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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 20, 2017 11:31PM - edited Nov 20, 2017 11:35PM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Posts 1591 - 1620 (1,637 total)

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Nov 2, 2019 10:00AM santabarbarian wrote:

Love the melatonin info. I have been on 20 mg at night since diagnosis (I worked up to that amount). I sleep very restfully and easily.

pCR after neoadjuvant chemo w/ integrative practices Dx 7/13/2018, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- (FISH) Chemotherapy 8/13/2018 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 12/27/2018 Lumpectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 2/11/2019 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
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Nov 2, 2019 10:54AM Lumpie wrote:

Living Proof

{This isn't exactly news, but some may be interested in this 2008 movie. It is a dramatization about Dr. Slamon who was instramental in developing developed Herceptin. Free to watch on YouTube.}

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vIzJQowcyM&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR38-Ui2PSpCqwn1uWfFT2n9oNz0yxHu-zPXyiLjvrvz29rZ9wyWtcrG6l4


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 2, 2019 12:34PM Lumpie wrote:

New Study Shows Regional Differences in Improved Survival of Patients with De Novo Metastatic Breast Cancer Over Time The newly published article looked at regional differences in survival in patients with de novo MBC (dnMBC), which is a first diagnosis of breast cancer that is stage IV. The authors studied dnMBC patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 registry....They also studied an institutional cohort...They found that 5-year survival with dnMBC is different depending on where the patients lived. Survival also improved as new treatments were introduced. For patients followed from 1990 through the present day.... women with dnMBC had a 5-year survival rate of 44% compared to 20% of women with rMBC (recurrent MBC). Over the 20-year period, dnMBC 5-year survival improved ...from 28% to 55%, but rMBC survival decreased over time. The authors found a significant decline in rMBC over time, but no increase in survival.
Details and links to articles here:
https://www.mbcalliance.org/new-study-shows-regional-differences-in-improved-survival-of-patients-with-de-novo-metastatic-breast-cancer-over-time?fbclid=IwAR0vXtUvDSZ3TqbXdloFaa6h_FO7sjIvR9I_QAKYB69taB_2UJbeI_lJRWY
https://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/26/6/809

DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0889 Published June 2017

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10549-017-4529-5

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-017-4529-5

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10549-018-05090-y

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-018-05090-y



"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 2, 2019 12:45PM thisiknow wrote:

Lumpie... that Chemo may be helping to spread the cancer and trigger more aggressive tumors is very unsettling indeed, to borrow Rah's word. I'll be asking my MO about this one.

Age 72 @dx - Oncotype 4 Dx 8/2019, DCIS/IDC, Both breasts, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 1, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Radiation Therapy 10/28/2019 Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Left, Right; Lymph node removal: Sentinel
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Nov 2, 2019 01:42PM JaBoo wrote:

Lumpie thank you for the link for Living proof! I've been trying to get it for about 2 months now, but unsuccesfully! Nowhere to see it legally in my country. I am watching it tonight. thank you

dx at 38 Dx 5/22/2018, IDC, Left, 2cm, Grade 3, 1/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (FISH) Surgery 6/14/2018 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Surgery 6/19/2018 Lumpectomy: Left Hormonal Therapy 7/16/2018 Zoladex (goserelin) Chemotherapy 7/16/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Targeted Therapy 9/13/2018 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Hormonal Therapy 1/11/2019 Aromasin (exemestane) Surgery 1/21/2019 Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Hormonal Therapy 6/27/2019 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Nov 3, 2019 06:43AM - edited Nov 3, 2019 07:14AM by debbew

Simple blood test could spot breast cancer five years before any symptom

The new research, presented at the National Cancer Research Institute's conference in Glasgow, found that a blood test could identify changes in the body's immune response to substances produced by tumour cells...

Presenting the research at the NCRI Conference, researcher Daniyah Alfattani said: "The results of our study showed that breast cancer does induce autoantibodies against panels of specific tumour-associated antigens. We were able to detect cancer with reasonable accuracy by identifying these autoantibodies in the blood."

