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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 21, 2017 05:31AM - edited Nov 21, 2017 05:35AM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 12, 2020 01:04AM debbew wrote:

Cancer and Metabolic Disorders Linked with Testosterone Levels in Both Sexes, but with Differences

Additionally, they found that genetically higher testosterone levels increased the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and of prostate cancer in men. "MR analyses indicated that testosterone increases prostate cancer risk in men … We found evidence that testosterone increased the risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive but not ER-negative breast cancer … There was also evidence for a protective effect of SHBG [sex-hormone binding globulin] on risk of endometrial cancer in women, which was consistent across all models, but a risk-increasing effect of SHBG on ER [estrogen receptor]-negative breast cancer."

https://www.genengnews.com/news/cancer-and-metabolic-disorders-linked-with-testosterone-levels-in-both-sexes-but-with-differences/

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Feb 12, 2020 01:17AM marijen wrote:

I just don’t understand why it took them so long to figure out the testosterone thing. It’s included with the HRT treatment for menopause. At least what I was given.

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Feb 12, 2020 02:39PM santabarbarian wrote:

My TNBC was 90% AR+....

pCR after neoadjuvant chemo w/ integrative practices; Proton rads. Dx 7/13/2018, IDC, Left, 3cm, Stage IIB, Grade 3, ER-/PR-, HER2- (FISH) Chemotherapy 8/13/2018 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Surgery 12/27/2018 Lumpectomy: Left Radiation Therapy 2/11/2019 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes
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Feb 14, 2020 05:17PM Lumpie wrote:

Dark Chocolate Intake Acutely Enhances Neutrophil Count in Peripheral Venous Blood

Beside the well-established impact on decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (1), recent attention has been paid to the relationship between cocoa-containing foods and the immune system (2), showing that dark chocolate consumption enhances the systemic defense against bacterial (3) and viral (4) infections. Hence, the current study aimed at investigating the acute effect of dark chocolate intake on peripheral blood leukocytes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC58353...

Iran J Pathol. 2017 Summer; 12(3): 311–312.

PMCID: PMC5835384

PMID: 29531561

{Any excused for chocolate!}

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 14, 2020 05:29PM Lumpie wrote:

Add-On Keytruda Doubles pCR Rate in Early Breast Cancer Rate of complete response reached 60% in triple-negative cohort

Escalating preoperative systemic therapy with immunotherapy improved pathologic complete response (pCR) rates for women with high-risk early breast cancer, results of a phase II trial showed.

Among 240 women with stage II/III breast cancer and HER2-negative disease, those assigned to neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab (Keytruda) achieved a pCR rate of 44%, as compared with 17% for a control group on chemotherapy alone, reported Rita Nanda, MD, of the University of Chicago, and colleagues.

Patients with triple-negative disease in the so-called I-SPY2 trial had pCR rates of 60% with pembrolizumab, a PD-1-directed checkpoint inhibitor, and 22% without it. While those with hormone receptor (HR)-positive/HER2-negative disease had rates of 30% versus 13%, respectively, as described in JAMA Oncology.

https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/br...

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 14, 2020 07:39PM Lumpie wrote:

Q & A: How Corrupt Scientists Threaten Public Health David Michaels, a GW professor and former Obama administration official, talks about his new book and how manufactured studies harm consumers.

https://gwtoday.gwu.edu/q-how-corrupt-scientists-t...

{This is more about public health than cancer specifically, but it is interesting - and troubling in an environment in which many are uncertain about what science to trust.}

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 14, 2020 07:40PM Kimchee wrote:

Anybody out there go back to your old treatments and if so did you get positive results ?

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Feb 14, 2020 07:47PM - edited Feb 14, 2020 07:47PM by Lumpie

Kimchee,

I repeated taxotere after about 18 months. Worked like a charm. Got a near PCR (again). Taxanes seem to be very effective for my type of cancer: HER2+, hormone negative. I remained on H&P which worked for about 14 months.

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 14, 2020 07:51PM Kimchee wrote:

I'm Er+Pr+ Her2- was on piqray and stopped working , Dr. wants me to go back to old treatments . Thank you for your reply so fast . I'm so glad to have found this site .

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Feb 14, 2020 09:17PM leftfootforward wrote:

taxol worked for me after 7 years.

