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Breaking Research News from sources other than Breastcancer.org

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  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited May 2018

    Researchers develop new method for early and accurate breast cancer screening

    The researchers were able to isolate relevant data to more accurately identify breast cancer biomarkers using two different electronic nose gas sensors for breath, along with gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to quantify substances found in urine.

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180425/Researc...

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Dark chocolate reduces inflammation


    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/1804...


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Breast cancer: Innovative pill may aid diagnosis

    Published Just now

    By Maria Cohut

    Fact checked by Tim Newman

    Many women with benign breast modules or slow-progressing cancer undergo needless procedures because current diagnostic methods cannot differentiate between harmful and benign tumors. An experimental new pill could change that.Could an experimental pill become the next best diagnostic tool for breast cancer?According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2014 alone — the latest year for which complete data are available — 236,968 women and 2,141 men in the United States received a breast cancer diagnosis.But, in many cases, it is difficult to distinguish between malign and benign tumors, or between fast-progressing forms of cancer and those that are so slow to develop that they will not severely affect someone during their lifetime.Moreover, dense breast tissue can sometimes get in the way of locating and diagnosing existing tumors, which may remain undetected for a long time.And, a lack of clarity when it comes to the initial diagnosis can lead health practitioners to refer patients for further procedures, which can be invasive and may be unnecessary. So what if there was a better, more accurate way of diagnosing breast cancer — one that would eliminate the stress and cost of treatments that may not even benefit the patient?Researchers from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor have now developed a pill that, once ingested, acts as a molecular imaging agent, allowing specialists to obtain more precise information on the location and type of tumors.Safer, more precise diagnostic tool"We overspend 4 billion [dollars] per year on the diagnosis and treatment of cancers that women would never die from," notes lead researcher Greg Thurber.But, he adds, "If we go to molecular imaging, we can see which tumors need to be treated."The research team has, so far, conducted an experimental study on mice that has yielded promising results. A detailed account of the scientists' findings has now been published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.The pill developed by Thurber and colleagues carries a special "dyeing" agent that marks tumors by responding to a molecule that is present in tumor cells, the blood vessels that fuel tumor growth, and inflamed tissue.This "dye" becomes visible under infrared light, which can easily penetrate and "scan" the body without exposing it to some of the risks inherent in X-ray exposure, such as DNA mutations.Once absorbed into the body, this marker not only reveals, with accuracy, where tumors are located, but also provides information about the type of tumor by rendering visible the different molecules found on the surface of tumor cells.This can help specialists to differentiate between malign and benign nodules, as well as assess the type of cancer tumor.Speaking of other benefits that an infrared dye-carrying pill would provide to patients, Thurber and team also note that it is a safer diagnostic tool than similar, injectable infrared dyes. That, they explain, is because some individuals can have severe adverse reactions to these injectable agents.A challenging taskWhile pills that deliver macromolecules to tumors have been developed by other research teams, these have eventually proved inefficient in clinical trials.Numerous challenges stand in the way of designing a medium that effectively bypasses the body's gateways to the bloodstream, to deliver chemical agents where they are needed.In the case of dye-carrying pills, the obstacles are particularly complex, as Thurber observes:"To get a molecule absorbed into the bloodstream, it needs to be small and greasy. But an imaging agent needs to be larger and water-soluble. So you need exact opposite properties."
    In fact, the current diagnostic pill "piggybacks" on the design of a cancer drug that did not make it through phase II clinical trials.While the therapeutic agent, unfortunately, did not prove effective, the composition of the pill was ideal for carrying macromolecules to the bloodstream, so they could "find their way" to any existing tumors."[The pill developed in the current study] is actually based on a failed drug," Thurber explains. "It binds to the target, but it doesn't do anything, which makes it perfect for imaging."In this proof-of-concept study, the researchers worked with a mouse model for breast cancer, and they were pleased to note that the pill worked as it was supposed to, delivering the infrared dye to the relevant tumor sites and marking the nodules.This means that the macromolecule contained in the pill was able to survive the acidic environment of the stomach; also, it was not "flushed out" by the liver, eventually allowing it to pass into the bloodstream and do its intended work.
  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited May 2018

    Marijen re Innovative pill may aid diagnosis: Interesting. I wonder how this is different from PET scanning. In reading about the topic, I realized I had never thought of it before.... but it's interesting that they don't use PET scanning at the initial diagnosis point to distinguish between benign and malignant early stage cancer. Seems like that is a tool that is already available. Thx.

