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Fertility drug connection???

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Comments

  • Srh242
    Srh242 Member Posts: 139
    edited February 2014

    It makes sense Agness

  • Srh242
    Srh242 Member Posts: 139
    edited February 2014

    bump

  • Srh242
    Srh242 Member Posts: 139
    edited May 2014

    bump

  • rebzamy
    rebzamy Member Posts: 49
    edited May 2014

    Question:  I went through 3 lots of egg donation for somebody very close to me and then was diagnosed with breast cancer probably around 2 years later.  The breast cancer was NOT hormonal, it was HER2+ - does this mean that the drugs I took for the egg donation could still possibly have caused my breast cancer even though it was not hormone positive?  Or could this be just one of those things.  Just wondering ...

  • Srh242
    Srh242 Member Posts: 139
    edited September 2014

    bump

  • melissadallas
    melissadallas Member Posts: 929
    edited September 2014

    Studies seem to indicate they are NOT a risk

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-04/aaf...

  • Srh242
    Srh242 Member Posts: 139
    edited October 2014

    bump

  • alicia_en_madrid
    alicia_en_madrid Member Posts: 15
    edited January 2015

    Hello, I would like to have more information on this.

    Thank you.

    Alicia

  • Srh242
    Srh242 Member Posts: 139
    edited January 2015

    Hi : the last studies said no connection yet to fertility drugs .

  • MaryJC
    MaryJC Member Posts: 61
    edited February 2015

    I too took clomid. I think there is a connection when Dx'd with er+ BC. Fertility is BIG business. They're not ready on own this one. Imagine the law suits- which I've read there are some on-going.

  • Srh242
    Srh242 Member Posts: 139
    edited December 2016

    bum

  • NicolaSue
    NicolaSue Member Posts: 18
    edited September 2017

    Oh there's definitely a connection.

    I have had loads and loads of IVF. Probably around 15 rounds of IVF with fresh embryos. I've also had several frozen embryos and that requires that you take oestrogen for several months even after the pregnancy is established. I had my last child in 2014, via IVF. I was then due to have one final child with our frozen embryos. I had two goes with the full whammy of oestrogen and progesterone but both pregnancies ended in the first trimester. I was then due to have one final go in Feb of this year but just based on a gut instinct of things not being right I had a memmo and lobular carcimona in situ was found. I met with a professor from one of the best cancer hospitals in the UK and his feeling was that fertility drugs are definitely causal in BC but it may be a few years yet before research publishes that definitively.

  • lifeisnoteasy
    lifeisnoteasy Member Posts: 5
    edited February 2020

    Hi there

    I have been newly diagnosed breast cancer last week with no history of breast cancer, i was shocked and sad:'( I can't believe! however my doctor belived or suspected because of my hormones has strike me after I gave birth last year . I have read your article about fertility drugs and breast cancer ,and I do agree there are some connection between them because the last time when I tried to get pregnant I also had to use fertility drugs , fyi I have no fertility issues but my husband did ,but in oder to follow the programs I also have to take fertility drugs n some injections.,I wish I could pregnant again however the doctor suggested/planned to induce my menapouse to be earlier than it was supposed if this is a cause of my breast cancer . anyway how about your treatment? What was the outcome?Thanks a lot



  • coraleliz
    coraleliz Member Posts: 158
    edited February 2020

    Or perhaps the infertility(or what caused it,perhaps not fully understood) is the culprit & not the drugs. I did go through infertility treatments.

  • Cricketdog
    Cricketdog Member Posts: 48
    edited February 2020

    Hello. I'm new here and your post poses one of the first questions I asked my oncologist after being told I needed chemo.

    I did one round of IUI followed by IVF in my late 30s. Subchorionic hematoma at 12 weeks forced the extended use of progesterone and estrogen to maintain the pregnancy. I was P/E+ at BC diagnosis. Also on birth control for many years to control heavy bleeding, clotting and fibroids.

    So, my oncologist said personally, he believes there is certainly a connection; however,no studies have shown the connection but he claims it's due to changes in IVF processes, including hormone regimens. The pharma companies change their drugs every five years or so and finding a group of women who used the same drug regimen and also got BC years later makes for difficult study group formation.

    While I imagine we will all say fertility treatments were worth it in the end, I wonder how we'd approach treatment if it's ever shown there is a link. I believe more vigilance is usually a good thing.

  • Cricketdog
    Cricketdog Member Posts: 48
    edited February 2020

    Hello. I'm new here and your post poses one of the first questions I asked my oncologist after being told I needed chemo.

    I did one round of IUI followed by IVF in my late 30s. Subchorionic hematoma at 12 weeks forced the extended use of progesterone and estrogen to maintain the pregnancy. I was P/E+ at BC diagnosis. Also on birth control for many years to control heavy bleeding, clotting and fibroids.

    So, my oncologist said personally, he believes there is certainly a connection; however,no studies have shown the connection but he claims it's due to changes in IVF processes, including hormone regimens. The pharma companies change their drugs every five years or so and finding a group of women who used the same drug regimen and also got BC years later makes for difficult study group formation.

    While I imagine we will all say fertility treatments were worth it in the end, I wonder how we'd approach treatment if it's ever shown there is a link. I believe more vigilance is usually a good thing.

  • HH25
    HH25 Member Posts: 4
    edited March 2020

    I definitely feel there’s a connection. I did one round of IVF at 44, then started HRT after my twins were born when my doc did a blood test and realized I was going through menopause (which probably caused my pregnancy issues leading me to do IVF in the first place). 4 years later, I was diagnosed with BC with ER+ 100% and PR+ 99%.

  • murfy
    murfy Member Posts: 254
    edited March 2020

    The fertility drug Clomid is an anti-estrogen (think, tamoxifen) that reduces estrogen action, thus allowing increases in the pituitary hormones (LH/FSH) responsible for developing the follicles that will ovulate. Moreover, pregnancy and # of pregnancies is shown to reduce BC risk.

    The estrogen/progesterone injections necessary to maintain a difficult pregnancy in pre-menopausal women are short-term and have not been shown to be linked to breast cancer in the long-term:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2363045/

    More worrisome is the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study that showed menopausal women on long term oral estrogen+progesterone are more likely to get BC than control group or estrogen-only.

    So IMO, I don't think infertility treatment per se is causing BC. BUT, hormones aren't innocuous and links with BC have been shown, particularly in older women.


  • Barbara31
    Barbara31 Member Posts: 1
    edited August 2021

    As we have discussed at fertially.com, women remain fertile until menopause occurs, the average age of which is 51 years. However, most women fail to conceive a baby already at the age of forty. These indicators apply to both those who are trying to conceive in the traditional way and those who are undergoing fertility treatment, including in vitro fertilization. The stories broadcast in the media can lead women and their partners to the mistaken idea that no matter what, it is possible to get pregnant using such procedures. But do not forget that a woman's age still affects the likelihood of a cure for infertility.