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  • Suzybelle
    Suzybelle Member Posts: 102
    edited July 2010
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    grdnslve, there is a sequel to Pride and Prejudice called Mr. Darcy Takes a Wife that was nothing but a bodice-ripper, although I read the whole thing...I am embarassed to say that!  I love J. Austen, but she would DIE if she read all the sex in that sequel.   It was like Oliver Twist porn, or something.  I couldn't get over it.  (But I didn't stop reading it, either.)

    Anyhoo, I'm almost done with the Stieg Larsson trilogy, which includes The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl who Played with Fire, and The Girl who Kicked the Hornet's Nest.  They are amazing.

  • iodine
    iodine Member Posts: 869
    edited July 2010
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    Reading Brad Meltzer's The Book of Fate and it's a page turner (especially at 2 AM when one just cannot get to sleep)

    Ordered a Charles Dicken's that I'd not heard of: Bombey and Son.(I am so sure that there are Many I've not heard of)  Only 769 pages of TINY printing.  I may go blind, or get a page magnifier.  LOL, will let you know if it's worth it. 

  • grdnslve
    grdnslve Member Posts: 42
    edited July 2010
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    suzybelle--hmmmm  a bodice ripper, huh.  guess i will pass on that one--thanks for the heads up!!

  • ktym
    ktym Member Posts: 673
    edited July 2010
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    Suzybelle, I'm on the last half of The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest.  You are so right the books are awesome.  Warning: you won't be able to put them down, read at some time when you have a lot of time to devote to reading. 

  • ginadmc
    ginadmc Member Posts: 183
    edited July 2010
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    I just finished "Island Beneath the Sea" by Isbel Allende. She is a wonderful storyteller and her books are impeccably researched. This follows a female slave in Haiti (while it was a French colony) to Cuba and then to New Orleans before the Louisiana Purchase. I found her story fascinating. The society, class and race aspects are interesting and the characters are unforgettable. As  you can tell, I really liked this book!  Gina
  • olisad
    olisad Member Posts: 5
    edited July 2010
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    Some ideas for you all. Enjoyed each one. And each so different. 

    Abraham LIncoln Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahme-Smith

    Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

    Naked by David Sedaris

    A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers

    The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

    In the Lake of the Woods by Tim O'Brien

    My Horizontal Life by Chelsea Handler (Not a literary giant but man did it make me laugh and laugh and laugh) 

    Loving Frank by Nancy Horan

    I Feel Bad About My Neck by Norah Efron 

  • candie1971
    candie1971 Member Posts: 2,467
    edited July 2010
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    I am reading Laura Bush's book. Wonderful reading.She is such a lady.

    BTW, I am not a George Bush fan...but Laura is magnificent!

  • AmyIsStrong
    AmyIsStrong Member Posts: 426
    edited July 2010
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    i went through this thread from the beginning and compiled a list to take to the library.  Unfortunately a LOT of the books were all checked out. But I did get a few.  Just finished The Servants Quarters which I really enjoyed.

    Thank you for all the suggestions. I will try to contribute, not just lurk and benefit from all of yours!

    Amy

  • grdnslve
    grdnslve Member Posts: 42
    edited July 2010
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    i know it has been mentioned before, but bears repeating-the guernsey literary and potatoe peal pie society - loved the format & the characters.  anytime i keep thinking about the people within the pages of a book long after i have finished it...well, that is a keeper. 

    these are old books, but i love them:

    nonfiction from her diary- a pioneers search for an ideal home, by phoebe judson

    green darkness by anya seton

  • ruthbru
    ruthbru Member Posts: 46,928
    edited July 2010
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    Loving Frank was very interesting and strange as it is based on the shocking true story of architect Frank Lloyd Wright and his lover........

    Loved I Feel Bad About My Neck!

  • msmpatty
    msmpatty Member Posts: 35
    edited July 2010
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    I just finished The Help by Kathryn Stockett.  Excellent novel about southern women and their maids during the early days of the civil rights movment.   I kept thinking "just one more page...", "just one more chapter..." and pretty much read it in two days.

