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Life expectancy for grade 1 cancer without treatment?

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13

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  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited December 2015
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    Surgical nurses are so kind. You'll be pampered

  • 614
    614 Member Posts: 398
    edited December 2015
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    Good luck with your surgery tomorrow.  I will say prayers for you.

    Just so you know, I am taking Arimidex/Anastrazole and I do not have side effects.  I recovered from my surgery immediately.  My radiation was easy too.

    Don't worry until you have to!  Your fears may not come to pass.

    I wish you the best.

  • BarredOwl
    BarredOwl Member Posts: 261
    edited December 2015
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    Sos:

    Thank you for the update. Good luck tomorrow!! 🍀

    BarredOwl


  • april485
    april485 Member Posts: 1,983
    edited December 2015
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    Best of luck at kicking that BC to the CURB!

    ThumbsUp

  • etnasgrl
    etnasgrl Member Posts: 185
    edited December 2015
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    I'm SO glad that you decided to go ahead with the lumpectomy!!!
    Many prayers going out to you for a smooth surgery! ((((Hugs))))

  • meow13
    meow13 Member Posts: 1,363
    edited December 2015
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    I had mastectomy and DIEP and it was easy recovery not much discomfort. I was really relieved to have my tumors out.

  • loral
    loral Member Posts: 818
    edited December 2015
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  • glennie19
    glennie19 Member Posts: 4,831
    edited December 2015
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    sos: glad to hear that you had surgery. Hope you are having an easy recovery. Please keep us posted when you can.

  • sos1125
    sos1125 Member Posts: 6
    edited December 2015
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    Thanks so much for all the prayers and good wishes, I truly appreciate it. Surgery day was long, but came through it all just fine and am on the mend. Anxiously awaiting pathology results, my surgeon does "cavity shave margins" so I think my re-excision chances are only around 10%. Fingers crossed for clear margins, still low grade and no nodes involved. On to radiation and medical oncology research.

    Marijen, I also found that the vast majority of the surgical nurses were exceptionally kind and did everything possible to minimize discomfort. Was really impressed by the nursing staff.

    Thanks again.

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,747
    edited December 2015
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    So happy that things went well. My experience was also that the nurses and aides were very caring and compassionate. Wishing you a swift recovery

  • divinemrsm
    divinemrsm Member Posts: 6,003
    edited December 2015
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    sos, thanks for the update on how things went so far and I hope the pathology reads clear margins. Glad the surgery went well.I also hope you are very good to yourself during this process, take it easy and pace yourself. You are worth all the treatment and even if it slows you down for a period of time, sort of like a detour through life, you'll be surprised how fast time really goes and how soon you'll be back on track and moving full speed ahead. God bless

  • patoo
    patoo Member Posts: 5,243
    edited December 2015
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    YAY sos! Here's (imagine me raising cocktail glass) to a clean path report and speedy recovery.

  • eggroll
    eggroll Member Posts: 117
    edited December 2015
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    We have a similar diagnosis, and I went through the same thought process you did. I'm 50, my kids are 19 and 21, oldest is already married. I most recently wondered if I just walked away after the lumpectomy and took my chances how that would work out and if it might be the best thing to do? You may be comfortable not going through treatment yourself, but is that what you would want for your kids? Because that's going to be their example. My mom died of untreated lung cancer. She would never listen to doctors, she wanted to tell them what to do. I have a letter I found from one doctor telling her she is not to ever come to his clinic again. So that's my role model, and I have to really battle to be a compliant patient. I also met a woman who was shunning treatment and her 20-year-old daughter kept breaking down in sobs, and I thought, "This could go on for years, this girl in despair that her mother is dying because she won't let her doctors treat her." Even if her mother was going to lose her battle in the end, it makes a difference whether we are at least is trying to fight. Also, my kids have lost both sets of grandparents, their dad has some kind muscular dystrophy and now I have breast cancer. My 21-year-old let it drop the other day he doesn't expect to live a long life. Don't settle for a shorter life on purpose, it's more important than you think.

  • WinningSoFar
    WinningSoFar Member Posts: 126
    edited December 2015
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    Dear eggroll,

    Your post is exceptional. It is true that as moms we set our kids and grandkids an example of how to live and how to die. There comes a time in every life when we are no longer happily living, but we're in the dying process, but should we hurry that day along? I think not. As long as we're alive and have good quality of life, we need to work to keep it as best we can. That's an example worth setting.

  • divinemrsm
    divinemrsm Member Posts: 6,003
    edited December 2015
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    egg roll, great post. Our experiences often shape our decisions. In my case, it was something that happened the opposite of what perhaps you dealt with, that made me not blink one eyelash about having chemo, radiation and surgery. In fact, I kept asking, when do I start chemo?


