Come join others currently navigating treatment in our weekly Zoom Meetup! Register here: Tuesdays, 1pm ET.
Fill Out Your Profile to share more about you. Learn more...

High Dose Vitamin C Cancer Treatment

Options
fredericknp
fredericknp Member Posts: 2
edited March 2023 in Alternative Medicine

Why are oncologists so resistant to high dose IV vitamin C?

I have completed a lot of research into non-toxic cancer treatments that improve the bodies ability to heal from cancer and reduce it's impact on well being. I do not think any other "alternative" or "complimentary" treatment has as much promising evidence as high doses of intravenous vitamin C. There is a tremendous amount of momentum growing for researching this treatment. Over the last 5 years the National Cancer Institute has invested millions of dollars in grants to study this treatment (Hopkins, Holden, Mayo). More and more prominent doctors are starting to speak up about this as a potential treatment that can help improve outcomes, here is an example from an article published by NCI: https://www.cancer.gov/research/key-initiatives/ra...

At this point dozens of studies show in petri dishes, animals, and humans that high concentrations of vitamin c in the blood (specifically, over 1,000 micromole/L) can damage cancer cells or initiate cell death. NCI accredited Holden Comprehensive Cancer has completed 5 clinical studies, and has 8 currently ongoing. They have shown peak vitamin C blood concentrations above 20,000 micromole/L is an effective target that leads to cancer cell death. Here is a news report recorded on February 2023 where Dr. Cullen of Holden describes the vitamin C treatment as a way to kill cancer. He explains the blood concentration levels can not be achieved orally, only via an IV (delivery requires a medical professional). A bunch of studies including this one published in July of 2022 by prominent NIH researcher Mark Levine confirm high doses of vitamin C is safe for cancer patients: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40262-022-01142-1 . In addition to clinical studies, IV vitamin C has been administered by Integrative Oncologists for decades, some researchers have recorded the safety of it's use in clinic.

As mentioned, there are a lot of scientific studies into this treatment. This article summarizes them in a way that non-scientist can understand; it describes the history of vitamin C use for cancer, oral vs IV intake, clinical study evidence, and the reported mechanisms of action. They also show their work by providing links to 70+ clinical studies: https://www.personalizedmedicinemd.co/medical-arti... Also, at this time major cancer centers like Johns Hopkins, Mayo, and Sloan Kettering have large studies that use high doses of vitamin C for cancer treatment.

Now, back to my question... despite immense amount of evidence that shows high doses of vitamin C is not toxic to cancer patients, it also has been shown to IMPROVE "standard" treatments like chemo and radiation while reducing side effects, and can kill/control cancer cells on it's own, why are most rank and file oncologists unwilling to discuss it as even a adjunctive/complimentary treatment? The Doctors talking about it's effectiveness are not quacks, they work at NCI, NIH, and major cancer hospitals. Meanwhile, oncologists have no problem going off-label for non-FDA approved chemo combinations, but off-label vitamin C is a no-go for them. Sure, people that can pay out of pocket for vitamin C infusions can get it, but to have a shot at insurance covering IV vitamin C the Doctor needs to be onboard. Has anyone found success in getting the Doctor to consider vitamin C research and prescribe it? Can people that have used it at any point in treatment weigh in as to how they were able to incorporate it (oncological doctor prescribed or found your own practitioner that would administer it)?

Thanks for your help!

Comments

  • weninwi
    weninwi Member Posts: 748
    edited March 2023
    Options

    I read the original posting. What does "removed by the Community" mean? Who exactly did the removing and why? This forum is described as "a safe, judgement-free place to discuss Alternative medicine." Obviously a judgement has been made by someone. Did the person who first posted the information delete the posting? I think transparency is needed.



  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,755
    edited March 2023
    Options

    weninwi,

    Removed by community means that there was a community rules violation that was reported by several members. Without being able to see what was removed, it would be difficult to comment on that issue but my experience over a decade here on bco has been that the vast majority of removals by community are indeed in violation of community rules.

    With respect to your comment on this being a this being a safe place, while true, comments must still not violate community rules. Additionally, bco has never been a good source for alternative treatments and that is also stated in the header; “Breastcancer.org does NOT recommend or endorse alternative medicine."

    Forum rules of conduct are clear. What type of transparency are you looking for? (Sorry but this didn’t format correctly when I copy/pasted it but it’s still readable).