Dx 12/13/2010, IDC, 3cm, Stage IIIA, Grade 2, 1/16 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Dx 12/4/2012, IDC, Stage IV, 0/0 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+
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Feb 15, 2020 12:02PM Maaaki wrote:

Interesting data for those on CDK4-6 inhibitors. The authors investigated enzyme Thymidinkinase (unspecific tumour marker) and could predict the response (developing resistance or sensitivity).http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2020/01/14/1078-0432.CCR-19-3271.full-text.pdf

Dx 2013, DCIS/IDC, Right, 1cm, Stage 0, Grade 3, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 5/2017, Stage IV, metastasized to bone/liver, Grade 1, ER+/PR-, HER2- Surgery Mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone), Zoladex (goserelin) Chemotherapy Surgery Hormonal Therapy Aromasin (exemestane) Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Radiation Therapy External: Bone Targeted Therapy Kisqali Surgery
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Feb 15, 2020 07:09PM redhead403 wrote:

Hi Santabarbian, Ketrolac is a NSAID sometimes used during or after surgery. Not really anesthesia

Surgery 4/16/2019 Lumpectomy: Left Dx 9/9/2019, DCIS/IDC, Left, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 11/7/2019 Lymph node removal: Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Prophylactic ovary removal; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Radiation Therapy 1/6/2020 Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 15, 2020 09:41PM marijen wrote:

Strontium89 Now Available for Relief of Metastatic Bone Pain https://www.empr.com/home/news/strontium89-now-ava...

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Feb 16, 2020 12:12AM Karenfizedbo15 wrote:

nice to see you back Lumpie! But good that you had a break too

Surgery 9/8/2007 Lymph node removal: Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (right): Latissimus dorsi flap Dx 4/2018, IDC, Right, Stage IV, metastasized to lungs, 1/17 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2-
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Feb 16, 2020 11:32AM Rah2464 wrote:

Welcome back Lumpie and thanks for all you do!

Dx 5/23/2018, IDC, Left, 1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/4 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- (IHC) Surgery 6/27/2018 Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Hormonal Therapy 7/27/2018 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Feb 16, 2020 11:32PM Frmthahart wrote:

So good to see you back Lumpie! Thank you for this thread and all you do!!


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Feb 18, 2020 05:58PM Lumpie wrote:

Why biometrics are the future of patient care

"We have seen an increased investment in biometrics by our healthcare customers as a way to accurately identify people in their ecosystems, including patients and clinicians, maintain secure access to protected health information, and secure high-risk work flows such as electronic prescribing for controlled substances,"

...healthcare organizations are using biometric tools for two-factor or multi-factor identification and single sign-in for staff and patient identification.

"Some providers or patients may be concerned that the government will get access to their information....

it was important to develop on "elevator speech" for staff to explain to patients how the technology would be used and data would be stored.

"A lot of our staff training was educating them on how to speak to a patient about the technology....

https://www.medicaleconomics.com/news/why-biometri...

{Thanks for all the kind comments. I have had a lot going on and have had to put myself on an internet "diet." It's brutal!}

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 18, 2020 06:26PM Lumpie wrote:

De Novo Versus Recurrent HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer: Patient Characteristics, Treatment, and Survival from the SystHERs Registry

Limited data exist describing real-world treatment of de novo and recurrent HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The Systemic Therapies for HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Study (SystHERs) was a fully enrolled (2012-2016), observational, prospective registry of patients with HER2-positive MBC. Patients aged ≥18 years and ≤6 months from HER2-positive MBC diagnosis were treated and assessed per their physician's standard practice. The primary endpoint was to characterize treatment patterns by de novo versus recurrent MBC status, compared descriptively. Secondary endpoints included patient characteristics, progression-free and overall survival, and patient-reported outcomes.

Patients with de novo versus recurrent HER2-positive MBC exhibit different disease characteristics and survival durations, suggesting these groups have distinct outcomes.

Clinical trial identification number NCT01615068 (clinicaltrials.gov).

https://www.meta.org/papers/de-novo-versus-recurre...

DOI: 10.1634/theoncologist.2019-0446

https://theoncologist.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 18, 2020 06:31PM Lumpie wrote:

Antitumor Activity and Safety of Trastuzumab Deruxtecan in Patients With HER2-Low-Expressing Advanced Breast Cancer: Results From a Phase Ib Study

Trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd, formerly DS-8201a) is a novel human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted antibody drug conjugate (ADC) with a topoisomerase I inhibitor payload. A dose escalation and expansion phase I study evaluated the safety and activity of T-DXd in patients with advanced HER2-expressing/mutated solid tumors.

Here, results for T-DXd at the recommended doses for expansion (RDE) in patients with HER2-low (immunohistochemistry [IHC] 1+ or IHC 2+/in situ hybridization-) breast cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02564900) are reported.

The novel HER2-targeted ADC, T-DXd, demonstrated promising preliminary antitumor activity in patients with HER2-low breast cancer. Most toxicities were GI or hematologic in nature. ILD (interstitial lung disease/pneumonitis) is an important identified risk and should be monitored closely and proactively managed.

https://www.meta.org/papers/antitumor-activity-and...

