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Silver Water

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vampeyes
vampeyes Member Posts: 523

Anyone heard of Silver Water helping with the recurrence or prevention of cancer? Recently a co-worker mentioned his friend's family was full of breast cancer with the exception of her mom who has been taking Silver Water for years. Just wondering if anyone has tried it or heard good things it can do for you or is it toxic?

Thanks to all,

xxx

Comments

  • simonerc
    simonerc Member Posts: 154
    edited October 2019
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    If this family has a pathogenic gene mutation, perhaps the mother does not. MelissaDallas posted a great article from Mayo Clinic. Correlation is different than causation.


  • melissadallas
    melissadallas Member Posts: 929
    edited October 2019
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    And if you have ever seen a picture of someone who has permanently turned blue from taking colloidal silver I will tell you that you really, really don't want that.

  • vampeyes
    vampeyes Member Posts: 523
    edited October 2019
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    Thanks for the link and input. I don't want to turn blue either, but they tried to tell me with such a small amount it wouldn't happen. xxx

  • bluepearl
    bluepearl Member Posts: 133
    edited November 2019
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    Silver is a heavy metal and settles in your body. Even small amounts over time will add up. Like small amounts of lead. And they still call THAT lead poisoning. There is no evidence that it works either,

  • sbelizabeth
    sbelizabeth Member Posts: 956
    edited November 2019
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    Image result for blue man

  • joyfuldr
    joyfuldr Member Posts: 1
    edited February 2022
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    Hello Melissadallas


    Did you end up taking colloidal silver because i have heard positive results from users, and no one turned blue yet, some have been taking it for years. I just ordered my first bottle and i am kinda scared taking it!

  • alicebastable
    alicebastable Member Posts: 1,945
    edited February 2022
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    Joyfuldr, please read this link before putting that in your body. It is NOT meant for human consumption.

    https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/colloidal-silver

  • nopink2019
    nopink2019 Member Posts: 384
    edited February 2022
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    Blue people of KY is genetic. Using collodial silver internally or as cream does similar thing. Not good for you.

    https://health.howstuffworks.com/human-body/systems/circulatory/blue-people-kentucky.htm

  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    This paper sounds supportive.


  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    There is a paper by UT Southwestern doctors who documented a case of a patient they sent home to die after chemo and radiation failed to stop the cancer, head and neck I believe, but the patient started making his own silver water and 3 months later he was cancer free. He had metastases, liver and lung. They sent this man home to hospice! To their credit his doctors documented and published his case.

    I can't get the link to an abstract to work but it is easy to get search results with above details. Only abstracts are available or pay to get the paper.

    Someone else here linked to a paper that showed TNBC cells are very vulnerable to silver nanoparticles. So there is supportive legitimate science.

  • parakeetsrule
    parakeetsrule Member Posts: 605
    edited February 2022
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    A random treatment that worked on ONE person is not supportive legitimate science. Publishing his case is the scientific equivalent of an anecdote. It cannot be used as evidence for widespread use of the treatment, or anyone else attempting it. Papers like that are published all the time to document medical oddities. Did the man have breast cancer? If not, that's even more reason to not ingest toxic material.

    And a paper showing TNBC cells are vulnerable to silver nanoparticles doesn't mean that a human drinking silver water is going to cure their cancer. Most tests like that are done in labs with cells or animals, not with live human subjects.
  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    This compilation includes the silver nanoparticle head and neck cancer case.


  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    Edited to add link below. Case # 6 is the one that cites silver nanoparticles.

    "10 Cases of Complete Remission from Advanced Cancers After Using Supplements or Repurposed Drugs"

    which lists the silver nanoparticles case documented by doctors at UT Southwestern, which is a major cancer center in Texas.

    Interestingly other cases cited in this article are documented from doctors at the Mayo and MD Anderson.

    https://www.cancertreatmentsresearch.com/10-cases-of-complete-remission-from-stage-4-cancers-after-using-supplements-or-repurposed-drugs/

  • parakeetsrule
    parakeetsrule Member Posts: 605
    edited February 2022
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    If it's a valid paper it will be available somewhere, even if the link you had isn't working. I couldn't even find it on the UT website though.

    But again, this is anecdotal evidence in individual case reports. It's not research testing the efficacy of the medicine, and it can't be used to justify using the same supplements in other random people. Especially toxic ones like colloidal silver.

  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    This is from the article I cited above.

    Edited to add. Because so many sceptics insist ingesting any amount of silver nanoparticles will turn skin blue I would like to point out the abstract, linked at the bottom, states, "No toxicities were observed and he had complete radiographic resolution of his cancer." No mention of argyria, the blue skin condition.