The most successful technique was able to identify disease in 37 per cent of cases with cancer, and rule it out, in 79 per cent of the control group.

"We need to develop and further validate this test," said Ms Alfattani. "However, these results are encouraging and indicate that it's possible to detect a signal for early breast cancer. Once we have improved the accuracy of the test, then it opens the possibility of using a simple blood test to improve early detection of the disease..."

Researchers said that with sufficient investment, tests could be available in clinics in four to five years.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/11/03/simple-blood-test-could-spot-breast-cancer-five-years-symptom/

ETA more info at this link: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-11/ncri-sbt103119.php


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Nov 3, 2019 05:34PM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

Lumpie - thank you for the Washington Post link. A lot of misinformation and out right lies out there. Already confusing with the rapidly changing diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and the varying degree of success for each INDIVIDUAL. Sometimes I get discouraged hearing the "adds" from various cancer centers / cancer research centers that sponsor NPR. It sounds like there are individualized successful treatments, and for most, this just is not true. But the science is rapidly evolving, and maybe, someday there will be.

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Nov 4, 2019 02:11PM BevJen wrote:

Public service announcement (not exactly breaking news):

If you live in the Baltimore/Washington area, I just got an update from the Cancer Research Institute (very pro immunotherapy) regarding an information session they are doing in Baltimore on Saturday, Nov. 16th from 10-3:30. It is free and looks quite interesting. The main speaker is Dr. Elizabeth Jaffee, the co director of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Hopkins. They are also going to have navigators there to talk with you about possible clinical trials. You can google Cancer Research Institute to get further info.

Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap
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Nov 5, 2019 06:03AM - edited Nov 5, 2019 06:04AM by debbew

For some cancer patients, monitoring symptoms can extend their lives

A growing body of research has found that people with cancer who are routinely prompted to answer questions about their symptoms may live months longer and have a higher quality of life than people who don't track their symptoms as closely...

The results [of a new study analysing results from over 120,000 matched pairs of patients who were/were not surveyed about symptoms], published in May, were startling. Patients who answered the survey were less than half as likely to have died during the study period than people who never answered the questions.

Until the past few years, the idea that a patient's experience could be measured and then inform treatment decisions was seen as being too nebulous to be useful in treating cancer...

[An RCT published in 2017] found that people who reported their symptoms via the online program lived, on average, five months longer than people who didn't... [Another RCT published in 2017] reported in their preliminary analysis that patients who monitored symptoms lived, on average, seven months longer than patients who didn't. Earlier this year, their final analysis confirmed that survival benefit...

Wong said many institutions around the world have launched new programs to capture patient-symptom data with varied success.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/for-some-can...



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Nov 5, 2019 07:23AM debbew wrote:

Targeting metastatic breast cancer with CAR T-cell immunotherapy

A team of researchers from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and its partner institutions, University of Washington and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, just received a coveted Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program Breakthrough award.

The four-year, $4 million award, led by principal investigators Drs. Cyrus Ghajar and Stanley Riddell of Fred Hutch, will launch an innovative investigation aimed at preventing late-onset, metastatic breast cancer. The team is developing an immunotherapy strategy utilizing immune cells called T cells that are armed with tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptors, or CARs...

Ghajar's research, along with that of his postdoctoral researchers Goddard and Grzelak, focuses on disseminated tumor cells, or DTCs, the tumor cells that can lie dormant in breast cancer patients for years or decades after treatment for early stage disease before emerging as metastasis...

Using new advances in protein design developed in the Baker Lab at UW, the researchers believe it is possible to engineer unique, customizable CARs that will be highly specific for DTCs and can direct T cells to kill them.

https://www.fredhutch.org/en/news/center-news/2019/11/targeting-metastatic-breast-cancer-car-t-cell-immunotherapy.html


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Nov 5, 2019 09:06AM LaughingGull wrote:

On chemo helping the cancer spread, here is an interesting article from the website Science Based Medicine that explains the nuances in those results. The article takes issue with some promoters of alternative remedies that used that study to peddle their stuff. Skip that part and you will find a very good analysis of what these results say about chemo and cancer spread.

