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Breaking Research News from sources other than Breastcancer.org

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  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited September 2022
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    New TROPiCS-02 Data in HR+/HER2- Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Demonstrates Progression-Free Survival Benefit of Trodelvy® Regardless of Their HER2 Status

    https://www.gilead.com/news-and-press/press-room/p...Wow!

  • nkb
    nkb Member Posts: 1,561
    edited September 2022
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    WOW indeed! so exciting! thanks for posting!

  • cp418
    cp418 Member Posts: 359
    edited September 2022
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/womens-health/breas...

    FDA receives reports of cancer linked to breast implants

    The agency has received 10 reports about squamous cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer, and 12 reports about various lymphomas related to breast implants.

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited September 2022
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    Antipsychotic use associated with elevated risk of breast cancer

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-09-antipsychot...

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,190
    edited September 2022
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    cp418 - would love to read the article about skin cancer & implants, but there is a firewall. If it's not too long, could you copy & paste? Or oops, maybe BCO won't work with that.. Urgh

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited September 2022
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    Could MS drugs help treat 'chemo brain'?

    Seems like this research is still very early stage, but at least the drugs they are considering are already approved.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/could-ms...

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited September 2022
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    Phase 2 Trial to Study Novel Drug in Pretreated Solid Tumors [including TNBC]

    ...The other will evaluate navicixizumab alone or in combination with paclitaxel for patients with triple-negative breast cancer who received between two and four standard lines of therapy for metastatic disease, including an immune checkpoint inhibitor or Trodelvy (sacituzumab govitecan)....

    Navicixizumab simultaneously targets inhibition of DLL4, a ligand of the Notch pathway, and VEGF, making this a very attractive therapeutic strategy to evaluate," Oberstein said.

    https://www.curetoday.com/view/phase-2-trial-to-st...


  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited September 2022
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    minustwo -- Here's the FDA presser announcing the "communication" (regarding Reports of Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Various Lymphomas in Capsule Around Implants):

    https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcement...

    and the actual FDA "communication":

    https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/safety-communi...


  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    Not research news, but some may be interested in this:

    Watch "Hidden Scars" with the directors

    Join directors and cancer survivors Kathleen "Casey" Clabby and Noel Storm to view their documentary, "Hidden Scars: Emotional Impact of Mastectomy and Cancer-Related Experiences," on Tuesday, September 20, 2022, at 6 p.m. (ET). The film explores the emotional impact of breast surgery both before and after the procedure. There will be time for discussion and an opportunity to learn about resources for support. This program is brought to you in partnership with Jefferson Health Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Unite for HER, and Living Beyond Breast Cancer. There are limited spots available, so please register as soon as possible.

    Register here:

    https://jefferson.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAsf-i...

    {Event appears to be free of charge.}

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    Texas Judge's Ruling Puts Free Preventive Care in Jeopardy

    This Wednesday, a federal judge in Texas ruled that parts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) requiring health insurance companies to cover specific preventive services and drugs at no cost to patients are unconstitutional. Judge Reed O'Connor previously challenged the ACA when he ruled in 2018 that the ACA was unconstitutional; however, the Supreme Court overturned the decision in 2021. In this latest ruling, Judge O'Connor found that ACA provisions relying on recommendations from the Preventive Services Task Force – a panel that decides which preventive care services must be covered under the law – were unconstitutional, as the task force's members are not appointed by the president or confirmed by the Senate. He also targeted the ACA's requirement that health plans cover HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, known as PrEP, at no cost, ruling that it violates religious freedom law.

    One of the plaintiffs, Steven Hotze, who has actively campaigned against the ACA and has referred to same-sex marriage as a "wicked, evil movement," claimed that providing coverage for PrEP burdened his religious freedom as he believed it facilitated and encouraged, "homosexual behavior, intravenous drug use, and sex outside of marriage." The plaintiffs also made a case against covering contraception, the HPV vaccine, and screenings and behavioral counseling for sexually transmitted diseases and drug use.

    Why it matters: Under the ACA, health plans must cover a number of preventive services, including cancer screenings and vaccines, at no cost to patients. The mandate has increased the use of preventive services and improved health outcomes through earlier detection and treatment. Despite O'Connor's ruling, requirements that insurers cover certain kids' services, reproductive services, and vaccines stand for now, but free preventive services under the ACA are still at risk. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has not yet said if it would appeal this decision, although it is believed that an appeal is forthcoming.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/07/us/politics/aca...

    {Write-up courtesy of NCCS. NYT generally allows access to a limited number of articles without charge each month. Further access may require a subscription or access via your library. Depending on local offerings, such access may be available on-line, remotely for library card holders. If you run into barriers, PM me.}

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    Estimation of the numbers of individuals living with metastatic cancer in the United States

    According to researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), as of 2018, more than 620,000 people in the US were living with metastatic breast, colorectal, prostate, lung, or bladder cancer or metastatic melanoma. Further, researchers expect that number to increase to nearly 700,000 by 2025.