    And this is my story: around 1978, my 18 year old brother was diagnosed with terminal testicular cancer. It had started in the testes, then traveled to his stomach and throat. He was given one year to live. I was 20 at the time. He had aggressive treatment, surgery to remove as much as they could, however, cancer was wrapped around some of the internal organs and too near the vocal chords, so they couldn't get all of it. Then he had chemotherapy which made him sick sick sick throwing up, lying on the couch every day. He also had radiation.

    Brother is still around, in his 50s. When people say, oh, you're in remission, he says, "remission? No, cured!" Yes, I believe in miracles.

    These days, there are medicines to help alleviate the nausea and other issues with chemo. I never threw up once. It was rough at times but I never even considered it a hardship. I wanted to kill the cancer and live. People who automatically say no to chemo and radiation are not being open minded and think they already know everything about it and how they will react to it. They listen to horror stories when there are many more success stories. Yes, it will be a detour in your life, but one worth taking.
  • Melclarity
    Melclarity Member Posts: 387
    edited December 2015
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    Hi Sos,

    I've just read through the thread, and I am so happy you decided on the surgery. I have to say TheDivinemr had some very spot on points. I was diagnosed in 2011 with DCIS, Unfortunately I had a recurrence in the same spot in June this year. So in 4yrs I'd jumped from DCIS to Stage 3 aggressive. It is unpredictable and you are super early to be well ahead of the game, you'll kick this and before you know it be back into your life.

    One thing that stuck out, is I too felt like you in the beginning, I did not want to do any of it. I realized very quickly as I am a single parent of 2 teenage kids, that for me I wanted to show them, that life can be cruel and incredibly hard, I wanted to show them that no matter what happens, don't ever stop getting back up and fighting. My kids are now 16 and 18yo, and they've travelled the entire journey with me, we are super tight and I have no regrets through any treatment, my prognosis is good. This was something personal for me about sharing my resilience in life and my kids now approach life through challenging times with that same resilience. But most importantly was I've done this for me..

    Sending positive vibes for great results! and a quick recovery! I have a feeling you are going to do even better than you ever imagined you could with it all.

    PS- I had 0 side effects on Tamoxifen for 4yrs. :)

    Big hugs!

  • PatRN10
    PatRN10 Member Posts: 110
    edited December 2015
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    SOS, I just came across your thread. So glad you had surgery. Due to oncotype and lower ER %, I decided to be very aggressive with my grade one treatment. Just finished chemo with no regrets! I hope you are getting an Oncotype test.

    Pat

  • divinemrsm
    divinemrsm Member Posts: 6,003
    edited December 2015
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    Mel, yes, even tho we'd like to shield our kids from the trials of life, it is not really possible as the trials are apart of life. As parents, we can offer a type of blueprint for our kids to follow on how to deal with the rough stuff through our own actions on how we deal with our own trials and tribulations. My son is now a college graduate and on his own and I've told him, 'I don't worry about you being successful. I know you will be. What I hope I have instilled in you is the ability to persevere when things get rough. It is easy to be successful when things are going good but what is important is how you deal with the curves life can throw at you.'

    It is great for your kids to see that resiliency in you.


  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,747
    edited December 2015
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    " What I hope I have instilled in you is the ability to persevere when things get rough. It is easy to be successful when things are going good but what is important is how you deal with the curves life can throw at you.' "

    That is one of the greatest gifts we can give our children. Besides academics, it's also something I try to cultivate in my students. Thanks, Mrs. M

  • labelle
    labelle Member Posts: 134
    edited December 2015
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    We are products of our experiences. My mother was diagnosed w BC in 2002. She had chemo (she was miserable) followed by a lumpectomy, SNB and RADS. Because she had several positive nodes she also underwent the removal of all nodes on that side. After which she was very miserable, her breast became and stayed rock hard and she developed a severe case of lymphadema making her mostly unable to use her left arm. She started on tamoxifen which made her more miserable and while taking it progressed to stage IV.

    She died within 5 years of her initial diagnosis, within months of being diagnosed with stage IV (more nasty chemo, she was in the middle of another round when she died) even though she did exactly what her doctors told her and even though her quality of life was never the same. I felt I lost my mother long before she actually died. Her disease and treatments changed her so much, physically, mentally and emotionally.

