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30 years old large lump found

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Smichaels11
Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
edited June 2020 in Not Diagnosed But Worried

Hello, I am hoping for some reassurance. A few days ago I felt a large lump in my left breast on the upper outer quadrant towards my armpit. Its huge - probably 2 inches long and submarine shaped. It does not hurt and does not move. I had an appointment with my gyno yesterday and she asked questions about breastfeeding, caffeine, and salt intake. No, no, and no were my answers. I'm not even sure how long it's been there as I dont self examine as much as I should. She said not to worry but ordered an ASAP diagnostic mammogram. Becasue of my age, 30, I have never had a mammogram before. The soonest they can see me is 2 days from now thanks to Covid.

I have no history of BC in my family that I know of, but I don't know a whole lot about my family TBH.

Of course I keep Googling everything and all signs are pointing to breast cancer. I have a 5 year old... I am just not ready for what this could be. Even the statistics for someone my age is really scary. Looking for reassurance.

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  • melissadallas
    melissadallas Member Posts: 929
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    Smichaels11, I’ll bet even more Google signs are pointing to benign, but you aren’t seeing them. Try not to get ahead of yourself. Most breast lumps are benign, and anything with even a 3% estimated chance of being cancer on mammogram/ultrasound are recommended for biopsy. Of those biopsies, 70%-80% are benign. Your age is also on your side. Additionally, women are frequently wrong as to what they feel is “immoveable” as to how a doctor sees it. Try not to make yourself sick over something that very well may turn out to be no big deal.Stressing won’t change anything and if it should turn out to be cancer you will deal with that too. Way too early at this point to panic

  • moderators
    moderators Posts: 8,089
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    Dear Smichaels11,

    We are sorry that this lump and its accompanying worry have brought you here. We are glad that you reached our for reassurance. We hope that you are feeling some in response to MelissaDallas's post. We agree that the internet will lead you to breast cancer and more worry than is necessary. You are taking the appropriate steps and hopefully will get some more information in a few days. Keep us posted.

    The Mods

  • jelloelloello
    jelloelloello Member Posts: 83
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    Just a friendly note of support! I know it's impossible not to worry so I won't even say that, but maybe take a break from Googling things right now because all that info that turns out to be not specific to your individual situation will just lead you down some confusing paths. Once I had my appointment set, that was the best thing I did-- stopped looking stuff up and just waited to talk with my doctor and do the exams. Hang in there, friend! Best of luck to you. Feel free to come back to the forum whenever needed- you'll find great people here who can share in your worries, confusion, joy and relief!

  • Smichaels11
    Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
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    Thank thank you so much for the reassurance. The statistics you provided are helpful, but of course my mind is just racing. The more I research the more scared I get. I am hoping to be able to at least get some sleep tonight. I took a few days off work since I cant seem to focus on anything. Ugh and I'm sure even after this diagnostic mammogram there were be even more waiting if I need a biopsy.

  • beesie.is.out-of-office
    beesie.is.out-of-office Member Posts: 1,435
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    Could this lump be breast cancer? Yes? Is it likely to be? No.

    At your age, cysts and fibroadenomas are common. Both can form into significant lumps, and both are benign and harmless. I had a couple of fibroadenomas when I was younger, and in my 30s and 40s (and beyond), more cysts than I can remember.

    On the other hand, at your age, breast cancer is very uncommon:

    image

    Good luck, and let us know how it goes.

  • Amanda2692
    Amanda2692 Member Posts: 4
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    I have the EXACT same lump in the same place I describe it as a mango pit LoL. I am 33, breastfeeding and it has been there for weeks on end at this point. Zero pain with it. I have a few other things going on as well with my breast though. I have had several ultrasounds, a mammogram (not the most accurate while breastfeeding though) and have seen an oncologist and breast surgeon on multiple occasions since January who are in agreement that it is benign. It is hard to relax (trust me) but DON'T GOOGLE!

  • Smichaels11
    Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
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    Just wanted to give an update. Had a diagnostic mammogram and ultrasound today. The doctor recommended a biopsy because she doesn't have a good feeling about it. She basically ruled out fibroadenoma and cyst. So I go back on Monday for a biopsy. I'm not ready to join this club.