    Guidelines for using the community discussion forums: Be upfront about who you are and why you are here. We want our members to feel comfortable posting and sharing here, and knowing that the people they're talking to "get it" goes a long way toward making that happen. Say hello and introduce yourself. If you are new, write a post to introduce yourself. If you see someone else is new, say hello. Share as much of your story as you're comfortable with, and remember that by completing your profile and making your post signature public, you will be able to share more about your experience and find others facing a similar situation. Remember the forums are public. Do not use your real name; choose a unique username. We discourage members from posting any personally identifying information; such as phone numbers, email addresses, or home or work addresses. The level of anonymity you choose to operate under is up to you. For your safety and the safety of the rest of the community, we encourage you to use caution when posting personal or private information. For private information you may choose to share with other members, use the private message function. Of course, we also encourage you to use caution with the private message functions as well. There are lots of ways for you to participate on your own terms. We encourage you to post and comment on others' posts, or start your own new discussion. We will invite you to attend events and meetups here. You can also participate in surveys and answer questions that are asked of our members. Please know that Breastcancer.org asks all third-parties to go through the appropriate channels to ask questions of our community. If you have questions about this process or want to share a survey, please contact community@breastcancer.org. A zero tolerance policy for bullying and/or abusive behavior is in place. You must be respectful of every person's position. No name calling, no harassment, no personal attacks against other members or our moderators. Any violation of this policy will result in your immediate removal from the community discussion forums. Imposters and people impersonating others or misrepresenting their experience with breast cancer will be removed. Members are allowed one account and one account only, so please don't create multiple accounts for yourself. We'll delete additional accounts. If you forget your username or password, click "Reset your password" on the login page and follow the instructions. Post your own ideas and thoughts. If you share something that doesn't belong to you or is copyrighted, make sure to cite your source. This also includes copyrighted images. Source and cite any studies, statistics, images, or information that you're sharing. If the source you cite is not reputable, the moderators may ask you to delete the post. No cross-posting, please. Cross-posting means posting the same message in multiple categories or topics. Choose the single most appropriate category and topic for your post. Spamming the forums or private messages with links, advertisements, or solicitations for businesses or services is not permitted. If we see spam or it is reported by other members, it will be removed and will result in the removal of your account. If you offer a service that you think would be beneficial to community members, contact community@breastcancer.org for review. You may not collect any information about or intellectual property from other members for your own use, personal or otherwise without the express written consent of Breastcancer.org and its members. To obtain consent, please contact community@breastcancer.org. You may not upload or post files that contain viruses or worms that would harm members' computer software or data. You may not violate local, state, national, or international law in your use of the community discussion forums. Breastcancer.org reserves the right to terminate or limit your access to the community without notice. Please, if you are having thoughts of suicide or self-injury, please seek immediate professional assistance. You may call 911 (or, if not in the United States, the comparable emergency number in your country), visit a hospital emergency room, or call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 988. Breastcancer.org and our moderators are not in a position to assist you. In summary, please use common sense, treat others as you expect to be treated, and help us build a great community experience for everyone. Read Breastcancer.org's Terms of Use and Privacy Notice. — Last updated on March 22, 2023 at 8:17 AM Was this article helpful? Yes No Join in the conversation about info & resources for new members Connect with a supportive community of people discussing thousands of topics in hundreds of forums on our discussion boards. Our community welcomes anyone and everyone diagnosed with breast cancer, concerned about a breast condition, or caring for a loved one affected by breast cancer. Learn more

    This information is provided by Breastcancer.org.
    Donate to support free resources and programming for people affected by breast cancer.

  • alicebastable
    alicebastable Member Posts: 1,939
    edited March 2023
    Options

    Considering the type of post fredericknp has made, they should provide their credentials if they are going to claim any type of medical expertise. We've seen hundreds, probably thousands, of people on BCO who equate poking around on Google for an hour with actual medical research.

  • bright55
    bright55 Member Posts: 146
    edited March 2023
    Options

    For me with a mets Diagnosis I am viligant in avoiding high vitamin c intake

    vit c IVis not recommened while chemo regimes are the therapy option for BC ands Mets BC as they can be counterreactive to the chemo treatment

    As well there are a number of targeted new drug therapies combinations for both BC and Mets BC which state that higher than normal doses of vitamin c are not to be taken ..Drug pharma info can even state that certain citrus like blood orange are not to be injested