    Case 6: Complete Remission of Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer after Drinking Silver Nanoparticles Solution

    A case report by oncologists and scientists from Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, Dallas, Texas; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas.

    This case report describes a 78-year old male diagnosed with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer. Although he has received all the conventional treatment options including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, his cancer continue to evolve and metastasise at different locations. After pulmonary and hepatic
    metastases have appeared, he was recommended to transition to hospice as he was found to be a poor candidate for salvage therapy given his decline in functional capacity and multiple recurrences despite aggressive anticancer therapy.

    After the diagnosis of metastatic disease, the patient began to manufacture and consume an AgNP solution. 3 months after pre-hospice imaging and after starting to ingest AgNP solution, showed complete disappearance of all pulmonary and liver metastases as well as of previously seen nodes in the neck (figure below). This recovery and complete resolution of cancer at all sites persisted for 36 months and is ongoing.

    Reference: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/hed.25492

  • parakeetsrule
    parakeetsrule Member Posts: 605
    edited February 2022
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    Okay? That's one person, and not breast cancer.

  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    These two papers may interest some. The first made the observation colloidal silver was widely used prior to 1938, before antibiotics were developed.

    Now before anyone feels compelled to point out these are not large scale trials,, I would point out the science has to start somewhere. Those large scale trials require mega amounts of money, so it's no wonder this substance hasn't gone far.



    Antitumor activity of colloidal silver on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Moisés A Franco-Molina, Edgar Mendoza-Gamboa, [...], and Cristina Rodríguez-Padilla

    Additional article information

    Abstract

    Background

    Colloidal silver has been used as an antimicrobial and disinfectant agent. However, there is scarce information on its antitumor potential. The aim of this study was to determine if colloidal silver had cytotoxic effects on MCF-7 breast cancer cells and its mechanism of cell death.

    Methods

    MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with colloidal silver (ranged from 1.75 to 17.5 ng/mL) for 5 h at 37°C and 5% CO2 atmosphere. Cell Viability was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and the mechanism of cell death through detection of mono-oligonucleosomes using an ELISA kit and TUNEL assay. The production of NO, LDH, and Gpx, SOD, CAT, and Total antioxidant activities were evaluated by colorimetric assays.

    Results

    Colloidal silver had dose-dependent cytotoxic effect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells through induction of apoptosis, shown an LD50 (3.5 ng/mL) and LD100 (14 ng/mL) (*P < 0.05), significantly decreased LDH (*P < 0.05) and significantly increased SOD (*P < 0.05) activities. However, the NO production, and Gpx, CAT, and Total antioxidant activities were not affected in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. PBMC were not altered by colloidal silver.

    Conclusions

    The present results showed that colloidal silver might be a potential alternative agent for human breast cancer therapy.

    Background

    Prior to 1938, colloidal silver was widely used to prevent or treat numerous diseases. Its use decreased with the development of antibiotics, such as penicillin and sulfanilamide [1]....


    Or this one.


    Differential cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects of silver nanoparticles on triple-negative breast cancer and non-triple-negative breast cells

    Authors Swanner J, Mims J, Carroll D, Akman S, Furdui C, Torti S, Singh R

    Received 5 January 2015

    Accepted for publication 2 March 2015

    Published 11 June 2015 Volume 2015:10(1) Pages 3937—3953

    DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S80349

    Checked for plagiarism Yes

    Review by Single anonymous peer review

    Peer reviewer comments 4

    Editor who approved publication: Dr Thomas J Webster

    Article has an altmetric score of 5Download Article [PDF]

    Jessica Swanner,1 Jade Mims,2 David L Carroll,3,4 Steven A Akman,5 Cristina M Furdui,2 Suzy V Torti,6 Ravi N Singh1,7

    1Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Molecular Medicine, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 3Center for Nanoscale and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 4Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 5Roper St Francis Cancer Care, Charleston, SC, USA; 6Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, CT, USA; 7Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA

    Abstract: Identification of differential sensitivity of cancer cells as compared to normal cells has the potential to reveal a therapeutic window for the use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a therapeutic agent for cancer therapy. Exposure to AgNPs is known to cause dose-dependent toxicities, including induction of oxidative stress and DNA damage, which can lead to cell death. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtypes are more vulnerable to agents that cause oxidative stress and DNA damage than are other breast cancer subtypes. We hypothesized that TNBC may be susceptible to AgNP cytotoxicity, a potential vulnerability that could be exploited for the development of new therapeutic agents. We show that AgNPs are highly cytotoxic toward TNBC cells at doses that have little effect on nontumorigenic breast cells or cells derived from liver, kidney, and monocyte lineages. AgNPs induced more DNA and oxidative damage in TNBC cells than in other breast cells. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that AgNPs reduce TNBC growth and improve radiation therapy. These studies show that unmodified AgNPs act as a self-therapeutic agent with a combination of selective cytotoxicity and radiation dose-enhancement effects in TNBC at doses that are nontoxic to noncancerous breast and other cells.