DOI: 10.1200/jco.19.02318

https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.19.02318


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 18, 2020 06:35PM Lumpie wrote:

Molecular heterogeneity in breast carcinoma cells with increased invasive capacities

Background Metastatic progression of breast cancer is still a challenge in clinical oncology. Therefore, an elucidation how carcinoma cells belonging to different breast cancer subtypes realize their metastatic capacities is needed. The aim of this study was to elucidate a similarity of activated molecular pathways underlying an enhancement of invasiveness of carcinoma cells belonging to different breast carcinoma subtypes.

Conclusions: We can conclude that hormone receptor-positive cells with increased invasiveness acquire the molecular characteristics of triple-negative breast cancer cells, whereas Her2-positive INV cells specifically changed their own molecular phenotype with very limited partaking in the involved pathways found in the MDA-MB-231-INV and T47D-INV cells. Since hormone receptor-positive invasive cells share their molecular properties with triple-negative breast cancer cells, we assume that these types of metastatic disease can be treated rather equally with an option to add anti-hormonal agents. In contrast, Her2-positive metastasis should be carefully evaluated for more effective therapeutic approaches which are distinct from the triple-negative and hormone-positive metastatic breast cancers.

https://www.meta.org/papers/molecular-heterogeneit...

DOI: 10.2478/raon-2020-0007

https://content.sciendo.com/view/journals/raon/ahe...


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 18, 2020 11:53PM marijen wrote:

GREELEY, Colo. (CBS4) – A team of scientists at the University of Northern Colorado believe venom from venomous snakes could carry the cure to cancer. Dr. Stephen Mackessy, professor at UNC's School of Biology, says studies show venoms in different snakes can attack human cancer cells in unique ways.

To conduct the study, Mackessy's students are given access to hundreds of snakes from around the world, all of which are stored in a secured facility on the campus of UNC. From rattlesnakes to vipers, the students are able to extract venom from each snake to study the compounds and proteins.

"These are compounds that have evolved to kill other animals, and kill things … in general, wreak havoc with living systems," Mackessy told CBS4's Dillon Thomas. "It turns out they are actually a very logical place to look for therapeutics."

Mackessy said that when sharing his studies with the public, many times people automatically think of the dangers venomous snakes come with. However, most don't consider the benefits the reptiles can offer to humans.

"People tend to have a visceral reaction to snakes in general," Mackessy said.

Snake venoms have been used since the 1950s to treat things like high blood pressure in millions of people around the globe. However, Mackessy said his lab is one of the first to research the possible uses of venom compounds to battle various forms of cancer.

"When you think about looking for a therapeutic drug, you don't turn first to something like a venom or toxin as a source," Mackessy said.

PhD candidate Tanner Harvey has specifically been researching viper venoms, some of which come from habitats as close as southern Arizona. Each venom, in different doses, reacts to cancers uniquely.

"(One viper venom) kills breast cancer really quickly at low doses. And, it kills colon cancer at low doses. But, it doesn't kill melanoma," Harvey said.

However, other venoms strongly react to melanoma.

Killing the cancer with venom isn't hard. It's not killing the patient at the same time that's the challenge. The team at UNC said their challenge is finding which compounds can be combined with other remedies to kill cancer efficiently, while preserving other life-dependent cells.

"(Finding the proper doses and mixes) is just like panning for gold," Harvey said.

The study is still in preliminary phases. Once the team feels they have a solid answer to which venom compounds are safe to battle cancer with, the research would press on to one day potentially meet clinical studies.

When asked if students at UNC were capable of finding the cure to cancers, Mackessy said they were well on their way toward that direction.

"There is no question they have the ability to make that kind of contribution," Mackessy said.

While Mackessy's team is working toward the goal of curing cancers, another takeaway from their research was also offered. Both Mackessy and Harvey hope their research will encourage the public to stop senselessly killing snakes simply out of fear. While both said they understood human instinct to fear a snake's ability to take life, they hoped the public would ultimately come to value the snake's ability to preserve life at the same time.

"You never really know what is going to come from a natural source, even something like a rattlesnake," Mackessy said. "It may be, in fact, that these dangerous animals house in their venom something that one day may be lifesaving for you, or your family members."

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Feb 19, 2020 03:51AM 2019whatayear wrote:

that seems pretty logical taxol is derived from a plant - maybe future “chemo” could come from venom.