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/does-chemotherapy-cause-cancer-to-spread/

ACx4, THPx4, HP (to complete 1y); Nerlynx (1y); AI (expected 10y), Surgery: BMX + ALND, Reconstruction, Oophorectomy. Radiation. Dx 10/26/2017, IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 2/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC)
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Nov 5, 2019 10:57AM Frisky wrote:

Hi all,

the deadly results and statistics of conventional therapies speak for themselves...I can't believe that any intelligent person would defend the status quo, where 30% of stage 1 BC patients will eventually be diagnosed stage 4...

Instead of defending chemotherapy, they should work harder at finding treatments that not only work, but don't require that we lose life and limbs in the process...


“Things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many; the intelligence of a few perceives what has been carefully hidden.” Phaedrus Dx 3/9/2015, ILC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 3/15/2015 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy 3/10/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy 3/10/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Surgery 4/5/2017 Radiation Therapy 4/10/2017 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 1/5/2018 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Targeted Therapy 2/10/2018 Afinitor (everolimus) Chemotherapy 6/2/2018 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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Nov 5, 2019 11:25AM hapa wrote:

Frisky - what is your source for that 30% of Stage I patients progressing to Stage IV number? People keep quoting that number but nobody has been able to produce a study showing that. At best, people come up with references to other people who have also quoted the number without backing it up. It seems like this 30% number that everybody throws around is based on something one single person said many years ago, also with no study to back it up. If you look at the actual number of women diagnosed with breast cancer every year vs. the number dying of it every year, that works out to ~15%. So if 100 women are dx'd with breast cancer at any stage in a given year, 15 will die of it in the same year. And the 100 women includes the 6-10% of women who are stage IV de novo. So are there scores of women getting stage IV breast cancer who go on to die of other causes? I don't understand how these numbers can add up.

Dx 12/14/2017, IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 3, ER+/PR+, HER2- (FISH) Hormonal Therapy 1/1/2018 Zoladex (goserelin) Hormonal Therapy 1/1/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole) Targeted Therapy 2/13/2018 Ibrance (palbociclib) Dx 3/20/2018, IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIIA, 3/18 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (FISH) Targeted Therapy 3/27/2018 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 3/27/2018 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 3/27/2018 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 8/22/2018 Lymph node removal: Right, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Left; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Radiation Therapy 10/22/2018 Whole-breast: Lymph nodes, Chest wall Hormonal Therapy 12/20/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole), Zoladex (goserelin) Targeted Therapy Nerlynx
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Nov 5, 2019 11:31AM - edited Nov 5, 2019 12:31PM by ShetlandPony

To begin with, that would be 20%- 30% of early stage, which includes stages one through three, not just stage one.

I don't want to derail this thread. There is a discussion of this figure on the web site of Metastatic Breast Cancer Network, a reliable source in my opinion. There is also a long BCO thread on the topic.

2011 Stage I ILC ER+PR+ Her2- 1.5 cm grade 1, ITCs sn . Lumpectomy, radiation, tamoxifen. 2014 Stage IV ILC ER+PR+Her2- grade 2, mets to breast , liver. Taxol NEAD. 2015,2016 Ibrance+letrozole. 2017 Faslodex+Afnitor; Xeloda. 2018,2019 Xeloda NEAD
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Nov 5, 2019 12:06PM - edited Nov 5, 2019 12:12PM by debbew

Here's an article about the issue of provenance of that statistic:

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/849644#vp_1

Upshot: the origin of the stat appeared to be iffy:

a 1989 study of 644 patients with stage I (T1N0M0) or stage II (T1N1M0) breast carcinoma, all treated with mastectomy (J Clin Oncol. 1989;7:1239-1251). During the median follow-up of 18 years, 148 patients (23%) died of recurrent breast carcinoma.

Dr van't Veer and her colleagues presumably rounded their figures up (from 23% to 33%) because the referenced population included only patients with stage I and II disease, and therefore did not comprise all early-stage disease.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the definition of early-stage breast cancer is that which has not spread beyond the breast or the axillary lymph nodes. The range includes stage I, stage IIA, stage IIB, and stage IIIA disease.

