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Can a biopsy needle rupture the membrane of a DCIS and make it invasive?

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Hi! I’m concerned about the consequences of having a biopsy. I know it is to lower the number of surgeries regarding benign lesions but I wonder:

The definition of DCIS is (according to cancer.org) that “ the cells that line the ducts have changed to cancer cells but they have NOT spread through the walls of the ducts into the nearby breast tissue”

The definition of IDC(according to nationalbreastcancer.org) is that “ Invasive Ductal Carcinoma is an invasive cancer where abnormal cancer cells that began forming in the milk ducts have spread beyond the ducts into other parts of the breast tissue.” 

My question is: Can DCIS cells escape to the surrounding area through the hole made by the needle through the duct AND the membrane of the DCIS and turn it into invasive?

Comments

  • needs.a.nap
    needs.a.nap Member Posts: 190
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    Hi @dana01. I asked that exact question of one of my nurses and she explained that if any DCIS cells did leak out of the duct during the biopsy, they would not survive, that they would need to undergo some molecular changes before developing “invasive” capability and being able to survive outside of the duct. I’m sure I’m not saying that in the best way. Hopefully someone else can explain it better or point us to a good reference?

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,855
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    What you are asking about is referred to as seeding. However , needs a nap gave a good explanation of why this doesn’t happen and in general, seeding is a theory for which almost no real life evidence exists when it comes to breast cancer. Take care

  • tb90
    tb90 Member Posts: 280
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    Hi Dana01: DCIS cells are not prevented from spreading, they don’t have the ability to spread. This won’t change by displacement. No matter where they go, they are non invasive and cannot spread. Eventually they can become invasive, thus the need to treat. But they can remain non invasive for years and perhaps even forever. A biopsy will have no effect on this so please do not worry.