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Topic: Breaking Research News from sources other than breastcancer.org

Forum: Clinical Trials, Research News, Podcasts, and Study Results —

Share your research articles, interpretations and experiences here. Let us know how these studies affect you and your decisions.

Posted on: Nov 20, 2017 09:31PM - edited Nov 20, 2017 09:35PM by Lumpie

Lumpie wrote:

I watch for research news on breast cancer, treatments, etc., and frequently see interesting articles. There is a topic on BCO called "Breaking Research News from Breastcancer.org." One of the moderators suggested that another topic might be appropriate for posting links and synopses of reports on research found elsewhere. So here it is! Please post links to reports on research form reliable sources. Thanks for sharing!

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jul 30, 2020 11:04AM BevJen wrote:

BlueGirlRedState,

Foundation One testing is genomic testing -- testing of the tumor and changes within the tumor (tumor cells can change during cancer evolution) -- not genetic (what you are born with) testing. I had trouble in 2016 getting my insurance to pick up genetic testing. Genomic testing, on the other hand, is FDA approved and I know that Medicare covers it -- that means that most insurance companies, that take their cues from Medicare, will cover as well.

Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole)
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Jul 30, 2020 12:07PM Hopeful82014 wrote:

This article is relevant for both early and advanced cancers, with some interesting info relevant specifically to tamoxifen users. This is only an abstract but if you follow the link to the publisher ("Nature") there's somewhat more info as well as an option to purchase the article itself for $8.99, which seems pretty reasonable to me, particularly compared to some fees for such articles.

"Fasting-Mimicking Diet and Hormone Therapy Induce Breast Cancer Regression"

https://www.practiceupdate.com/content/fasting-mimicking-diet-and-hormone-therapy-induce-breast-cancer-regression/103823/37/1/1

Dx IDC
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Jul 30, 2020 12:36PM moth wrote:

you can see the text for free here https://www.researchgate.net/publication/342967885_Fasting-mimicking_diet_and_hormone_therapy_induce_breast_cancer_regression

Feb 2020 - Stage IV, mets to lung, liver, mediastinal lymph. Dx at 50 in Dec 2017; Left, IDC, 1.7 cm, Stage I, Grade 3, 0/5 nodes, TNBC Surgery 12/12/2017 Lumpectomy: Left; Lymph node removal: Sentinel Chemotherapy 2/14/2018 AC + T (Taxol) Radiation Therapy 8/13/2018 Whole-breast: Breast Chemotherapy 3/18/2020 Taxol (paclitaxel) Immunotherapy 3/19/2020 Tecentriq (atezolizumab)
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Jul 30, 2020 01:01PM morrigan_2575 wrote:

BevJen - Thanks for that link. I find the vaccine studies fascinating and promising. Nothing better than out immune system to fight bad cells. We just have to teach the body to recognize Cancer cells as bad and attack them. 😃

Dx 1/20/2020, DCIS/IDC, Right, 4cm, Stage IIA, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 2/5/2020 Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 2/5/2020 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Targeted Therapy 2/5/2020 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Dx 6/19/2020, DCIS/IDC, Right, <1cm, Stage IA, Grade 2, 1/3 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ Surgery 6/19/2020 Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement Targeted Therapy 7/6/2020 Kadcyla (T-DM1, ado-trastuzumab) Radiation Therapy 8/10/2020 Whole-breast: Breast, Lymph nodes, Chest wall
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Jul 30, 2020 01:59PM Lumpie wrote:

Indigenous American Ancestry Tied to HER2+ Breast Cancer

Higher proportion of Indigenous American ancestry associated with a greater incidence of HER2+ breast cancer

HealthDay

TUESDAY, July 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Indigenous American (IA) origin could partly contribute to the higher incidence of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer in Latinas, according to a study recently published in Cancer Research.

Katie M. Marker, M.P.H., from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues evaluated genomewide genotype data for 1,312 patients participating in the Peruvian Genetics and Genomics of Breast Cancer Study to estimate genetic ancestry. The association between HER2 status and genetic ancestry was evaluated with findings replicated in 616 samples from Mexico and Colombia.

The researchers found that the odds of having a HER2+ tumor increased by a factor of 1.20 with every 10 percent increase in IA ancestry proportion. In samples from Mexico and Colombia, this association between HER2 status and IA ancestry was independently replicated.

"The positive association between Indigenous American genetic ancestry and HER2+ breast cancer suggests that the high incidence of HER2+ subtypes in Latinas might be due to population and subtype-specific genetic risk variants," the authors write.

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/104315/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert

https://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/80/9/1893

DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-19-3659 Published May 2020


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jul 30, 2020 02:23PM - edited Jul 30, 2020 02:25PM by Pi-Xi

Thank you, moth, for the Research Gate link to the article

Oncotype 12 Dx 4/7/2016, DCIS, Left, 2cm, Stage 0, Grade 1, ER+/PR+ Surgery 7/11/2016 Mastectomy: Left; Prophylactic mastectomy: Right; Reconstruction (left): Silicone implant; Reconstruction (right): Silicone implant Dx 8/3/2016, DCIS/IDC/IDC: Papillary, Left, 1cm, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2- Hormonal Therapy 9/1/2016 Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone)
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Jul 31, 2020 07:45AM Lumpie wrote:

Burden of Pre-, Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Up Worldwide

Countries with very high HDI have highest pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

HealthDay

TUESDAY, July 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There is evidence of an increasing burden of premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer worldwide, according to a study published in the August issue of The Lancet Global Health.

