloItsMe789 wrote:

I am PLCIS *and* ILC

They did two more biopsies when I went for the radio implant. The first place didn't see those areas at all. The second place did the biopsies and the pathology shows ILC. I have an MRI scheduled for Friday and another surgical consult for Tuesday.

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Feb 19, 2020 10:21AM Lea7777 wrote:

HelloItsMe789, for the ILC diagnosis, the subforum of Invasive Lobular Cancer will be more helpful. That's good you went to the second place. Sorry for the diagnosis. You're taking the right steps with the MRI and surgical consult. Best wishes to you.

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