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited May 2018

    More suspected cancer cases can {could} be identified early within primary care

    Considerably more cases of suspected cancer could today be identified early within primary care. Partly based on symptoms, but also statistics on the patients' visits to health centers, indicates research from Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden. "When patients seek care more frequently, as opposed to previously ....it could be a sign that something else is wrong, even if the symptoms can be initially interpreted as benign,"

    {Very interesting IMHO. Our bodies are telling us that something is wrong and we are seeking help. I know of too many instances in which patients, especially women, have been told it is all in their heads.}

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180427/More-su...

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Lumpie, IMO that's why they prescribe anti-depressants so heavily, because it's all in your head.

    SickTired

    Petscan, without looking it up. It measures the amount of sugar uptake hotspots, and by itself is not accurate, usually pared with a CT scan? Petscans are also the highest on the radiation scale. This pill seems to be a great thing once it's available.

  • Lumpie
    Lumpie Member Posts: 1,553
    edited May 2018

    'Rapid Autopsy' Programs Seek Clues To Cancer Within Hours Of Death

    https://khn.org/news/rapid-autopsy-programs-seek-c...

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Changes to Medicare Part D sacrifice medical progress for the benefit of insurance companies

    http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2018/05/01/changes-...


  • mike3121
    mike3121 Member Posts: 280
    edited May 2018

    I recently read an article about a dye made from neutralized scorpion poison. The dye created a purple color around the cancerous tumor and acted as a guide for surgeons to remove the cancer. I was wondering, why couldn't they piggyback some chemo of some sort onto the dye. If the dye can find the cancer, and only the cancer, then chemo could be delivered only to the cancer.

    Just some thoughts.

    The wife is doing fine on Xeloda (well, except for the usual H&F). Last PET/CT showed most spine mets gone and ones left are experencing tumor flare.

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Ki67 Heterogeneity in Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancers: Which Tumor Type Has the Most Heterogeneity?


    http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/106689...

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    I don’t know if this is true or not but it makes sense to me. I don’t feel good without protein...


    https://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/t-colin-campbell-protein-and-cancer/

    Are We Eating Too Much Protein? A Scientist Makes the Connection Between Protein and Cancer

    We're constantly bombarded with the message that we might die if we don't eat enough protein, but our country isn't sick or dying from protein deficiency- we're sick and dying from disease. Our protein intake as a country is also extremely high, with meat, dairy, eggs, toxic-filled whey protein powders, fish, pork, poultry, and highly-processed meat and cheese products ranking as some of the most popular in our culture today. And it's pretty easy, considering that the media promotes a high protein diet and a McDonald's is located on every corner. Then there's the supermarket where an abundance of processed lunch meats exist and over 30 varieties of cheese, with likely over 50 choosings of yogurt. Protein, protein, protein- it surrounds us everywhere we go. While protein intake is an important part of the human diet, perhaps we need to take a step back and assess the increase in animal protein in this country with with our increased rate of disease that goes along with it.

    The Man Behind The Plant-Based Anti-Cancer Movement

    Dr. T. Colin Campbell, author of The China Study, has spent 50 years researching the correlation between diet and cancer. He's dedicated his life to showing people how cancer prevention begins with what we put on our forks, and what we don't. Dr. Campbell recently gave a speech in Hawaii where he proposed that our high protein intake isn't just unnecessary, it's also a huge problem when it comes to increased cancer risks. Dr. Campbell (who actually grew up on a dairy farm) has spent limitless energy investigating and proving how a plant-based diet has the ability to prevent and even treat cancer. He's linked casein intake to multiple types of cancer, and meat consumption to prostate and colon cancer.