  • lb13
    lb13 Member Posts: 48
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    @Smichaels11 - I am sorry you are here, and I am sorry they are sending you for a biopsy. I understand your feelings, as I never wanted to join this club either. However, I have found this group to be a calming force when my mind is going to all of the dark places. This site has a wealth of information, and seems to be very trusted by many docs. While I cannot say much to calm you, because the beginning of the process with all of the waiting and wondering felt like the worst part for me - I will say to try to keep a positive attitude and not worry about what you don't know. We are all here to be your shoulders to lean on. I will say prayers for good news. :)

  • Each_day_2018
    Each_day_2018 Member Posts: 66
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    I was 31 when I was diagnosed in 2018. Even if you get bad news, the treatments that are available now are so advanced as compared to, say, 20 years ago. Just take it one day at a time...Good luck at your biopsy and let us know! Fingers crossed it's nothing!

  • Smichaels11
    Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
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    Thank you for sharing. I had my biopsy this morning and just seeing that damn mass again during the ultrasound was the hardest thing. I have been an emotional mess and don't know how to stop the thoughts. I can't even watch tv or movies because there is always someone, usually a mother, who dies of breast cancer. I haven't eaten or slept in over a week and it's taking a toll. My son has been glued to me and it's hard to fight the nonstop feeling of wanting to cry. I have never been this low in my life.

  • elainetherese
    elainetherese Member Posts: 1,627
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    Smichaels,

    Have you talked to a medical professional about your lack of appetite and sleep? My oncologist gave me some anti-anxiety meds (Ativan and Xanax) to help me sleep at night when I couldn't. I just had a small supply, and never became reliant on them. I also opted to take an anti-depressant (Celexa) to cope with the mood swings produced by hormonal therapy (Aromasin). There's no shame in doing what you need to do to get through life. For many of us, "Better living through chemistry" is a mantra.

    However, if you're not interested in meds, you should consider counseling or talking to someone who is understanding and comforting. Continue to vent here if you feel like it! We get it. ((Hugs))

  • upstate38
    upstate38 Member Posts: 3
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    Hello,

    I'm so sorry that you're dealing with this. The unknown and waiting is very difficult. I just wanted to offer support and encouragement during this time. Did the radiologist say anything else or let you know when you would get results? I have a son that is 6 and was in the middle of the waiting game/biopsy a few months ago. I cried a lot and completely lost my appetite. There are so many caring people on this site. We are here for you. I know it's impossible, but please try to focus on anything else. I spent a lot of time outside playing with my son. That was the only thing that would help me a little bit. Sending you lots of hugs from SC. Please keep us updated and feel free to message me if you need anything.

  • Smichaels11
    Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
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    Thank you, I appreciate you reaching out. She said results should be in tomorrow, Wed at the latest. It's going to be via phone so I am dreading that call for sure. There is a slim chance this could be an abnormal fibroadenoma so I am just hoping and praying.

  • upstate38
    upstate38 Member Posts: 3
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    I will be praying for you tonight. Hang in there..:)

  • maryjv
    maryjv Member Posts: 269
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    Keeping you in my thoughts and prayers...I went through the same feelings as you during the unknown, once I was diagnosed and knew the specifics and treatment plan I was ready to fight! I know it’s hard to tell you to try and forget about it because it consumes your every thought but hold fast to the very real possibility of something benign!!! 🙏

  • LiveLoveLaugh2020
    LiveLoveLaugh2020 Member Posts: 173
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    Smichaels sending positive vibes and prayers. Hope you get benign results! 🙏

  • alicebastable
    alicebastable Member Posts: 1,945
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    Smichaels, do try to do something fun and distracting with your son. It will help both of you. Now that things are opening up, you can go to parks and take him on walks that can be visual scavenger hunts, or find other activities not too close to other people.

  • Smichaels11
    Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
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    My worst fear came true. I received the call. Invasive ductal carcinoma poorly differentiated. I can't breathe. I can't believe this. They don't know the stage yet. They said an oncologist would call me soon.

  • LiveLoveLaugh2020
    LiveLoveLaugh2020 Member Posts: 173
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    I’m so sorry 😢

    We are all here for you. You will get through this. Wishing you the best going forward. ❤️

  • elainetherese
    elainetherese Member Posts: 1,627
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    The diagnosis is scary but remember that breast cancer is very treatable. I also had a large lump that was poorly-differentiated and I'm still here, almost six years later. Be kind to yourself. Keep busy. ((Hugs))

  • Each_day_2018
    Each_day_2018 Member Posts: 66
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    Smichaels = thank you for the update. That is rough news to take in and is very overwhelming. Try to take it one day at a time. Once you have a treatment plan in place, it will feel like you are more in control. Check out some of the other forum topics. Depending on your treatment, there's a place for everything from surgery to chemo to radiation, etc. Use those boards to ask questions and learn more. You'll get through this!

  • upstate38
    upstate38 Member Posts: 3
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    I'm so sorry to hear this. Please know that we're all here for you.