    Thanks for all the suggestions ladies!

    Patty

  • AnneW
    AnneW Member Posts: 612
    edited July 2010
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    Just started THE LACUNA by Barbara Kingsolver. I cal already tell it's going to sweep me away!

    Anne

  • althea
    althea Member Posts: 506
    edited July 2010
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    I just finished The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan.  Cancer sure turned me into a reader of nonfiction!  I read his more recent book previously, In Defense of Food, and found it hugely informative yet easy to read.  So I was kind of surprised to find myself really slogging through the omnivore book.  But slog I did and I always like feeling a whole lot more informed and knowledgeable after reading Michael Pollan.  For anyone wanting to learn about the ways food gets to our tables, or our cupholders, Pollan is a good author to choose.
  • Neece
    Neece Member Posts: 18
    edited July 2010
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    Just wanted to report I had a happy few hours browsing the public library the other day and was so pleased to find several recommendations from this thread there! Like Patty and a few others I have a serious book buying habit but also use the Library a lot - and find the 2nd hand book exchanges great too - you can take in books oyu don't want any more and they give oyu credit towards ones from their store - I will often come out with 3 or 4 'new' books for about $15 or so.

    One I picked up at the Library and am just loving is 'Someone knows my name' - published as 'The book of negroes' in the US by lawrence Hill - it was a recommendation on this thread from way back. If you are interested in early Amercian history and particularly the experiences of those who came there as slaves it is an amazing read.

  • ebann
    ebann Member Posts: 1,474
    edited July 2010
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    I enjoy reading many books especially series:  

    the Yada Yada Prayer Group by Neta Jackson there are 7 in this series. (Yada Yada Prayer Group, Gets Down, Gets Real, Get's Tough, Gets Caught, Gets Rolling, & Gets Decked Out) Neta Jackson has started another Series as a spin off to this series. Yada Yada House of Hope. (Where Do I Go?, Who Do I Talk To?, & Who Do I Lean On?) so far

    Eve Duncan & Friends by Iris Johansen (Forensic Thriller) there are 15 so far & still reading LOL (Face of Deception, The Killing Game, The Search, Body of Lies, No One To Trust, Dead Aim, Fatal Tide, Blind Alley, Countdown, Killer Dreams, Stalemate,  Pandora's Daughter, Quicksand, Blood Game, & Eight Days To Live)

    Andy Carpenter Series by David Rosenfelt (Lawyer & his Dog) there are 10 so far (Open and Shut, First Degree, Bury The Lead, Sudden Death, Dead Center, Play Dead, Don't Tell A Soul, New Tricks &  Dog Tags)

    I am sure there are many more that I can come up with. I enjoy looking at this thread & reading what everyone has read & suggested. I like going to second hand bookstores, library & amazon. The series I do have my own set. I share them w/ a friend.

  • ruthbru
    ruthbru Member Posts: 46,928
    edited July 2010
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    grabbed a book that looked like a good summer read,"That Old Cape Magic: by Richard Russo

    turned out to be a little heavier; about families; how one's experiences as a child affect one's perspectives as an adult and how your past mixes in with your marriage relationship, parent/child relationships etc. it was pretty interesting and good

  • iodine
    iodine Member Posts: 869
    edited July 2010
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    Well, needless to say, I'm loving my "new" Dickens book Dombey and Son.  Amazing how people's ideas have changed and yet, remain the same over the decades, centuries.

  • msmpatty
    msmpatty Member Posts: 35
    edited July 2010
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    Hi Neece...what a coincidence... I too am reading Someone Knows My Name and loving it.  I'm imaging you reading it snuggled under a blanket, while I'm reading it by the pool.

    Patty

  • lovemyfamilysomuch
    lovemyfamilysomuch Member Posts: 762
    edited July 2010
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    I am reading "Beloved" by Toni Morrison.  Never read it when it came out.  Very powerful and moving!