So this particular 30%-ish statement from Dr van't Veer and colleagues appears to be an estimate based on a clinical study that is not contemporary. In short, it is not strong evidence.

The article goes on to describe an informal analysis of SEER data:

They looked at breast-cancer-specific mortality (as identified on death certificates) in 12 health districts in the United States from 2008 to 2012. They were surprised by the finding: "28% of the women who died of breast cancer during that time period had localized disease at diagnosis," said Dr Brawley.

But that's not the same as the percentage of early stage beast cancers that progress.

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Nov 5, 2019 12:29PM LaughingGull wrote:

Wow I didn't expect a furious reaction after posting additional information to help put in context the terrifying assertion that neoadjuvant chemo causes cancer cells to spread and fuels metastases. Here is my takeaway from the article, which is hard to disprove:

<<Tumor cell dissemination as a result of chemotherapy reduces, not eliminates, the benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and it certainly does not "make cancer spread" in such a way that neoadjuvant chemotherapy is worse than no chemotherapy.>>

ACx4, THPx4, HP (to complete 1y); Nerlynx (1y); AI (expected 10y), Surgery: BMX + ALND, Reconstruction, Oophorectomy. Radiation. Dx 10/26/2017, IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 2/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC)
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Nov 5, 2019 12:35PM - edited Nov 5, 2019 12:40PM by ShetlandPony

Unfortunately SEER counts people with de novo stage four breast cancer, but does not count people who had stage one, two, or three and then had a metastatic recurrence. The recurrence is ignored.

Again, I recommend reading the section about mbc statistics at MBCN. Org. There are sources cited for the information and a discussion of why the figure is hard to pin down.

2011 Stage I ILC ER+PR+ Her2- 1.5 cm grade 1, ITCs sn . Lumpectomy, radiation, tamoxifen. 2014 Stage IV ILC ER+PR+Her2- grade 2, mets to breast , liver. Taxol NEAD. 2015,2016 Ibrance+letrozole. 2017 Faslodex+Afnitor; Xeloda. 2018,2019 Xeloda NEAD
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Nov 5, 2019 12:40PM - edited Nov 5, 2019 01:08PM by Frisky

Hapa..for me it's very simple...what are my odds of surviving stage 4? I'm being treated at MSK, and my various MOs there have NEVER EVER given me any hope...mind you...till a few months ago I had Mets only in the bones...I have progressed with Mets to the liver while being treated...some might find this okay...I find this disheartening....

As far as the 20 or 30% progressing...it's a well known fact, that's being accounted—surely optimistically—for by our conventional cancer institutions.

As far as this web site is concerned, most of the people still alive after 5 years are on Herceptin, which seems to be the only reliable treatment...and yet, recently one of our members that is on Herceptin came up with depressing statistics...better than the non HER2 disasters, but still disarming...

Also, this site is another precious source of information regarding progression from early stages, all you have to is read the info at the bottom.

Ultimately, we are all free to chose what to believe and I respect anyone that thinks the odds are improving...yes that could be true....but in comparison to what?

“Things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many; the intelligence of a few perceives what has been carefully hidden.” Phaedrus Dx 3/9/2015, ILC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 3/15/2015 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy 3/10/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy 3/10/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Surgery 4/5/2017 Radiation Therapy 4/10/2017 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 1/5/2018 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Targeted Therapy 2/10/2018 Afinitor (everolimus) Chemotherapy 6/2/2018 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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Nov 5, 2019 05:02PM LaughingGull wrote:

frisky, just wanted to sympathize; any kind of breast cancer sucks; chemo is brutal; metastatic breast cancer sucks exponentially more than non-metastatic breast cancer; breast cancer is a formidable challenge for medicine; it is phenomenally complex and the more we learn about it, the more complex it becomes. I am also for science and data and evidence-based medicine, and in my view alternative therapies are alternative not because they are an alternative, but because they cannot be proven to work by any reasonable standard -otherwise, they would become mainstream and conventional. To me, beyond science and reason and evidence, there simply is no alternative.

