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Breaking Research News from sources other than Breastcancer.org

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  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    This is miserable news....

    Breast Symptoms at Mammogram May Raise Future Cancer Risk

    Latest Cancer News

    WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast symptoms at a regular cancer screening are more likely to develop breast cancer before their next screening, a new study finds.

    The study included women who took part in the Finnish National Breast Cancer Screening Program between 1992 and 2012. It invites women between ages 50 and 69 for mammograms every two years.

    Those women who reported breast symptoms such as lumps, nipple retraction or nipple discharge at their regular screening visit were more likely to be recalled than those without symptoms -- 15 percent vs. 3 percent.

    Compared to women with no symptoms, those with a lump had more than triple the risk for a breast cancer diagnosis before their next scheduled screening. Those with nipple discharge had twice the odds, and those with nipple retraction were 1.5 times more likely to get a cancer diagnosis, the study found.

    The study was scheduled for presentation Wednesday at the European Breast Cancer Conference, in Barcelona, Spain. Research presented at medical meetings is usually viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

    The findings indicate that "women with breast symptoms should undergo further assessment irrespective of mammography findings," study author Deependra Singh said in a conference news release. Singh is a researcher at the Finnish Cancer Registry in Helsinki.

    He noted that because mammography can miss up to 40 percent of breast tumors, women with symptoms, especially a lump, should be examined more often.

    "There is room for improvement in the capability of mammography to detect cancer and our research shows this is particularly the case for women who have breast symptoms," Singh said.

    "Our findings can be extrapolated to other countries that have national mammography screening programs, and we encourage these programs to collect and analyze information on symptoms," he said.

    -- Robert Preidt

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited March 2018
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  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited March 2018
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    Scientists link 110 genes to increased risk of breast cancer

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180313/Scienti...

    Sentinel lymph node biopsies could be safely avoided for some breast cancer patients

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180321/Sentine...

    Treating metastatic breast cancer with immunotherapy

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180319/Treatin...

    Genetic counseling missed by some breast cancer patients, study finds

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180314/Genetic...

  • Libber
    Libber Member Posts: 45
    edited March 2018
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    https://www.kiro7.com/video?videoId=719510985&videoVersion=1.0

    Wow. Virginia Mason Seattle is a well respected organization. Hoping this major breakthrough is real.

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    March 27, 2018

    Metformin Use Linked to Reduced Risk of Statin-Associated Muscle Pain

    https://www.empr.com/news/statin-muscle-symptoms-p...


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    I think this contradicts another recen study that says metastasis doesn’t happen from the lymph nodes(?)

    Full article at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/03/1803...


    Malignant tumour cells from a primary tumour have to pass into the bloodstream in order to form metastases in other organs. It is accepted in medical research that, in breast cancer for example, tumour cells first of all enter the vascular system and then colonise the sentinel lymph nodes closest to the primary tumour. From there they travel along the lymph channels via further secondary lymph nodes and eventually find their way into the bloodstream. In a mouse model, PhD student Markus Brown from MedUni Vienna's Department of Pathology has now discovered another highly efficient and much faster route via which tumour cells already in the sentinel lymph nodes pass through their blood vessels to "invade" the vascular system, causing pulmonary metastases. The study has recently been published in the journal Science.


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    I’m not sure what you mean by different types? Like ER pos or TNBC

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    Science News

    from research organizations

    Breast cancer's spread routes mapped

    Date:
    February 27, 2018
    Source:
    Karolinska Institutet
    Summary:
    Breast cancer spreads to other organs in the body according to certain specific patterns. This has been shown by a team of researchers who have mapped breast cancer's spread routes in patients by studying the cancer cells' DNA.


    Breast cancer spreads to other organs in the body according to certain specific patterns. This has been shown by a team of researchers from Karolinska Institutet and KTH in Sweden and the University of Helsinki in Finland who have mapped breast cancer's spread routes in patients by studying the cancer cells' DNA. The study is published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. In Sweden, almost two thousand patients die of the disease every year. The fatalities are almost exclusively a consequence of tumours in the breast spreading to other organs, such as the skeleton, the brain and the liver.

    Metastases in the axillary lymph nodes in the armpits are an important risk factor for breast cancer to spread to other organs. What was not known before is if these metastases are responsible for spreading cancer further to other organs or what routes the cancer cells take.

    In the new study, the researchers have looked at the DNA in cancer tissue from 20 patients with breast tumours and metastases in both their axillary lymph nodes and other organs. By means of a technique called next-generation sequencing they were able to map the relationship between the cancer cells in the breast and those in metastases in other organs. This enabled them to show the cancer's spread routes.

    The study showed that tumour cells are spread from the breast tumour to the axillary lymph nodes and to other organs such as the skeleton and the brain. Metastases then often spread from the first organ to other organs in the next stage.