    Keywords: DNA damage, radiation sensitizer, glutathione, redox

  • parakeetsrule
    parakeetsrule Member Posts: 605
    edited February 2022
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    True, the science has to start somewhere. But this thread began with someone asking about taking silver water as a breast cancer treatment NOW, and there is no evidence whatsoever that it will work. There is far more evidence showing that it's dangerous and toxic.

    I'm unfollowing this thread now. Y'all can just believe what you want regardless of science and evidence.

  • olma61
    olma61 Member Posts: 1,025
    edited February 2022
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    yes silver nitrate was used as an anti bacterial. Do antibiotics kill cancer

  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    Even though this is unrelated to this thread and prior posts. Here is a paper on the topic of an antibiotic as a possible anti-cancer treatment. There are more papers for those who want to research. Doxycycline is an antibiotic and cancer stem cells spread cancer.


    Doxycycline, an Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Effectively Reduces Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Clinical Pilot Study

    Cristian Scatena, Manuela Roncella, [...], and Antonio Giuseppe Naccarato

    Additional article information

    Associated Data

    Supplementary Materials

    Abstract

    Background and objectives: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been implicated in tumor initiation, recurrence, metastatic spread and poor survival in multiple tumor types, breast cancers included. CSCs selectively overexpress key mitochondrial-related proteins and inhibition of mitochondrial function may represent a new potential approach for the eradication of CSCs. Because mitochondria evolved from bacteria, many classes of FDA-approved antibiotics, including doxycycline, actually target mitochondria. Our clinical pilot study aimed to determine whether short-term pre-operative treatment with oral doxycycline results in reduction of CSCs in early breast cancer patients.

    Methods: Doxycycline was administered orally for 14 days before surgery for a daily dose of 200 mg. Immuno-histochemical analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples from 15 patients, of which 9 were treated with doxycycline and 6 were controls (no treatment), was performed with known biomarkers of “stemness" (CD44, ALDH1), mitochondria (TOMM20), cell proliferation (Ki67, p27), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and neo-angiogenesis (CD31). For each patient, the analysis was performed both on pre-operative specimens (core-biopsies) and surgical specimens. Changes from baseline to post-treatment were assessed with MedCalc 12 (unpaired t-test) and ANOVA.

    Results: Post-doxycycline tumor samples demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in the stemness marker CD44 (p-value < 0.005), when compared to pre-doxycycline tumor samples. More specifically, CD44 levels were reduced between 17.65 and 66.67%, in 8 out of 9 patients treated with doxycycline. In contrast, only one patient showed a rise in CD44, by 15%. Overall, this represents a positive response rate of nearly 90%. Similar results were also obtained with ALDH1, another marker of stemness. In contrast, markers of mitochondria, proliferation, apoptosis, and neo-angiogenesis, were all similar between the two groups.

    Conclusions: Quantitative decreases in CD44 and ALDH1 expression are consistent with pre-clinical experiments and suggest that doxycycline can selectively eradicate CSCs in breast cancer patients in vivo. Future studies (with larger numbers of patients) will be conducted to validate these promising pilot studies.








  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,153
    edited February 2022
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    Right on Parakeets & Olma!!!

  • olma61
    olma61 Member Posts: 1,025
    edited February 2022
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    Cocogal, my view is, I was willing to risk cardiac problems and all the other side effects of my conventional treatment because there was overwhelming evidence that the benefits would outweigh the risk.

    I would not be willing to go around looking like that fella above (blue gray skin) based on one vrey small study that showed a possible benefit. And I am stage IV, but I still need strong evidence.

    I did not like being bald with no eyebrows, I am sure I would not like being blue, but I would tolerate it if strong evidence showed it could eliminate my cancer.


    Minus two 👋🏼 🤝 😃😃

  • Cocogal
    Cocogal Member Posts: 25
    edited February 2022
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    For those interested in silver nanoparticles here is link to a paper by scientists who tested them against cancer by comparing and combining them with chemotherapy agents. There is a graph showing them near the end of the paper.

    https://kundoc.com/pdf-silver-nanoparticles-modulate-abc-transporter-activity-and-enhance-chemotherapy-.html