That article about neoadjuvant chemo causing spread doesn't mean one is better off without chemo. No need to terrorize us even more than we already are.

ACx4, THPx4, HP (to complete 1y); Nerlynx (1y); AI (expected 10y), Surgery: BMX + ALND, Reconstruction, Oophorectomy. Radiation. Dx 10/26/2017, IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 2/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC)
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Nov 5, 2019 05:31PM - edited Nov 5, 2019 06:08PM by Frisky

laughingull I didn't mean to scare anyone, the reality of the scientific facts and statistics are scary enough...the problem is that since I'm no longer disassociated from reality, I can no longer avail myself of the usual coping mechanisms.

I ultimately believe that knowledge will serve me better than soothing notions.

you're right...we don't really have any viable choices..all are known to be at best unreliable ..otherwise why would cancer, and better yet, cancer treatments be so terrifying?
and maybe not...I'm sure there are some people that can easily cope with the surgery, radiation, chemo...and the next ten years of estrogen suppression....I do ultimately wish you and everyone else a fearless experience and successful outcome.

“Things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many; the intelligence of a few perceives what has been carefully hidden.” Phaedrus Dx 3/9/2015, ILC, Left, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 3/15/2015 Femara (letrozole) Targeted Therapy 3/10/2017 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy 3/10/2017 Faslodex (fulvestrant) Surgery 4/5/2017 Radiation Therapy 4/10/2017 External: Bone Hormonal Therapy 1/5/2018 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Targeted Therapy 2/10/2018 Afinitor (everolimus) Chemotherapy 6/2/2018 Xeloda (capecitabine)
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Nov 5, 2019 06:13PM LaughingGull wrote:

frisky,

I agree, knowledge is power. Much love and peace,

LaughingGull

Heart

ACx4, THPx4, HP (to complete 1y); Nerlynx (1y); AI (expected 10y), Surgery: BMX + ALND, Reconstruction, Oophorectomy. Radiation. Dx 10/26/2017, IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, 2/6 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC)
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Nov 6, 2019 07:34AM - edited Nov 6, 2019 07:35AM by debbew

Novel Surgery May Prevent Lymphedema in Patients with Breast Cancer

"Immediate lymphatic reconstruction is a preventive procedure to restore lymphatic connections in the arm," said Frederic Kolb, MD, plastic surgeon at UC San Diego Health. "This delicate surgery is performed at the same time the lymph nodes are removed and tested for cancer. Instead of treating patients after lymphedema presents itself, we hope to prevent the condition for patients who may be at risk."

During lymph node dissection, Kolb and his team map the drainage routes of the nodes in the upper arm. The team reconnects any disrupted channels by creating a "by-pass" to prevent swelling. Using a microscope, the team reroutes the tiny vessels, many less than the thickness of a dime...

"As a cancer surgeon, my primary goal is to accurately stage the cancer to identify which patients need more aggressive treatment," Sarah Blair, MD, surgical oncologist at UC San Diego Health. "In some patients, significant lymph node dissection can unintentionally result in damage to healthy tissue. With this procedure, we can help prevent lymphedema and give the patient a better overall experience and outcome."

https://health.ucsd.edu/news/releases/Pages/2019-11-05-novel-surgery-to-prevent-lymphedema-in-breast-cancer.aspx

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Nov 6, 2019 09:04AM Lumpie wrote:

Pharma's Ghost Labs Find New Life Finding new tenants for former drug development sites isn't always easy. But a new, thriving industry has materialized to do just that.