    But he hasn't stopped there. Regardless that Colin has faced extreme criticism from the medical world and the entire food industry, Colin hasn't backed down on his beliefs or his investment in research studies to get to the bottom of America's cancer problem. Dr. Campbell has been a long-time believer that a diet high in animal protein intake is a leading cause of cancer – and he's got the research to back it up.

    What Does the Research Say?

    Meat and dairy have specifically been linked to increased cancer risks, and giving up dairy is one of the best things a person can do to decrease their risks of developing cancer or experiencing cancer cell growth. In 1968, Campbell detailed a studied that was the first widely accepted study to be published regarding the intake of animal protein and increased cancer risk. Researchers found that the animals in the study who ate a diet made up of 20 percent protein had the strongest tumor growth rate, while animals only fed five percent protein had absolutely no tumor growth whatsoever. Over three weeks, animals were fed the same rates of protein and those who ate a diet of 20 percent experienced massive, fast tumor growth, while those who at only five percent protein still had no tumor growth whatsoever. For the last three weeks of the study, researchers removed protein from the animals' diet that were eating 20 percent protein and their tumor growths completely stopped.

    The unique part about the study was that an increase in plant-based proteins intake showed no increase in tumor growth rate. This is clear evidence that animal protein contributes to cancer and plant-based proteins do not. Colin concludes that increased protein consumption is like flipping the cancer switch on, while eating minimal amounts turns the switch back off.

    But Don't We Need Protein?

    While we do need protein, perhaps we don't need so much as we might think. The Center for Disease Control and Physician's Committee for Responsible Medicine both agree we are getting plenty of protein and that protein deficiency is not a problem in our society, especially in comparison to the cancer problem we have. The Physician's Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) even says that we actually get too much protein, around double of what we really need. They advise using the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) protein formula, which is : 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight for the average adult. To find out your average individual need, multiply your body weight in pounds by your recommended protein intake in grams.

    How to Plant-Based Proteins Play a Part?

    Plant-based proteins should be sourced, according to Dr. Campbell and to PCRM, from whole, plant-based foods such as leafy greens, vegetables, beans, legumes, nuts, seeds, and grains- not processed products or animal products. According to Dr. Campbell and to PCRM, eating a diet that includes a serving of legumes, greens, vegetables and grains at each meal, will provide plenty of protein, along with wholesome, plant-based nutrients.

    More on Dr. Campbell and Cancer Prevention

    Dr. Campbell has funded the nonprofit organization, T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies, based in Ithaca, NY at Cornell University, which provides comprehensive education for individuals interested in plant-based nutrition. The school offers a Certificate in Plant Based Nutrition and has become a nationally-recognized nutrition education program. Campbell also has a documentary coming out called Plant Pure Nation, due in early 2015, which will be produced by his son, Nelson Campbell.

    "Diet can be used to prevent and reverse cancer just like it prevents and reverses heart disease," said Dr. Campbell. "A diet high in animal protein increases the amount of carcinogens going to the cells. It increases the enzyme MFO (mixed function oxidase) that causes increased carcinogenic activity."

    Image Source: Gage Skidmore/Flickr


  • zarovka
    zarovka Member Posts: 2,959
    edited May 2018

    Interesting follow up on previous article. Basically asprin keeps dormant cells from waking up.

    Cancer surgery can awaken tumor cells, but in mice a cheap pill stops metastasis

    Marijen - The WHO recommendation for protein intake is something like 60g per day. We're talking 2.5 ounces per day, including everything you might get from diary or legumes. It doesn't leave much room for meat, and meat has a whole lot of issues as well. I have a small piece of fish, occasionally.