IDC 2 cm micromets 1 node 8 more removed. BMX 6/24, A/C then Taxol 7/25, 25 rads 1/6/2020 No reconstruction BRCA2 - BSO 2/19 all clear/ starting AI on 3/1/2020
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Feb 19, 2020 06:37AM Lumpie wrote:

Using ctDNA to Predict Relapse in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer
Interview by
Farzanna S Haffizulla MD, FACP, FAMWA
Interview with
Ben Ho Park MD, PhD
So, we'd like to talk about circulating tumor DNA today. Can you tell us how reliable modern technology is in identifying ctDNA?
Can you tell me about then early-stage breast cancer and some challenges perhaps in identifying ctDNA in this patient population?
Do you think that we can look at circulating tumor DNA as a potential biomarker perhaps for early-stage breast cancer patients?
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/94149/56?elsca1=e...
{Interview addresses these and other questions. Video and transcription provided. Video is @ 3.5 minutes long. If log in is required, it is free.}
{Yikes... those snakes...! (in the post above)}
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 19, 2020 07:19AM Lumpie wrote:

Immune cell which kills most cancers discovered by accident by British scientists in major breakthrough

20 Jan 2020 The Telegraph

A new type of immune cell which kills most cancers has been discovered by accident by British scientists, in a finding which could herald a major breakthrough in treatment.

Researchers at Cardiff University were analysing blood from a bank in Wales, looking for immune cells that could fight bacteria, when they found an entirely new type of T-cell.

That new immune cell carries a never-before-seen receptor which acts like a grappling hook, latching on to most human cancers, while ignoring healthy cells.

"Our finding raises the prospect of a 'one-size-fits-all' cancer treatment, a single type of T-cell that could be capable of destroying many different types of cancers across the population. Previously nobody believed this could be possible."

The research was published in the journal Nature Immunology.

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/immune-cell-...


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 20, 2020 04:21PM Lumpie wrote:

Hippocampal Avoidance During Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Plus Memantine for Patients With Brain Metastases
Journal of Clinical Oncology
  • The authors of this phase III randomized trial studied hippocampal avoidance using intensity-modulated radiotherapy during whole-brain radiotherapy with memantine and compared that approach with WBRT with memantine in 518 randomly assigned patients with brain metastases. The most common primary sites of malignancy were breast and lung. The risk of cognitive function failure was significantly lower in the hippocampal-avoidance arm (aHR, 0.74; P = .02), and this was primarily due to less deterioration in executive function at 4 months and learning and memory at 6 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival or intracranial progression-free survival between the two groups.
  • These results support hippocampal avoidance as the standard of care in this patient population.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/96580/56?elsca1=e...
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32058845
doi: 10.1200/JCO.19.02767.
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 20, 2020 05:57PM debbew wrote:

Not surprising...

Higher case numbers correlated with better results in breast cancer surgery

[A study in Germany showed that] a positive correlation exists between the volume of services provided and the quality of treatment results in the surgical treatment of primary breast cancer: In hospitals with larger case numbers and with medical teams who perform many breast cancer operations, the overall survival chances are higher for breast cancer patients who underwent surgery. In addition, further surgery on the operated breast is less common.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20200219/Higher-case-numbers-correlated-with-better-results-in-breast-cancer-surgery.aspx

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Feb 20, 2020 06:00PM debbew wrote:

Also not surprising...

Certain factors linked with discontinuing breast cancer [anti-hormonal] therapy

In the study of 1,231 women who completed questionnaires, 59% reported at least one barrier to adhering to endocrine therapy. Three factors were identified as important: habit (challenges developing medication-taking behavior), tradeoffs (perceived side effects and medication safety concerns), and resource barriers (challenges related to cost or accessibility).

https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-02/w-cfl021920.php

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Feb 20, 2020 07:11PM Yogatyme wrote:

The article about ringing the bell was fascinating. It made me think that while cancer is sneaky, maybe the brain is tricky in how it processes all the treatment andthe associated events.

Yogatyme Surgery 3/2/2019 Prophylactic ovary removal Dx 7/19/2019, IDC: Papillary, Right, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 0/5 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 8/12/2019 Mastectomy: Left, Right
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Feb 20, 2020 07:12PM Lumpie wrote:

Shannen Doherty's Stage IV Breast Cancer — "Beverly Hills, 90210" star

In an ABC News interview, actress Shannen Doherty told Amy Robach (herself a breast cancer survivor) that her breast cancer has returned and that it is now stage IV. The 48-year-old actress is best known for her roles in the original "Beverly Hills, 90210" and "Charmed."

https://www.medpagetoday.com/blogs/celebritydiagno...

ABC interview:


{This is sad news. Perhaps a silver lining will be added attention to and awareness of MBC.)

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Feb 20, 2020 10:46PM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

marijen - loved those snake pictures!!! I wonder if some types of venom would be better than others. So would doses be givne in IVs or bites? Maybe a pill. And are they wearing protective gear when milking the snake.

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