    So when it was my turn, I didn't want that. I wanted to continue to really be here for my husband and kids (17 to 29 but still kids, LOL) not so crippled by my treatments that I wouldn't be the same person but someone unable to enjoy life. So I questioned everything, have only had treatments reluctantly. I had a lumpectomy and SNB w whole breast radiation (skipped the supraclavical area) and have thus far declined anti-hormonals (chemo was not suggested) although I do still consider having an oophorectomy from time to time but haven't done it yet. My choice to decline hormonals isn't one a lot of us make, it may or may not be a good choice in the long run (we will never know, even if I have a recurrence, anti-hormonals only stop half of expected recurrences so taking it sometimes makes no difference anyway) but I feel really, really good these days.

    My mother's experience and the failure of her aggressive treatment to do much of anything but make her feel bad has certainly played a role in my decision to do pretty minimal treatment. However, the lack of stats and studies done with tubular breast cancer, an indolent, lazy type cancer (per my OC and every thing I have found about it-there is little) also played a role in my decisions. With a different kind of BC I may have made different, more aggressive treatment choices despite my mother's experience. And sometimes I tend to agree with the often expressed on here sentiment that it is all a crapshoot anyway, so I"m doing only the things that make me feel good: healthy diet, exercise, avoiding stress, etc. The decisions I've made about my treatment have all been agonizing for me. I sometimes envy those who can just do what the doctors advise without the internal warfare I experience.

  • patoo
    patoo Member Posts: 5,243
    edited December 2015
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    Labelle, for sure it is a crapshoot as we just don't know and can't predict. That is why everyone always (or those who are not judgmental) say it has to come from what your heart tells you is right for you. Don't envy, just live! Hug

  • Melclarity
    Melclarity Member Posts: 387
    edited December 2015
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    Labelle, thanks for sharing your story, I totally understand you makes complete sense. It's so super unpredictable, I'm in a recurrence after 4yrs and I took tamoxifen so absolutely no way of knowing where you sit I was in a minority percentage. My mum had BC at 40, mastectomy no treatment regretted having it done but....she lived another 26yrs free was wonderful. I admit I've been in the system 9yrs and ahead of it, definitely been my saving grace and I know gosh the earlier its caught the more successful. I've just finished chemo and my oncologist wants me to think about a mastectomy for peace of mind....I haven't made a decision.


    You have every right to do what you want to do, 100% we all make different choices that we feel are right for ourselves, so trust you and your gut always it will never steer you wrong. We are all unique and magnificent women.

  • Melclarity
    Melclarity Member Posts: 387
    edited December 2015
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    The divinemr, you are so right, the mum in me at first wanted to shield and protect my kids, but hen I realized goodness that's not helping them. They really are resilient that was such an important lesson for me to impart. My daughter 18 just finished her graduating year of secondary school and we never thought she'd get through it having been diagnosed with depression late 2014, it's been super tough then my BC returned June, Inspite of both these things she too fought her fight this year, and did well couldn't be prouder. She now knows no matter the challenge she too can rise to it.

  • meow13
    meow13 Member Posts: 1,363
    edited December 2015
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    sos you are going to be ok. I know you will be there for your daughter.

  • Carmelita1951
    Carmelita1951 Member Posts: 6
    edited February 2018
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    Hi.

    I’m 66 Years old and also stage1

    I love life and love my family and pets

    I got the cancer remove ambulatory

    Go home same day, the next day I walk my dogs.

    I won’t Denide the future treatment makes

    Me a little nervous but I’ll prefer go through and perhaps live another 15 Years .

    Please think of your love ones

  • Carmelita1951
    Carmelita1951 Member Posts: 6
    edited February 2018
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    Hi.

    I’m getting more relax , I’m going for second opinion, and ready for treatment

    I have so much to live, my husband my good man messy but my love, my our son

    My dogs , my big garden..

    I’m ready for treatment, get a wig, wear a nice scarf,

    I was freaked out but thinking about my love ones, better be po

  • lola12
    lola12 Member Posts: 16
    edited February 2018
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    For your 8 year old, do everything. Don't question it like you have a choice, do it all, and never regret. I am on my 8th year of hormonals, my joints ache, I get tired, but I saw my daughter graduate from high school and college and I am going to keep taking my tamoxifen so I am there to see her wedding too.

  • meow13
    meow13 Member Posts: 1,363
    edited February 2018
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    If you do decide to take anti hormone medication tamoxifen please be very cautious it can cause uterine cancer my poor SIL died from it. Her situation was oncodx score of 14 idc, er+ and pr+ stage 1 no nodes. Her outlook was really pretty good she started tamoxifen and she noticed a lump in her groin area. The doctor did not listen to her or react soon enough. By the time they did the biopsy it was too late.

  • edwards750
    edwards750 Member Posts: 1,568
    edited February 2018
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    OMG Meow that’s horrible.

  • meow13
    meow13 Member Posts: 1,363
    edited February 2018
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    edwards, I know, I think because it is a rare side effect but it can happen. We still can't believe it.