    "Our most important finding, however, was that the metastases in the axillary lymph nodes do not seem to spread further to other organs, so even if these metastases can show how aggressive the cancer is, it is not they that cause the spread," says Johan Hartman, Associate Professor at Karolinska Institutet's Department of Oncology-Pathology and one of the researchers who led the study.

    They also found that in certain cases it is a matter of an early explosion of cancer cells from the breast tumour that simultaneously gives rise to metastases in several different organs. The researchers were also able to show that different regions of the breast tumours caused metastases in specific organs in the body.

    Together the team's findings can help doctors make clinical decisions on when, where and how many tissue samples should be taken to understand how serious the disease is and adapt the treatment in the best possible way.

    "The findings also confirm earlier research that shows cancer treatments needs to be adapted to the individual. We hope this will lead to better treatment of metastatic cancer in the future," Johan Hartman says.

    The study was led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in collaboration with researchers from KTH/SciLifeLab and the University of Helsinki. The research was funded through grants from, among others, the Märit and Hans Rausing Fund, the Swedish Cancer Society, and the Cancer Research Funds of Radiumhemmet.

    Story Source:

    Materials provided by Karolinska Institutet. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    This Sucks!

    Intratumor Heterogeneity of the Estrogen Receptor and the Long-term Risk of Fatal Breast Cancer

    Linda S Lindström Christina Yau Kamila Czene Carlie K Thompson Katherine A HoadleyLaura J van't Veer Ron Balassanian John W Bishop Philip M Carpenter Yunn-Yi Chen ... Show moreJNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, djx270, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djx270Published:

    19 January 2018

    (Long article, worth the read)

    https://academic.oup.com/jnci/advance-article/doi/...

    Exerpt

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, with an estimated 1 million new cases and more than 400 000 deaths annually worldwide (1). It is a diverse disease, both in the sense of the metastatic potential of the primary tumor and in time for metastasis to occur (2), occasionally spanning more than 20 years between primary tumor diagnosis and metastasis. Endocrine therapy is a cornerstone in the management of estrogen receptor–positive (ER) breast cancer and has improved patient survival considerably (3). However, approximately 50% of patients with ER-positive disease fail to respond to endocrine therapy, and approximately one out of four women with early-stage breast cancer will later develop distant metastatic disease (4,5).

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    A recent Stanford cancer study that cured 97 percent of mice from tumors has now moved on to soliciting human volunteers for a new cutting-edge medical trial.

    The trial is part of a gathering wave of research into immunotherapy, a type of treatment that fights cancer by using the body's immune system to attack tumors.

    "Getting the immune system to fight cancer is one of the most recent developments in cancer," Dr. Ronald Levy, a Stanford oncology professor who is leading the study, told SFGATE. "People need to know that this is in its early days and we are still looking for safety and looking to make this as good as it can be."

    The treatment is not a true vaccine that creates lasting immunity, but it does feature a vaccine-like injection carrying two immune stimulators that activate the immune system's T cells to eliminate tumors throughout the body.

  • Amelia01
    Amelia01 Member Posts: 178
    edited March 2018
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    Not wanting to appear stupid, but I'm having difficulty in the definition of "high intratumor heterogeneity of ER". Can anyone give me the executive summary of the article, please?

  • bluepearl
    bluepearl Member Posts: 133
    edited March 2018
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    Amelia01...not s stupid question at all. Means that diverse cells within a positive ER tumour. The opposite would be same tumour cells within ER positive tumour. One could have well differentiated cells mixed with moderate to well differentiated cells....whereas another could have ALL well differentiated cells etc.


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    That makes two of us wrenn! Happy

    So bluepearl, I am guessing well differentiated means Grade 3?


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited March 2018
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    You are right wrenn, I had it backwards. This from bco.org

    Grade is a "score" that tells you how different the cancer cells' appearance and growth patterns are from those of normal, healthy breast cells. Your pathology report will rate the cancer on a scale from 1 to 3:

    • Grade 1 or low grade (sometimes also called well differentiated): Grade 1 cancer cells look a little bit different from normal cells, and they grow in slow, well-organized patterns. Not that many cells are dividing to make new cancer cells.
    • Grade 2 or intermediate/moderate grade (moderately differentiated): Grade 2 cancer cells do not look like normal cells and are growing and dividing a little faster than normal.
    • Grade 3 or high grade (poorly differentiated): Grade 3 cells look very different from normal cells. They grow quickly in disorganized, irregular patterns, with many dividing to make new cancer cells.

    Having a low-grade cancer is an encouraging sign. But keep in mind that higher-grade cancers may be more vulnerable than low-grade cancers to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which work by targeting fast-dividing cells.

    Be careful not to confuse grade with stage, which is usually expressed as a number from 0 to 4 (often using Roman numerals I, II, III, IV). Stage is based on the size of the cancer and how far it has (or hasn't) spread beyond its original location within the breast.