Big Pharma has also changed how it conducts R&D. To cut costs, companies are doing less of their own research and are instead relying on making deals with smaller companies or university research divisions that have already successfully developed drug candidates or therapeutics, and often working with contract research organizations on the continued development of those products. "The old 'make what you sell, sell what you make' is no longer the preferred strategy,"

https://www.the-scientist.com/bio-business/pharmas-ghost-labs-find-new-life-66630?utm_campaign=TS_DAILY%20NEWSLETTER_2019&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=79037221&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9sR_0DTwpMvA_cRZBNr7-FM6OmSpUtdB1vcaP6_NpLLFSbNvmTNdTLseqa1k7tpJAGM27giuW1RdmfR4DoG6uHjjjn3A&_hsmi=79037221

{Article is about real estate but has implications for pharmaceutical development, too.}

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right
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Nov 6, 2019 01:26PM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

debbew - thank you for posting the link for novel surgery and preventing lymphedema. One more question to ask the surgeon tomorrow. This is the 3rd time for me, twice left, and now on right. The oncologist feels that each is new cancer, but when pressed, said there is no real way to know since cancer mutates so much. In June I noticed my right arm was swollen. And ultra sound at urgent care showed no blood clot and I was told to see my DR. It was odd, since the surgery had been on the left side. Eventually cancer diagnosed, and the thinking was that the cancer was the source of the lymphedema rather than prior treatment. I'm worried about the upcoming surgery, concerned that it will be much more complicated since it is in the axilla this time.


2009 ER+ left breast. 52 yrs. Lumpectomy, Sentinel node removal, negative. Radiation 6 weeks, tamoxifen 5 years. Dense lumpy left breast, normal right. Acupuncture offered at facility as part of integrative medicine. It really helped with anxiety/stress during radiation treatment.

2016 ER+ left breast. Probably a new cancer, but unknown. 4 rounds TC Aug-Oct 2016, Bi-lateral (my choice) Nov 2016, no reconstruction. 2 sentinel nodes remove, negative. Cold Capping using Chemo Cold Caps (DIGNICAP not available). Anastrozole 1 mg starting May 2017. Joint issues noticed immediately. Stopped Anastrozole after 3-4 months due to joint stiffness in. After several months of no AIs, fingers were feeling better. Started tamoxifen March 2018

10/2018 noticed stiffness and some trigger finger again. Was eating meat a lot more (daily) than normal. Usually 1-2 /wk. Have cut way back on the meat, seems to help, but one finger still very prone to trigger finger. Trigger finger seemed to be getting better, but now 4/2019 seems worse, is it the break from added turmeric to meals?

7/19/2019 - swelling in R-arm, opposite side from where lymph nodes removed. Noticed 6/18/2019. Could have been swelling earlier but wearing long sleeves. Trip to urgent care. They did ultrasound, concerned that there might be a clot, there was not. Started seeing lymphatic therapist 7/2/2019.

8/2019 CT, Breast/chest , neck/thyroid ultra sound

9/2019 DR ordered biopsy, said it could be lymphoma, cancer, benign lymphatic. Biopsy R-axilla. Cancer. Genetic test showed no known markers (20+ looked for)

9/29/2019 PET scan, no indication of spread. Arimadex and Ibrance prescribed to shrink tumor prior to surgery



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Nov 7, 2019 10:13AM mysticalcity wrote:

Cryoablation and Immunotherapy: An Enthralling Synergy to Confront the Tumors

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2019.02283/full?fbclid=IwAR3dQe71SE34bmaqM57uHBmHh7LmMoUZev3H-Rpq8nmgfhaGOEdakF4Yha4

Dx 3/22/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 5/31/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole) Surgery 6/26/2019 Cryotherapy: Left Radiation Therapy
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Nov 7, 2019 06:46PM - edited Nov 7, 2019 06:46PM by debbew

^^Thanks, BGRS, hope the info was useful!


Revamped cancer drug starves tumors in mice

A bacteria-derived compound called DON... kills tumors by inhibiting several enzymes that allow cancer cells to use glutamine. In clinical trials, however, the drug provoked severe nausea and vomiting, and it was never approved.

Now, Powell and colleagues have crafted a new version of DON that may be easier to stomach. It carries two chemical groups that keep it inert until it reaches the tumor's neighborhood. There, enzymes that normally loiter around tumors remove these molecular handcuffs, unleashing the drug on the cancerous cells. With this approach, "the vast majority of the active drug is where we want," Powell says.

