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Breaking Research News from sources other than Breastcancer.org

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  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
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    Modified form of doxorubicin ("the red devil") shows reduced toxicity (enabling greater effectiveness) in Phase 1 trial.

    https://avacta.com/successful-completion-of-fifth-dose-escalation-in-ava6000-phase-1-clinical-study/

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,347
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    This is wonderful thing to see for those coming down the road. So often these positive breakthroughs come too late for so many. This one also looks like it has quite a ways to go yet too, with later stage trials and all, before it will actually be available and helpful to people. This looks like it could be a very wonderful thing though, for those who stand to benefit down the road. Sure wish a much lower side effect version had been available when I was getting the "red devil".

    Debbew, as always, thanks so much for posting these new breakthroughs. The do give people some hope for sure!

  • lml_bco
    lml_bco Member Posts: 1
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    Any news on when Kisqali might be approved for early stage BC?

  • homemom
    homemom Member Posts: 830
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    I'm watching as more stage 4 drugs are being approved for early stages. I'm in my 9th year, and since I was considered early stage, I don't qualify to take these drugs like Verzenio. They say that it has to be treated in the beginning. I wonder what that means for me? I've made it this far, so I'm not likely to need it? Or its just not going to give me any added benefit. Feels like my timing was off or something LOL.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 924
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    Treatment is becoming much more personalized. As well as traditionally stage 4 drugs being used earlier to prevent recurrence the POLAR and ARTIC trials have shown that a genomic test can be used to predict which early stagers will benefit from radiation. It's good to see improvements coming for future patients even if it's too late for some of us to benefit.

    Homemom, in your case the advantage is with a stage 4 progression you would have more options than those who took a drug earlier. I don't imagine Verzenio would be prescribed again if you develop mbc after using it. Also, if you never need it (hopefully) you miss all the side effects that come with it.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 924
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    PPIs reduce Ibrance absorption causing shorter PFS.

    https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/breastcancer/105604?xid=nl_mpt_morningbreak2023-07-24&eun=g1812883d0r&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MorningBreak_072423&utm_term=NL_Gen_Int_Daily_News_Update_active

    I have experienced reduced absorption of vitamins and minerals (iron, D3, B12, magnesium) confirmed by blood tests and attributed to PPIs but I hadn't considered their effects on other medications. Right now slowing ILD progression trumps everything else for me but it looks like this is something to be considered for other oral medications.

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
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    City of Hope scientists develop targeted chemotherapy able to kill all solid tumors in preclinical research

    Researchers at City of Hope, one of the largest cancer research and treatment organizations in the United States, today published a new study explaining how they took a protein once thought to be too challenging for targeted therapy, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and developed a targeted chemotherapy that appears to annihilate all solid tumors in preclinical research. As the scientists continue to investigate the foundational mechanisms that make this cancer-stopping pill work in animal models, they note that there is an ongoing Phase 1 clinical trial testing the City of Hope-developed therapeutic in humans.

    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/city-of-hope-scientists-develop-targeted-chemotherapy-able-to-kill-all-solid-tumors-in-preclinical-research-301888576.html

  • homemom
    homemom Member Posts: 830
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    Wow, sounds like the most promising thing I've seen yet. If this could only allow women with ER+PR+ to essentially be done with worrying for 10-30+ years that the cancer will return, I'd be over the moon.

  • morrigan2575
    morrigan2575 Member Posts: 799
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    Interesting it's not specific to a BC type, at least if I'm reading the trial right. Hopefully the drug translates to humans, unfortunately that isn't always scene when moving from mice/animals to human

  • bsandra
    bsandra Member Posts: 1,007
    edited August 2023
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    Dear all,

    I recently stumbled upon this: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/city-of-hope-scientists-develop-targeted-chemotherapy-able-to-kill-all-solid-tumors-in-preclinical-research-301888576.html

    The respective clinical trial is here (8 participants only): https://classic.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05227326?titles=AOH1996&draw=2&rank=1

    Seems interesting, especially when they finally drug "undruggable" targets. CoH is a serious institution, so… waiting for results!

    Saulius

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
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    New treatment approach shows promise in reversing hormone resistance in breast cancer

    [Discussion of Phase I/II trial… also researching effectiveness with TNBC]

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20230809/New-treatment-approach-shows-promise-in-reversing-hormone-resistance-in-breast-cancer.aspx

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
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    Breast Cancer: Hope in Sight [well, years from now] for Improved Tamoxifen Therapy?

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/995805#vp_1

  • sas-schatzi
    sas-schatzi Member Posts: 15,879
    edited August 2023
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    @maggie15, saw your post about PPI's interfering with a cancer drug, and Vita/ electrolyte. Here's another reason to take PPI's only for short term. Chronic liver failure. PPI's are only supposed to be taken for 3 months. This article brings in and interlaces three concepts. 1st. description of the types of liver disease. 2nd it talks how PPI's alter the microbiome. 3. It talks about the impact of alcohol use and PPI's.
    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/blocking-stomach-acid-may-promote-chronic-liver-disease

    I did a look on Carvediolol and triamiicinolone to awhile back. Both drugs I have been on long term. Each has a neg impact on the liver, but not as near bad as the PPI's.