    What they're saying: "Cancer survivorship often focuses on those who have completed treatment," said Emily Tonorezos, MD, MPH, director of NCI's Office of Cancer Survivorship. "But with over 620,000 metastatic cancer survivors in this country alone, these findings highlight the growing importance of identifying and addressing the needs of these survivors, who remain on treatment or who go on and off treatment."

    https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djac158

    {Write-up courtesy of NCCS. Free access to journal article.}

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    People with terminal cancer need to know they are dying. Doctors shouldn't withhold that information

    Dr. S. Monica Soni, MD, an internist and Associate Chief Medical Officer at New Century Health, reflects on the failings of the health care system in appropriately communicating to cancer patients their diagnosis and prognosis and involving them in decision-making regarding their care. In a study of individuals age 70 and older being treated for incurable cancer, 41% believed they had more than five years to live, while just 10% of their oncologists agreed. Nearly 60% believed their terminal cancer could go away and never return.

    What she's saying: "Physicians should be responsible for overcoming health literacy barriers, time constraints, and mistrust to ensure that their patients understand all available options. Anything outside of that is not informed consent. Before patients agree to chemotherapy riddled with unpleasant or harmful side effects, they should have a complete picture of what it will gain them in terms of months of life, quality of life, and symptom burden. For themselves, physicians are overwhelmingly likely to choose non-aggressive care at the end of their lives and up to one-third of oncologists wouldn't accept the chemotherapy they prescribe. This suggests a lot goes unsaid when physicians break bad news to patients about terminal cancer and other fatal diseases and offer next steps."

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/f...

    doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.0018

    {Write-up courtesy of NCCS and STAT News. Access to full journal article is without charge but may require registration at the site.}

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    Paid sick leave associated with lower mortality rates among US workers

    The US is one of the only developed countries in the world that does not have a national paid sick leave policy. Yet, new research shows the benefits these policies can have for Americans. The study revealed that areas where employers were required to provide paid sick leave had lower mortality rates among working age adults. Mandatory paid sick leave policies are associated with lower rates of suicide and homicide among men and lower homicide and alcohol-related mortality among women. Yet, the recent rise of preemption laws restricting lower governments' ability to enact mandatory paid sick leave policies poses a serious risk. From 2010 to 2017, preemption laws likely contributed to a 6% increase in mortality among working adults.

    The bottom line: "Lack of [paid sick leave] increases the odds of economic hardship and involuntary job loss for those who take time off to recover, which in turn can elevate the odds of suicide, drug use, and other risky behaviors. [Paid sick leave] can also produce positive spillover impacts on healthy workers by reducing exposure to sick colleagues," the study's authors wrote.

    https://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(22)00330-0/fulltext?utm_source=NCCS+Constituent+Database&utm_campaign=d18fc425d3-HCR_MC_Sept_9_22&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e96359f924-d18fc425d3-54826649&mc_cid=d18fc425d3&mc_eid=12d673e585

    DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2022.06.005

    {Write-up courtesy of NCCS and The Hill. Access to full journal article is free.}

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    Are No Eyebrows the New Eyebrows?

    After a decade ruled by big brows, some celebrities and trend setters are shaving and bleaching their caterpillars. The effect is both avant-garde and alien-like: 'I look like an egg.'

    The effects of chemo are now a fashion trend. Who knew? You heard it here first.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/doja-cat-eyebrows-kim...

    {Subscription required to access full article. But you don't really need that, do you? Winking}

  • nopink2019
    nopink2019 Member Posts: 384
    edited September 2022
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    lumpie - Love it! I texted several of my friends to show them what a trendsetter I am!

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    nopink2019: So glad you appreciated that. Not exactly academic, but I hoped people would get a chuckle out of it. (Why would you do that on purpose? No eyebrows, no eyelashes. I look like a fish! Loopy Ah, well.... )

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,190
    edited September 2022
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    debbe - thanks for the open link about implants and squamous cell cancer.

    Lumpie - GREAT batch of articles. Thanks.

  • emac877
    emac877 Member Posts: 688
    edited September 2022
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    Lumpie - Thank you for the info and the articles. As soon as Kylie Jenner did the no eyebrows look for the Met Gala I decided I was not going to worry as much about drawing on my eyebrows. LOL. Who knew we were all ahead of the trend?!

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited September 2022
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    Coping With a Deadly Prognosis

    It's not a research article and it's not even breast cancer, but this podcast (with a transcript option) may be of interest to those coping with a metastatic diagnosis.

    "The Doctor's Art" is a weekly podcast that explores what makes medicine meaningful, featuring profiles and stories from clinicians, patients, educators, leaders, and others working in healthcare.

    Hosts are Henry Bair and Tyler Johnson, MD. Guest is Katie Coleman who was diagnosed with metastatic oncocytoma, a rare type of kidney cancer when she was 29 years old. She talks about living with prognostic and therapeutic uncertainty.

    It is a rather long (@ 48 minutes) but IMO interesting and insightful interview about the uncertainty of living with a metastatic diagnosis, especially for those diagnosed at a young-ish age - but many aspects of the uncertainty apply to anyone living with a metastatic diagnosis.