Emily Heer, from Alberta Health Services in Calgary, Canada, and colleagues conducted a population-based analysis of global breast cancer incidence and mortality among premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

The researchers found that in 2018, about 645,000 premenopausal and 1.4 million postmenopausal breast cancer cases were diagnosed worldwide; in each menopausal group, there were more than 130,000 and 490,000 deaths, respectively. Compared with higher-income countries, countries with a low United Nations Development Programme human development index (HDI) faced a greater burden of premenopausal breast cancer for both new cases and deaths. The highest premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence was seen for countries with a very high HDI (30.6 and 253.6 cases per 100,000, respectively), while the highest premenopausal and postmenopausal mortality was seen for countries with low and medium HDI (8.5 and 53.3 deaths per 100,000, respectively). Significantly increasing age-standardized incidence rates were seen for premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer in 20 and 24 of 44 populations, respectively. Growth exclusively at premenopausal ages mainly occurred in high-income countries, while in countries under transition, the increasing premenopausal breast cancer burden was most notable.

"Our study provides evidence of a rising burden of both premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer worldwide and wide inequities in breast cancer care," the authors write.

https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/104327/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(20)30215-1/fulltext

DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30215-1

Related editorial:

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(20)30307-7/fulltext

DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30307-7


"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jul 31, 2020 07:48AM Lumpie wrote:

Metastatic Breast Cancer and Pseudocirrhosis
ESMO open
  • In this retrospective study of 48 women with metastatic breast cancer to the liver, the authors analyzed patient characteristics and assessed the prevalence of complications associated with decompensated cirrhosis. There was a trend toward more patients with luminal cancer in this sample compared with the hospital cancer registry. Of these patients, 47 had widespread liver invasion and 28 had ascites, including 18 with ascites classified as transudate. Esophageal varices were observed in 11 patients, with 3 experiencing rupture. Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil were most frequently used at the time of liver contour abnormality appearance. Approximately half of the patients achieved a partial response.
  • These findings suggest that pseudocirrhosis develops at the expense of a substantial burden of liver disease and commonly with 5-fluorouracil, with or without cisplatin, and may follow treatment response.
Commentary by Lillie D Shockney RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG
A subset of metastatic breast cancer patients may manifest pseudocirrhosis; however, we would need to know if all radiologists report this finding. Radiologists commonly measure the increase in the size of known lesions in the liver or report new lesions; however, they might not be noting this additional anatomic finding.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/102317/67/13/?elsca1=emc_enews_weekinreview&elsca2=email&elsca3=practiceupdate_metastaticbreastcancer&elsca4=metastaticbreastcancer&elsca5=newsletter&rid=Mjg1NTQ4Mzc1MDQ3S0&lid=10332481
https://esmoopen.bmj.com/content/5/3/e000695
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/esmoopen-2020-000695

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jul 31, 2020 08:03AM Lumpie wrote:

JoynerL: Thanks for sharing that about checking your Foundation One test info from 2019. That is also really interesting that "this drug works most specifically to fusions rather than other modifications." I would not have realized that from what I read in the prior article.

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jul 31, 2020 08:40AM Lumpie wrote:

Independent Prognostic Factors and Treatment Modality Associated With Survival and Recurrence in Breast Cancer

JAMA Network Open

  • The authors of this study of 956 women with invasive breast cancer evaluated the independent prognostic performance of various clinical and molecular variables (age, tumor size, nodal status, high tumor grade, p53 status, estrogen receptor status, ERBB status) by specific treatment.
  • The performance of these factors was weighted by the specific treatment and outcome category.
https://www.practiceupdate.com/C/103451/56?elsca1=emc_enews_topic-alert
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2768090
Published: July 9, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.7213
{Kind of technical. If you like parsing this minutia, this may be of interest. Open access to article.}
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Jul 31, 2020 08:58AM BlueGirlRedState wrote:

BevJen - thank you for explanation.

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Jul 31, 2020 02:15PM Olma61 wrote:

Bev-Jen, thanks for that article. I guess that would be a one-shot treatment, wow, if effective, that is a game changer for HER-2. No more being tied to every-three-weeks-at-the-cancer-center.

10/30/2017 Xgeva for bone mets 5/31/2018 Taxol finished! "If one just keeps on walking, everything will be all right” - Kierkegaard Dx 8/3/2017, IDC, Right, 2cm, Stage IV, metastasized to bone, Grade 2, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (IHC) Targeted Therapy 10/28/2017 Perjeta (pertuzumab) Targeted Therapy 10/28/2017 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Chemotherapy 10/30/2017 Taxol (paclitaxel) Hormonal Therapy 5/14/2018 Arimidex (anastrozole) Radiation Therapy 5/30/2019 External: Bone
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Jul 31, 2020 02:52PM BevJen wrote:

Olma.