  • weninwi
    weninwi Member Posts: 753
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    maggie15,

    sas-schatzi mentioned a comment you made about Vita/electrolyte, but I couldn't find your comment. I just started adding an electrolyte product to my water (LMNT brand) and I'm interested in what you had to say.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 924
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    weninwei,

    I think sas-schatzi was referring to my list of vitamins and minerals that PPIs reduce absorption of (magnesium is an electrolyte.) I'm not a nutritionist but know something about electrolytes from my many years as a swimming competitor/coach.

    Electrolytes lost through sweating, vomiting, diarrhea and taking some drugs (ace inhibitors, corticosteroids, hormones, excess potassium/calcium, some cancer meds) cause metabolic imbalance. Replacing what is lost can prevent the sometimes serious SEs but consuming too many electrolytes can also cause dangerous problems. I would tell my young swimmers doing a 45 min workout at 7:00 am that they should drink plain water since they did not need the electrolytes that the older swimmers practicing for 2 hours did. However, it was recommended that they put electrolytes in their water at an outdoor meet on a hot summer day. My meds can cause big D so I use electrolytes as needed. The brand you mentioned is good in that it does not contain sugar. Using electrolytes is a balancing act.

  • weninwi
    weninwi Member Posts: 753
    edited August 2023
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    Maggie15,

    Thank you….good info. The mention of electrolyte replacement caught my eye because I just started Elacestrant (ORSEDU), a new oral hormone treatment, that can cause low sodium. I have labs (CMP & CBC) done monthly so will be able to follow my sodium. Drinking plenty of water to flush out killed cancer debris is also encouraged. I have reverse osmosis water drinking water in my home and there are internet articles about problems associated with drinking reverse osmosis water. Not sure how significant this may be if a person's diet is adequate in volume, well balanced in macro nutrients, and rich in vitamins and minerals. But I developed nutritional deficiencies (Vit D and Vit B12) while on Verzenio, that escaped awareness and attention for too long, so I'm more alert now. I have found oncology nutritionists only marginally helpful. Thanks again.

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
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    BriaCell Reports Benchmark-Beating Patient Survival and Clinical Benefit in Advanced Metastatic Breast Cancer

    • Median overall survival of 13.5 months [using Kaplan-Meier curve method] in BriaCell’s advanced metastatic breast cancer patients (vs. 6.7-9.8 months for similar patients reported in the literature)
    • 21 out of 29 patients treated since 2022 are still alive suggesting a strong survival benefit for BriaCell's combination regimen
    • No dose limiting toxicities to date

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/briacell-reports-benchmark-beating-patient-110000318.html

  • bsandra
    bsandra Member Posts: 1,007
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    A very interesting approach - detect and predict responses to HER2 therapy with specialized PET: https://scienmag.com/whole-body-pet-ct-predicts-response-to-her2-targeted-therapy-in-metastatic-breast-cancer-patients/

    Saulius

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
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    TransCode Therapeutics Announces Preliminary Clinical Results in First Patient in Phase 0 Clinical Study with Lead Therapeutic Candidate, TTX-MC138

    TransCode’s Chief Technology Officer, Zdravka Medarova, PhD, commented, “We believe these preliminary clinical data support our thesis that TTX-MC138 can be delivered successfully to metastatic lesions for the potential treatment of metastatic cancer. Preclinical evidence pointing towards miRNA-10b’s critical role in metastatic progression across a number of major cancer types suggests that inhibition of miRNA-10b in patients with advanced disease could have a dramatic impact on their disease.”

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/transcode-therapeutics-announces-preliminary-clinical-120000115.html

  • olma61
    olma61 Member Posts: 1,016
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    Frontline Pyrotinib Plus Herceptin and taxotere Improves PFS in HER2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer

    https://www.onclive.com/view/frontline-pyrotinib-plus-trastuzumab-and-docetaxel-improves-pfs-in-her2-metastatic-breast-cancer?utm_source=sfmc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=111423_OncLive_SEA-23-OSD1495_HER2%20Condition%20Center_Seagen&eKey=c2VhYnJlZXplMTZAaWNsb3VkLmNvbQ==

    “Pyrotinib is an irreversible dual pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor developed for the treatment of HER2-positive advanced solid tumours.”