    Listen at this link or Listen and subscribe on Apple, Spotify, Amazon, Google, Stitcher, and Podchaser.

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/podcasts/thedoctorsar...

    {No charge to access or listen but medpage and podcast sites may require registration.}

  • nkb
    nkb Member Posts: 1,561
    edited September 2022
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    Yes, I read this article on medpage and thought it was very interesting, I certainly spent way too much time worrying about prognosis and had to work hard at planning trips etc (I was worried I would screw up someone else's trip if I couldn't make it!) anyone can have an acute event that screws up plans, but, I don't think they worry about it as much.

    I really try mention to people to just surge ahead with their plans when they feel well (get travel insurance) but, I am grateful I didn't have to deal with this at her age and got to have children and a career before diagnosis.

    also an interesting commentary about how young people who worry about cancer (with symptoms and good reason) get dismissed due to their age alone.

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited September 2022
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    A patient with estrogen receptor positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer enrolled in the phase 2 ELAINE 1 trial demonstrated a durable complete response when treated with lasofoxifene.


    https://www.targetedonc.com/view/lasofoxifene-elic...


  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,471
    edited September 2022
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    Interesting, but looks extremely preliminary. Just one patient. I'd never heard of the ESR1 mutation and have no idea what it's significance is. Looks like this response occurred after 16 weeks? No mention of how many horrible side effects the person might have had to endure for those 16 weeks. No idea if the results would be lasting.

    I think it is great that people are posting these research results though, as it can give us all some hope and more to explore. On the other hand, I remember how a drug called ERSO? was all over the news (about the time the Covid vaccines came out) and it was presented as something that showed real promise for ER/PR+, although lengthy clinical trial were yet to happen. Turned out the whole thing went bust and the company (Bayer?) abandoned the whole project. Not sure why. Someone on these boards had commented that they thought Bayer put out all this press about this drug because they'd missed the boat with the Covid vaccines. This is all sketchy from memory and I don't know the particulars of all of this, but it does show how on the one hand we can all get hopeful from these early published results, but also how we can all get tortured and jerked around by them.

    I don't know what the answer is and I am in no way trying to discourage publishing (and posting here) early research results, but some of these studies are just so small and preliminary, and then never go anywhere. I'm surprised at all the research results I read that show some initial promise and then never get taken any further. Is it all about the money?

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited September 2022
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    Only one patient in the Elaine phase 2 study had the CR. In general, there seemed to be some benefit to lasofoxifene, but it didn't knock it out of the park. They discuss adverse side effects in the 2nd to last paragraph.

    ErSO has not yet been tested in humans. The announcement of the drug does seem over-hyped (animal studies can be promising but often don't pan out), but it was based in part on the novel approach. Bayer dropped their rights to the license, putting it back in the hands of Systems Oncology (the SO in ErSO) and the University of Illinois. They have been continuing to develop it, presumably trying to address concerns about toxicity, and they subsequently published a paper on ErSO-DFP which is supposedly less toxic, but apparently work remains to be done before it is ready for FDA approval for human studies.

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,471
    edited September 2022
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    Debbew - You are a wealth of knowledge about all of these studies - good for you. You are a real plus for all of us to have here.

    I have to say that I did only "skim" the article you posted, so didn't see the info about side effects. I just so often see news headlines about supposed big breakthroughs, and yet that "breakthrough" only turns out to give people another 2 or 3 months with all sorts of terrible side effects to go with it. I really wish they would present some of these results more "realistically" without the grand headlines. Getting people 2-3 more months, or getting even one CR as in this Elaine study isn't "nothing", and it's worth hearing about and looking at a bit further, but some of these developments are promoted in the headlines like huge things; almost "miracles" and they are far from it.

    I'm really glad that you are "on it" about these studies and sharing what you know with all of us. It is really helpful to have someone who understands them fairly well to be giving us some good info. Thanks!

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,190
    edited September 2022
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    Yes, thanks Debbie.

    And always thanks to Lumpie, who continues to make this thread such a valuable place to go.

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited October 2022
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    [Basic research in mice] Cancer cells 'hijack' a process used by healthy cells to spread around the body, research finds

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20220929/Cancer-...


  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited October 2022
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    [Basic research in mice] Altered fat cells may fuel breast cancer tumor growth

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/altered-...


  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited October 2022
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    [Basic research in mice] Unhealthy Gut May Set the Stage for Breast Cancer to Spread, Preclinical Research Reveals

    https://ascopost.com/news/september-2022/unhealthy...


  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,471
    edited October 2022
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    Debbew - Thanks as always for these references. I'd just seen references to the first two on ScienceDirect I think, but the 3rd one I hadn't and I think it is the most interesting. It would seem to make a case for all that probiotic sauerkraut and yogurt that I eat (smile).

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited October 2022
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    [preclinical research potentially leading to a trial] A new mechanism of drug resistance discovered for breast cancer

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-10-mechanism-d...