To test their new compound, he and colleagues injected four types of cancer cells into mice, inducing tumors. They then dosed some of the animals with their next-generation DON. The drug worked against all four kinds of tumors, the scientists report today in Science. In untreated mice, for example, colon cancer tumors had grown more than five times larger after about 3 weeks. But in rodents that received DON, the tumors shrank and almost disappeared. The researchers found that the drug wasn't just throttling glutamine metabolism. It was also disrupting other aspects of the cells' biochemistry, such as their ability to use the sugar glucose.

One concern about drugs that target cancer cell metabolism is that they will also poison normal cells, including the immune cells that battle tumors. But Powell and colleagues found that their version of DON revved up T cells to destroy cancer cells. The scientists discovered that T cells deprived of glutamine by DON could switch to an alternative source of the raw materials needed to synthesize DNA and other key molecules, whereas tumor cells couldn't.

...Powell says safety testing of the drug will begin in people [next year].

Article: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/11/revamped-cancer-drug-starves-tumors-mice

Paper (abstract is free): https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2019/11/06/science.aav2588

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Nov 10, 2019 07:50AM debbew wrote:

Human trials to begin next year using a virus to kill cancer

Scientists have created a new cowpox-style virus in a bid to cure cancer.

The treatment, called CF33, can kill every type of cancer in a petrie dish and has shrunk tumours in mice, The Daily Telegraph reported.

US cancer expert Professor Yuman Fong is engineering the treatment, which is being developed by Australia biotech company Imugene.

They are hoping the treatment will be tested on breast cancer patients, among other cancer sufferers, next year.

https://www.msn.com/en-nz/news/techandscience/breakthrough-as-scientists-create-a-new-cowpox-style-virus-that-can-kill-every-type-of-cancer/ar-BBWwhcp

More context at: https://www.frontpagelive.com/2019/11/09/the-new-cure-that-can-kill-every-type-of-cancer-the-story-of-science-viruses-hope-and-money/

Company webpage about this virus: https://www.imugene.com/oncolytic-virus

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Nov 10, 2019 01:24PM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

Cowpox like virus to treat cancer? Amazing. Cowpox is what was initially used to vaccinate against smallpox. Jefferson saw this used in France, and introduced to to the US. Fortunately, the vaccine came a long ways since those days. With the elimination of smallpox world wide, the vaccine is no longer part of the usual vaccines. I wonder how this new treatment will work on those of us old enough to have gotten a smallpox vaccine as a child.

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Nov 10, 2019 03:07PM mysticalcity wrote:

Not sure, but a neighbor of mine with glioblastoma that recurred after chemo/radiation is going to be treated with the polio virus--so far this polio treatment has shown the most positive results for glioblastoma as there really are not a lot of good options for that particular cancer. He said he got the polio virus immunization as a child and he had to get some sort of booster and make sure he was responding to the booster before they proceed. . .in some ways this treatment sounds similar. Here is some info on the polio virus thing he is doing. . .

"The poliovirus receptor is present on all solid tumors, which means that all solid tumors will get infected by the genetically modified poliovirus if put in contact with it," she said. "Another positive is that the poliovirus survives for only a short period of time: It triggers the infection and the immune activation, but then disappears. It does not stay around and decrease the long term immune response like other viruses might do."

In May 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted breakthrough therapy designation to the genetically modified poliovirus, PVSRIPO, which will hopefully help expedite research into this line of therapy.

For this study, the phase 2 trial is ongoing in adults with recurrent glioblastoma and a phase 2 trial is open for pediatric patients with a recurrent brain tumor. Investigators plan to soon begin trials in patients with melanoma and breast cancer."

https://www.curetoday.com/articles/poliovirus-extends-survival-for-patients-with-glioblastoma-in-early-phase-trial

Dx 3/22/2018, ILC/IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, ER+/PR-, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 5/31/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole) Surgery 6/26/2019 Cryotherapy: Left Radiation Therapy
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Nov 10, 2019 03:20PM BevJen wrote:

I saw the same information about the cowpox virus, and posted in on the ringworm, etc. link for stage 4 cancer. It sounds very interesting.

Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap

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