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Young Women With No Genetic Mutations Have Low Risk of Second Primary Breast Cancer

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Young Women With No Genetic Mutations Have Low Risk of Second Primary Breast Cancer

Jun 17, 2024

The risk of a young woman developing a second primary breast cancer is relatively low, unless she has a mutation linked to breast cancer. Read more…

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  • zen1028
    zen1028 Member Posts: 84
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    This is a great finding but without seeing the full article it is a little hard for me to get "happy" on this news.

    • What are the age ranges of these women?
    • Are they on any endocrine therapy protocol?
    • What were their original BC diagnosis profile? like stage, tumor size, etc.

  • moderators
    moderators Posts: 8,287
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    @zen1028 If you click through to the article, you'll see a section "About the study": https://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/mutations-second-primary-breast-cancer-risk#section-about-the-study

    And, here is a link to the abstract: https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2024.0286

    We hope this helps!

    —The Mods

  • zen1028
    zen1028 Member Posts: 84
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    Thanks. I did read thru those before I posted there. The points I listed were missing. If that was all the study says, then they only zero in the BRAC1 & BRAC2 gene mutation without taking in other factors that support why there is or there isnt any second breast cancer.

    To see the full text from JAMA, you have to create a login. I dont like creating a lot of online accounts…just my peeve 😁

  • goldensrbest
    goldensrbest Member Posts: 692
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    I guess I was one of the unlucky 2%. Dx at 34 then again at 44. No BRCA gene or family history. MBC at 64. 5 yrs stable the end of the month.

  • kaynotrealname
    kaynotrealname Member Posts: 422
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    How are you doing, goldensrbest, with your treatment? I'm so sorry this has happened to you.

  • goldensrbest
    goldensrbest Member Posts: 692
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    kaynotrealname - thank you for your comment. As I mentioned, I’m stable for almost 5 yrs on my first line of treatment. Side effects are unrelenting fatigue. I also have severe osteoarthritis which also contributes to the fatigue. I’ve always said that the most consistent thing about cancer is that it is inconsistent!

  • kaynotrealname
    kaynotrealname Member Posts: 422
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    You've definitely been battling a long time though and there is much to be said about that. I hope you are enjoying life as able.

  • moderators
    moderators Posts: 8,287
    edited June 21
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    Hi again @zen1028,

    We got some answers for you from the editorial team:

    • What are the age ranges of these women? The women in the study were all under 40. The average age as noted in the results in the abstract was 36.
    • Are they on any endocrine therapy protocol? Of 526 patients with hormone receptor–positive tumors, 390 (74%) had ET within 18 months.
    • What were their original BC diagnosis profile? like stage, tumor size, etc. The participants had stage 0–III BC diagnoses; most were stage II or III. 
      (These are formatted as number of participants, with % in parens.)

    We don't see any mention of tumor size, but here are other tumor characteristics, including grade.

    —The Mods

  • zen1028
    zen1028 Member Posts: 84
    edited June 21
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    @moderators

    Thanks but cant see these links or embedded images. Also what was the breakdown of like how many of participants had recurrence base on the grade and tumor size.

    "Of 526 patients with hormone receptor–positive tumors, 390 (74%) had ET within 18 months." a breakdown of how many of these patients had a recurrence and did not have the gene mutation or did have it?

    Sorry, just need breakdown details that does support the topic of this paper.

  • moderators
    moderators Posts: 8,287
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    @zen1028 sorry about that! Check the images again, please.