    The research on this point is fairly deep and goes way beyond the high level article you quote above. The one piece I recall is that protein raises the levels of IGF-1 (Insulin-like growth factor). This well understood because IG-1 it is easy to measure in serum. IGF-1 drives the growth of many cancers.

    >Z<

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Hi Zarovka, I think you’re off on your protein calculations.. Yes I know about IGF -1. Here is a question for you. What do you suppose the reason is that 7 out of 8 women don’t get breast cancer? Do they really eat healthier than the one person that gets breast cancer? You are very smart and have so much knowledge, this is not a challenge.


    image











  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    From AARP.com Feb 23, 2018

    Stopping Aspirin Therapy

    Who knew? Getting off the aspirin you were taking to help prevent cardiovascular problems can give you a heart attack. According to a major study of more than 600,000 adults published in the medical journal Circulation last year, those who stopped taking low-dose aspirin daily were 37 percent more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than those who continued popping their daily pill. For all of the study participants, the risk spiked as soon as patients discontinued aspirin and didn't lessen over time. And for those with previous cardiovascular disease, the risk of getting off aspirin was described as "perilous."

  • zarovka
    zarovka Member Posts: 2,959
    edited May 2018

    Marijen - I do need to clarify ... When I said 60g (=2.5oz) I was talking about the actual grams of protein you get in a given amount of peanut butter, not the total amount of peanut butter. My numbers are pretty much correct. The WHO guidelines are ~60g and that's 2.11 ounces. That doesn't mean 2.11 ounces of peanut butter, though.

    All that said, I would not have expected that 3oz of beef has only 25g of protein. The amount of protein in peanut butter doesn't surprise me, but I kinda thought meat was mostly protein. Apparently not. Interesting chart. Thank you.

    7 out of 8 women don't get breast cancer because of a combination of genetics, luck and environmental factors or because they die of something else first (lack of luck?). We focus on the environmental factors like toxins, exercise and diet because it is the only thing we control. Sometimes it seems hopeless because genetics and luck persistently prevail, but sometimes it seems we can get an edge through lifestyle changes. I am both a control freak and an optimist, so I like to believe lifestyle (the thing I control) matters. Certainly there are epidemiological and other studies that show these things influence the outcome. They will never determine it, of course.

    >Z<



  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Z - I’m sorry I thought we were talking about 2.5 ounces of meat. Yes peanut butter is in the chart but just for comparison. I’m thinking I’ve been getting much more protein than I need, that changes today. Fitness pal is a good place to check protein grams and almost anything else.

    Thanks for your take on the 7 of 8 question. I see that you are NEAD from one treatment of Abraxane. That is amazing! Congratulations! I would think Mayo would want to do at least one more treatment for good measure? Good luck with the brain mets, you’re almost home free!

  • Amelia01
    Amelia01 Member Posts: 178
    edited May 2018

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-05/05/c_137156732.htm

    Stumbled across this.


    The China Study has been debunked for many reasons - as has the blood type diet.


    What is right for any individual is so individual. I would imagine that they body over the years adjusts for diet. So a lifelong vegetarian would have issues with meat proteins and someone who has always ingested meat could have issues with a plant based diet.

    I’ve been avoiding meat for the past 6 months but sometimes my body is just craving it - so I eat a hamburger. I do not digest anything well so I’m only eating heavy meats mid-day.

  • lisey
    lisey Member Posts: 300
    edited May 2018

    I have always avoided fruits and veggies (except oddly broccoli and Brussel sprouts which I crave).  I have that allergy where raw veggies like carrots and berries make my throat close up and have nut allergies as well.  Honestly, I'm a meat / pasta / potatoes kind of gal, always have been.  I'm fairly slender too.   My body just inherently knows what it needs.  I've never had a banana or cherry in my life... don't plan to now - I figure I'm eating what is right for my body - and I love protein - eggs & meat...  