  • buttonsmachine
    buttonsmachine Member Posts: 339
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    Smichaels, I'm so sorry you got this news. I was devastated when I was diagnosed at age 32. It's a huge blow to those of us who are just getting started in our adult lives. I cried for days, weeks, I don't even know how long. I'm thinking of you, and know that you're not alone. Also, you will find that you are stronger than you think, even though it doesn't feel like it right now. It will get better.

  • salamandra
    salamandra Member Posts: 736
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    Smichaels,

    I'm sorry to hear that update :( But I have so much hope for you that you will get through this.

    For me, I found that my first meeting with my surgical oncologist was the moment I felt I could exhale. It was my gynecologist (who ordered the diagnostic mammogram for me) who first went over my results with me, and she did not have the knowledge or expertise or experience to advise me or relieve my worries (absolutely no aspersion on her, she's a great doctor, it's just not her field).

    I second the recommendation to get something to take the edge off of the anxiety. Try to focus on getting through the days and making some nice memories with your son. One of the most helpful (and true) pieces of advice I got was that humans are much better at remembering what we did than how we felt. Even if you feel like a complete mess, you might still be able to do some things that will be nice memories for you.

    I distinctly remember thinking that as bad as I felt as I waited for that appointment, it could turn out to only get worse if my stage turned out to 4/metastatic. First, you should know (I didn't) that this is quite unlikely. But it turns out that even for women who are stage 4 de novo, the first meeting with an oncologist and creating a plan of action creates real relief. So don't think about how will you bear this for months/years, focus on getting through the time until your appointment.

    In some ways, you're ahead of the game. You're already here on these boards, for one thing! If you don't already have a therapist/social worker, I can recommend this organization: Sharsheret. They connected me to a social worker who listened as I stressed, looked up information for me about practical stuff (health providers who take my insurance, questions about health things I didn't feel like i could research for myself), was incredibly supportive, and who followed up and checked in with me regularly. They are a Jewish organization but they serve everybody, with some focus on younger people like you. I can't tell you how useful it was to feel like I had a professional in my corner, just for me, especially in the early times when I was adjusting and still didn't know or was getting to know my doctors. They can also connect you to other women who went through a similar diagnosis to you.

  • beesie.is.out-of-office
    beesie.is.out-of-office Member Posts: 1,435
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    Smichaels, I am so sorry to hear about your diagnosis. It's devastating news for anyone to hear; at your age, and with a young child, I can only imagine how scary it is.

    Be good to yourself and take care of yourself. Some of the best advice I ever read on this site was someone saying that even when you are scared and overwhelmed and not ready for any of it, all you have to do is show up. Take one step at a time and show up. And then it will start to get easier. Everyone is here to support you.

    Sending cyber (((Hugs))).

  • alicebastable
    alicebastable Member Posts: 1,945
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    Please breathe. With just a few exceptions, every single one of us who is a member here has heard the same, or similar, diagnosis. If we can do it, so can you.

  • Smichaels11
    Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
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    Thank you. Without a doubt this has been the worst day or my life. Why are all statistics only through 5 years? What happens after that? Will I live to old age or is 5 years all I get? Is 35 it for me?

  • sondraf
    sondraf Member Posts: 1,605
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    I see no one has mentioned this yet but....stay off Dr Google. No, seriously, step away from looking this up and researching. Stick to this site for information or a few others may suggest. A lot of stats online are out of date and until you know the stage and type of cancer you have, there is no reason to go scaring yourself into oblivion.

    Someone else will be along shortly to answer the sticky 'stats' issue, but in short no one can say, cancer or no cancer, if you will live to an old age or die young or die of what cause. BC is highly treatable and most women pass through this site through their treatment and have no cause to use it again. Unless you are truly unlucky like the de novo women, then there isn't any reason to think you couldn't have a similar outcome.

    There are a few ladies on the site in the low 30s, but the youngest I am aware of is 26 and she is undergoing treatment now.

    The start and the fear are a really horrible time and we have all been through it. I thought the anxiety at that level would never end but, it did once I had a plan of attack. It will end for you as well.

  • beesie.is.out-of-office
    beesie.is.out-of-office Member Posts: 1,435
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    Don't worry about the 5 year stats. That's only because most research studies only have the money to follow people for 5 years. So there is a ton of data available for 5 years, but beyond 5 years the studies with longer term data are very specific and therefore can't be accumulated into broad "survival rate" numbers. Once you know your own diagnosis, you will be able to dig around and find longer term data.

  • Smichaels11
    Smichaels11 Member Posts: 112
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    What I can't seem to find is where it says that after all this cancer nonsense that you move on with your normal life and grow old. It makes me sad that I can't find it.