  • bsandra
    bsandra Member Posts: 1,007
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    Dear Olma, thanks, wow, what an interesting combination - modified Cleopatra protocol that is more effective than Cleopatra itself (PFS 24 vs 18 months?). Hmm… Pyrotinib is Chinese, so it is interesting what results some other "local" TKI like Tucatinib would give? We know the famous HER2CLIMB with capecitabine instead but. It is interesting what was the rationale to select capecitabine as chemotherapy for HER2CLIMB, and not some other agent, like taxane, that are known to be very effective with anti HER2 therapies. Hmm…

    Saulius

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
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    Another step in the ErSO (then SERA-2, now renamed TEQ103) saga.

    Basically, the research group has found a new pharma partner to take their drug into clinical trials.

    https://www.thepharmaletter.com/article/oncoteq-in-licenses-a-promising-pre-clinical-breast-cancer-candidate

    https://www.igb.illinois.edu/article/unprecedented-compound-takes-step-toward-breast-cancer-clinical-trials

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,347
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    Debbew - As always, thank you.

  • weninwi
    weninwi Member Posts: 753
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    Debbew,

    Thank you for posting the article!

  • bsandra
    bsandra Member Posts: 1,007
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    Wow, a rebirth of ErSO? Interesting… Saulius

  • weninwi
    weninwi Member Posts: 753
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    Thoughts by Lillie Shockney RN, BS, HON-ONN CG regarding the importance of compassion in health care…specific to breast cancer.

    https://www.practiceupdate.com/c/158968/67/13/?elsca1=emc_enews_weekinreview&elsca2=email&elsca3=practiceupdate_metastaticbreastcancer&elsca4=metastaticbreastcancer&elsca5=newsletter&rid=NTkzOTg1MDA4NTg1S0&lid=20849614

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,347
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    Thanks for this Wendy. It struck a chord with me, because just the other day I was telling a friend how I think what I get is "treatment" not "care" (for the most part), and that sometimes I find it baffling that they always refer to "caring for me" and my "care" in general. I think of it pretty much only as my "treatment". As per this article, I think it is the compassion that is lacking. I understand it on one hand, caregiving burnout, etc., but at the same time, I feel it. I feel like I'm getting listened to, the next appropriate drug or whatever, but I don't generally get a sense that I'm "cared for". I remember when I was younger (18) and had my tonsils out, and then later in my late 20's, had my kids (c-sections), and at those times I seem to remember a lot more nice chatting from nurses, the "can I get you anything?" sort of things; pillow fluffing, getting the warm blankets, etc. I still get asked if I need anything and if they can get me a warm blanket, etc., but it seems to be hurried and lacking any real meaning on their part. It just seems rote and "procedural", not much more (with some exceptions of course). This article is good food for though and it's also well written.

  • weninwi
    weninwi Member Posts: 753
    edited December 2023
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    threetree,

    Well put…"treatment" not "care"….."rote" and "procedural". I know we've shared experiences on this issue in the past, so it was interesting to read a health care professional elaborate on the importance of compassion. When I have a good or exceptional experience with any of the many different health care professionals I come in contact with (doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner, scheduler, lab tech, scan tech, etc) I now try to make a point of saying something about how much I value the care they gave.

  • debbew
    debbew Member Posts: 237
    edited December 2023
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    Innovative treatment [TheraBionic P1, not for breast cancer but see below] uses radio frequency to target and reduce cancerous tumors

    https://today.wayne.edu/medicine/news/2023/11/15/innovative-treatment-uses-radio-frequency-to-target-and-reduce-cancerous-tumors-60465

    I first saw this described in a paywall article. Here's some excerpts from that article:

    "What they soon learned is each type of cancer they tested responded to its own set of radio frequencies. A specific set of frequencies seemed to affect breast cancer cells, another set for liver cancer, yet another distinct set for thyroid cancer, pancreatic cancer and ovarian cancer cells, too.

    The frequencies were always the same when you had a patient with breast cancer, whether they were young or old, had advanced or earlier disease," Pasche said. "We found a similarity in the frequencies, no matter the type of breast cancer — HER2, triple negative, ER/PR positive. ... To my surprise, indeed, because I trained as an oncologist and I thought we should see different frequencies based on type. We did not. They were very similar…"

    "Of the 28 patients tested in that first study, seven had stage 4 breast cancer and had run out of treatment options, Pasche said.

    "Two of the seven patients had an incredible response. The first one had a complete response," he explained. "She had metastases to the left femoral bone, metastases to the right adrenal gland, was suffering from pain and was on a high-dose of morphine. Within three weeks of starting treatment, the pain disappeared. She stopped taking the morphine and a PET scan showed a complete disappearance of the disease, which lasted 11 months… That was around 2005-2006." [why is it taking so long???]

    Here's the paywall link (Detroit Free Press):

    https://www.freep.com/story/news/health/2023/12/15/detroits-karmanos-institute-electromagnetic-liver-cancer-treatment/71808536007/

  • amel_83
    amel_83 Member Posts: 141
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    @debbew thank you very inyeresting.

    Also would be cheap and with no side effects...they should invest more on this