    My husband never liked milk or pasta, but when we married, he ballooned up eating the food I make.  He's now gluten free and makes his own meals and is back to being slender and fit.  Almond milk would kill me, normal milk hurts him.

    I think if you are in tune with your body, it will lead to what it needs... 

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Amelia01, I don’t understand. You posted a study that has been debunked? Are there many persons with basal like breast cancer? I haven’t noticed a topic, will check.

    Lisey, very interesting on your dh ballooning up. Was his diet gluten dairy free before you were married? I agree our bodies tell us what we need and mine likes to guilt me when I don’t listen. Lately it says no to meat! And yes to chocolate. Have always s had cravngs for spinach and (duck) liverwurst.



  • heidihill
    heidihill Member Posts: 1,855
    edited May 2018

    Was about to post about the study on zoledronic acid and TNBC (basal-like breast cancer) but Amelia got to it first.

    Protein sources have IGF-1, leucine, methionine, glutamine, asparagine, and maybe more stuff which can drive cancer growth, plus protein can turn into glucose for a nice energy boosting dessert for cancer. But our bodies need protein and having our muscles and bones waste away is not going to add to our quality of life nor help strengthen our immune system. Actually one third of cancer patients die of cachexia. 

    Drinking baking soda to fight inflammation:

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180425093745.htm

    This is for autoimmune disease but inflammation can also drive cancer growth so I wonder if this strategy would work for us.

    Z, I was always prescribed large doses of NSAIDs after my surgeries and encouraged to take them through chemo as well. Glad to hear you are NEAD on Abraxane. Way to go!!! Hoping for a positive outcome on the brain story.

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    So this is sort off the subject but very important!

    9:33 MTLogin

    Watch TV

    CERVICAL CANCER

    1 day ago

    Cervical procedure to prevent cancer is causing complications

    By S. Nicole Lane | Healthline.com

    S. Nicole Lane began researching her symptoms online and realized she wasn't alone. (iStock)

    S. Nicole Lane shared her story with HealthLine.com.

    Five months ago, I received a phone call from my OB-GYN informing me I had abnormal cells on my cervix and that a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) would be necessary to remove the cells and prevent cervical cancer.

    I had gone in for a regular Pap, like I do every year, and was told that I needed a biopsy. When my results came back, my doctor told me they would need to use a low-voltage electrical current — a LEEP — to remove the abnormal cells from my cervix.

    The term "abnormal cells" originally shook me. I assumed these cells would eventually turn into cervical cancer, so I agreed to what I thought was a harmless and necessary procedure.

    After the procedure was performed I began experiencing complicated symptoms — an infection, weakness, and pelvic pain — all of which challenged my recovery time.

    I also became depressed. I felt an overwhelming numbness — not in my body, but in my mood and livelihood. Some days I struggled to even get out of bed.

    Concerned, I Googled my symptoms and discovered several forums and personal blog postswhere women detailed a variety of complications. On the other hand, more detailed medical information was hard to find.

    I continued digging and was shocked to learn that many "abnormal cells" may never lead to cancer. Instead, these so-called "abnormal" cells are similar to moles on your body and having them removed isn't always necessary.

    Cervical cancer is relatively rare, compared to other cancers. Approximately 0.6 percent of people will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in their lifetime.

    I began reaching out to other women who were experiencing similar symptoms to my own following a LEEP and I discovered many others who had been affected in different ways.

    Read the rest of the article here.

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Breast Cancer Prognosis May Be Worse If Diagnosis Follows 'Negative' Mammogram


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018
  • zarovka
    zarovka Member Posts: 2,959
    edited May 2018

    Marijen - what they are pitching is basically low dose metronomic dosing of chemotherapy. it's a really good idea. many people on this site and others doing well with low dose chemo over a long period. one lady on in spire has been moving, very very slowly, through low dose regimes for 7 years. you can google it and learn tons.

    i used to think it was a non-standard treatment that was hard to get and this may have been the case, but in fact it's become standard of care for stage IV. with a little discussion and prodding it's more or less what i am doing with my by the book local oncologist. it might be interesting to get a consultation with a group like that which pushes the envelope a bit more. they suggest vaguely they determine the agent based on genetics. they are supremely unclear on their super special method of matching treatment to patients, so i don't like that. But most likely MBC patients can get this type of treatment in a standard oncology practice.

    nice resource thanks.