  • notbrokenjustbent
    notbrokenjustbent Member Posts: 326
    edited March 2018
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    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/12/old-drug-alcoholism-finds-new-life-cancer-treatment Several articles on this can be found with a simple google search. Again the issue becomes about money since big Pham cannot make money on this patent protected cheap drug.

  • zarovka
    zarovka Member Posts: 2,959
    edited April 2018
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    Thank you. Enjoying the thread.

    It seems that they may have figured out a way to attack cancer that has become resistant to hormone therapy. something to watch.

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-01-potential-t...

    >Z<

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited April 2018
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    Oncology/Hematology > Breast Cancer

    Worse Survival in Breast Ca Patients with Low Muscle Mass

    CT scans reveal increased risk of death in one-third of nonmetastatic patients

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/br...


  • Dianarose
    Dianarose Member Posts: 1,951
    edited April 2018
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    Vry interesting study.

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited April 2018
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    All about enlarged Axillary Lymph Nodes


    https://doctorslounge.com/oncology/diagnosis/lymph...


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited April 2018
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  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited April 2018
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    Breast cancer survival linked to muscle mass finds study

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180409/Breast-...

    Researchers have found that women with breast cancer who have a low muscle mass are less likely to survive stage 2 and 3 cancers. The study titled, "Association of Muscle and Adiposity Measured by Computed Tomography with Survival in Patients with Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer," appears in the latest issue of the journal JAMA Oncology.

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited April 2018
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    Cancers may be detected at smaller size in breasts with implants, study reveals

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180329/Cancers...

    Breast augmentation with implants does not interfere with the ability to detect later breast cancers--in fact, cancers may be detected at a smaller size in breasts with implants, according to a study in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited April 2018
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    New insights into 100-year-old mystery open novel possibilities for breast cancer treatment

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180403/New-ins...

    New insights into how cancer cells fuel their growth are opening novel possibilities for cancer treatment. A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has identified a long sought after connection between how cancer cells use the sugar glucose to generate energy - the Warburg pathway - and cancer growth.

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited April 2018
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    Surgical Resection vs Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer Liver Metastases

    http://www.practiceupdate.com/c/66213/67/13/?elsca...

    • This case-matched analysis was designed to evaluate outcomes among patients with breast cancer metastatic to the liver who received systemic therapy alone or in combination with surgical resection. The resection group had a median survival (after matching) of 82 months vs 31 months, with 5-year survival rates of 69% vs 24%.
    • The study authors conclude that liver resection combined with systemic treatment may result in improved overall survival relative to systemic treatment alone for patients with breast cancer liver metastases.
  • KPW3
    KPW3 Member Posts: 127
    edited April 2018
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    I'm taking this article into my MO next time I see him! I couldn't get the full article, but I would think he can. I have a question on whether the patients ever had mets anywhere else prior to only having it in the liver (oligometastiases).

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited April 2018
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    KPW3 - good luck talking with your MO. Hope the article helps. I suspect the Pt's were Oligo. I had this conversation with my MO. She was in favor of my talking with interventional radiology or possibly surgeons about either ablation or resection *if* the stars aligned properly - small number of lesions, small in size, accessible location(s) and no mets elsewhere... at lest none to visceral tissue. My impression is that that is becoming the accepted standard for oligo to liver.... when all else aligns as described. I have seen other articles on the topic in the past and will keep an eye out for those/other articles and post links. good luck!

  • jpBCfree
    jpBCfree Member Posts: 72
    edited April 2018
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    FYI

    My breast cancer surgeon, Dr. Kristi Funk (who is amazing) has written a book called BREASTS: THE OWNER'S MANUAL which is a guide to reducing cancer risk, making treatment choices and optimizing outcomes. There is nothing like it out there. I've read a pre-release copy and it's brilliant-- so straightforward and practical-- I wish I had read this years ago and maybe I wouldn't need to be on this board! :0

    She offers a free download of one chapter on her website so you can see for yourself...I highly recommend for those of us going through this BC journey as well as cancer-free women to increase odds of staying that way. It's a great mom's day gift for women in your life.

    More info and pre-order here https://pinklotus.com/elements/breasts-the-owners-...

  • lisey
    lisey Member Posts: 300
    edited April 2018
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    jpBCfree, does she have any chapters on the benefits of going flat? I can't stand books which push reconstruction and only in passing list flat as a side note. It's like being flat is not on surgeon's radar at all. I'm fighting for equal coverage of an important and healthy choice.

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited April 2018
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    Protein keeps metastatic breast cancer cells dormant

    Research reveals one of the mechanisms that allows metastatic cells to leave a latent state

    Date:
    January 22, 2018
    Source:
    Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)
    Summary:
    A recent study has identified the genes involved in the latent asymptomatic state of breast cancer metastases. The work sheds light on the molecular basis underlying how the expression of certain genes facilitates the spread of metastatic lesions.


    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/1801...