Yes, it sounds very interesting. Hopefully they will get good results from the trial.

Dx 11/2003, ILC, Left, Stage IIIC, ER+/PR+, HER2- Dx 6/2006, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to other, ER+ Dx 5/2019, ILC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER+/PR+, HER2- Surgery 7/5/2019 Targeted Therapy 8/1/2019 Ibrance (palbociclib) Surgery Lymph node removal: Left, Sentinel; Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy TAC Hormonal Therapy Faslodex (fulvestrant) Hormonal Therapy Tamoxifen pills (Nolvadex, Apo-Tamox, Tamofen, Tamone) Surgery Lymph node removal; Mastectomy; Reconstruction (left): Pedicled TRAM flap; Reconstruction (right): Pedicled TRAM flap Hormonal Therapy Femara (letrozole)
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Jul 31, 2020 05:31PM Hopeful82014 wrote:

Moth, thanks for the heads up on the Research Gate link. Your grateful neighbor to the south salutes you. :)

Dx IDC
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Aug 3, 2020 11:07AM Lumpie wrote:

Survival Outcomes by TP53 Mutation Status in Metastatic Breast Cancer

Purpose

To determine the significant genomic alterations in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and survival outcomes in common genotypes.

Patients and Methods

High-depth next-generation sequencing was performed for 202 genes in tumor and normal DNA from 257 patients with MBC, including 165 with estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor–positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 [hormone receptor positive (HR+)])–positive, 32 with HER2-positive, and 60 with triple-negative (estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor–negative and HER2-negative) disease. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed in the discovery set, in patients with breast cancer analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas, and in a separate cohort of 98 patients with MBC who underwent clinical genomic testing.

Results

Significantly mutated genes (SMGs) varied by histology and tumor subtype, but TP53 was an SMG in all three subtypes. The most SMGs in patients with HR+ cancer were PIK3CA (32%), TP53 (29%), GATA3 (15%), CDH1 (8%), MAP3K1 (8%), PTEN (5%), TGFBR2 (4%), AKT1 (4%), and MAP2K4 (4%). TP53 mutations were associated with shorter recurrence-free survival (P = .004), progression-free survival (P < .001), and overall survival (P = .003). Furthermore, TP53 status was prognostic among patients with HR+ cancer with PIK3CA mutations. TP53 mutations were associated with poorer overall survival in the 442 patients with HR+ breast cancer analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (P = .042) and in an independent set of 96 patients with HR+ MBC who underwent clinical sequencing (P < .001).

Conclusion

Significantly mutated genes (SMGs) differ by tumor subtype, but TP53 is significantly mutated in all three breast cancer subtypes. TP53 mutations are associated with poor prognosis in HR+ breast cancer and should be considered in the design and interpretation of precision oncology trials.

Other points of interest:

GATA3 alterations were mutually exclusive with TP53 alterations.

The authors concluded that HR+ tumors with TP53 mutations are mostly aromatase inhibitor resistant and would be more appropriately treated with other modalities. However, we do not know whether other regimens would be more effective for these tumors or whether TP53 mutations would equally confer resistance to other agents.

https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/PO.17.00245

DOI: 10.1200/PO.17.00245 JCO Precision Oncology - published online April 25, 2018

"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us." "If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad." "Buy the ticket, take the ride." Dx 2015, DCIS/IDC, Right, 3cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/1 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2+ (IHC) Chemotherapy 1/14/2016 Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxotere (docetaxel) Targeted Therapy 1/14/2016 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Dx 2017, IDC, Stage IV, metastasized to liver, ER-/PR-, HER2+ Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Surgery Lumpectomy: Right Radiation Therapy Whole-breast: Breast
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Aug 4, 2020 03:56AM - edited Aug 4, 2020 03:57AM by debbew

Four-stranded DNA structures found to play role in breast cancer

...These structures form in regions of DNA that are rich in one of its building blocks, guanine (G), when a single strand of the double-stranded DNA loops out and doubles back on itself, forming a four-stranded 'handle' in the genome. As a result, these structures are called G-quadruplexes...

During the process of DNA replication and cell division that occurs in cancer, large regions of the genome can be erroneously duplicated several times leading to so-called copy number aberrations (CNAs). The researchers found that G-quadruplexes are prevalent within these CNAs, particularly within genes and genetic regions that play an active role in transcription and hence in driving the tumour's growth.

..."The abundance and location of G-quadruplexes in these biopsies gives us a clue to their importance in cancer biology and to the heterogeneity of these breast cancers," added Dr Robert Hänsel-Hertsch who is now at the Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne, University of Cologne, and is first author on the publication.

"Importantly, it highlights another potential weak spot that we might use against the breast tumour to develop better treatments for our patients."

...By targeting the G-quadruplexes with synthetic molecules, it may be possible to prevent cells from replicating their DNA and so block cell division, halting the runaway cell proliferation at the root of cancer. The team identified two such molecules - one known as pyridostatin and a second compound, CX-5461, which has previously been tested in a phase I trial against BRCA2-deficient breast cancer.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-08/uoc-fds073120.php

Page 73 of 73 (2,176 results)