    >Z<

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    You’re welcome Zarovka, thank you for your comments.

    Heidihill, I like your comments too. On inflammation - why we need to fight it: from www.envita.com.

    Envita is a very honest website. They go into detail on why we’re not getting the best treatments, including insurance companies, medicare, doctor education and more.

    ——————————————-

    Chronic Inflammation

    In Latin, the word "inflammation" means "I ignite, set alight" and like gasoline, that's exactly what it does to cancer. A microenvironment of chronic inflammation can increase the risk of cancer, bolster chemotherapy resistance and turn on oncogenes, genes that can turn cells into tumors.

    Inflammation can become chronic if the cause of the inflammation persists or certain control mechanisms in charge of shutting down the process fail. When these inflammatory responses become chronic, cell mutation and proliferation can result, often creating an environment that is conducive to the development of cancer. The so-called "perfect storm" is an extreme challenge that cancer patients face.


  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Common drug may help battle aggressive breast cancer

    Published Saturday 5 May 2018

    By Tim Newman

    Fact checked by Jasmin Collier

    Basal-like breast cancer affects women at a relatively young age and is challenging to treat. The discovery that a common drug for osteoporosis may halt its progress is welcome news.New research offers a potential avenue for the treatment of basal-like breast cancer.Basal-like breast cancer develops in younger women, and prognosis rates are the worst of any cancertype.Often caught at a late stage, the tumors are normally aggressive and spread quickly.Even when treatment is successful, basal-like breast cancer is more likely to recur and metastasize than other types.The reason why this type of cancer is so hard to treat is that the three major targets for therapy are not usually present. In these cases, it is referred to as triple-negative breast cancer.The vast majority of breast cancer drugs target estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or the hormone epidermal growth factor receptor 2. In about 10–20 percent of breast cancer cases, they are not present — but without them, most therapeutics have no teeth.New study-co author Prof. Chenfang Dong, from the Zhejiang University School of Medicine in Hangzhou, China, reiterates why research into this type of cancer is so pressing:"The highly aggressive nature and the absence of effective therapeutics for basal-like breast cancer make it a high priority to elucidate what determines its aggressiveness and identify potential therapeutic targets."Details of his latest study were published recently in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.
  • Sara536
    Sara536 Member Posts: 5,937
    edited May 2018

    I suspect that plenty of patients have been lowering dosages of prescribed medication for years (without telling their doctors). I know my mother did. She did not have cancer but she routinely chopped her various pills in half or quarters. Her doctors just didn’t seem to understand that it didn’t make sense to give a frail 93 year old the same amount as a young person weighing twice as much.

  • hopeful82014
    hopeful82014 Member Posts: 887
    edited May 2018

    This isn't research per se but is something that should concern ALL of us, whether in the US or otherwise, since there may be a ripple effect in terms of support for research, etc.

    Breast Cancer Info Scrubbed From Government Website

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/894784?src=WNL_infoc_180510_MSCPEDIT_TEMP2&uac=153476CT&impID=1627592&faf=1

  • zarovka
    zarovka Member Posts: 2,959
    edited May 2018

    Sara - I know that is true. Doesn't work with IV chemo unfortunately. However, we as always have the right to say no to treatment...

    Will be trying to negotiate my Abraxane dose down a bit going forward.

    Z

  • marijen
    marijen Member Posts: 2,181
    edited May 2018

    Thanks for posting "Breast Cancer Scrubbed from Government Website", Hopeful, wtf? That was over 5 months ago. Where's Joe Biden and the Moonshot?