  • msmpatty
    msmpatty Member Posts: 35
    edited July 2010
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    I'm about a third of the way through The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver.  It is excellent!   I usually avoid novels in which the story unfolds via diaries and letters, but this is a so well done I hardly notice the format.

    Patty

  • Sierra
    Sierra Member Posts: 180
    edited July 2010
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    I have just put my name down for:

    the Shallows

    and also:

    looking for the book

    The Bear's Embrace

    seems to be out of stock

    so many good books out there

    Sierra :)

    o/t  that Swedish author who has several

    books on the market now,

    actually I did not realize he had died

    at such a young age

    I believe he has a set of 3 books

    and has a move of one book to date

  • AmyIsStrong
    AmyIsStrong Member Posts: 426
    edited July 2010
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    I just finished The Middle Place, which was recommended here. I enjoyed it but would not have wanted to read it in the middle of treatment.  But now that I am done and looking backwards, I enjoyed it.

    Also read the Sweet Potato Queen book - too silly for me.

    Oh and I read The Servant's Quarters - also recommended here. Really enjoyed it.

    I'll have to find some titles to add.

  • AnneW
    AnneW Member Posts: 612
    edited July 2010
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    msmpatty, I can't seem to get past the half-way point of The Lacuna. I usually love Kingsolver's books. But it's slow going with the story where I stopped. Maybe I'll pick it back up late.

    Now I'm reading LOVING FRANK by Nancy Horan. Just started it, but I'm thinking Frank Lloyd Wright was a real piece of work...

    Anne

  • NatureGrrl
    NatureGrrl Member Posts: 681
    edited July 2010
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    I have a "don't read" warning, although of course some people may like it:  Her Fearful Symmetry, by Audrey Niffenegger. She also wrote The Time Traveler's Wife, which I haven't read but I understand is fairly good.  I won't go into all that's wrong with her second novel but a few of my thoughts include:  weak, disconnected, and mainly unsympathetic characters (including the totally self-absorbed and shallow young twins); boring, dull, and sometimes silly plot; and the last 1/4-1/3 of the book read like the author just wanted to get it over with.  I know I did.  I only kept going because I thought it would get better; there were some interesting ideas, but this book fell flat.

    One caveat if you are interested:  it's a lot about death, and I know there are times post-dx when the last thing I want to read for entertainment is anything that has death as a part of the main theme.

    I don't mean to offend anyone who reads this book and likes it, I chalk that up to personal preferences, but I can't help thinking many will find this a big disappointment.

    Hope to be happier with my next read! 

  • msmpatty
    msmpatty Member Posts: 35
    edited July 2010
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    Anne - I read several reviews of The Lacuna before I bought it and many had the same point of view as you do.   But I really like it and don't find it slow.    As for Loving Frank, he certainly is a piece of work.  I kept wondering what the point of that novel was as I was reading it.  The material seems so slim.  But the ending is a stunner.

     Patty

  • ruthbru
    ruthbru Member Posts: 46,928
    edited July 2010
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    Loving Frank is kind of shocking because the relationship described and what happened because of it are TRUE. Just the motivations are made up. I don't like him very much after reading the book & then googling for some more information about his personal life. Bluck! What a jerk!

  • msmpatty
    msmpatty Member Posts: 35
    edited July 2010
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    Ruth - I agree with you on Frank!   But what I still can't understand is why Mamah Cheny, who was so bright and independent, pretty much trashed her life for him.  Patty

  • ruthbru
    ruthbru Member Posts: 46,928
    edited July 2010
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    Did you read the end yet, Patty?

  • AnneW
    AnneW Member Posts: 612
    edited July 2010
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    Don't tell the end! I'm getting there!

    So many strong, smart women do stupid things with their lives because of men...

    Anne

  • ruthbru
    ruthbru Member Posts: 46,928
    edited July 2010
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    No, we won't tell the end......I don't think the book gives us much insight on WHY Mamah acted like she did. That would be a complaint that I would have with the author. I can't figure out her motivation. His, I can figure out, but better not say as this is not a Rated X site!