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Middle Aged Memories

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  • elderberry
    elderberry Member Posts: 1,064
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    My favourite car was an 1981 Honda Civic station wagon (Hondamatic?) It had no clutch but you changed gears and it had a choke. It went everywhere, was a sure footed as a mountain goat and carried everything, including a full sized clothes washing machine in its box!! I got it second hand in the late 1990's. Mechanics loved it. You didn't need a computer to fix anything. When it was on its last legs my mechanic tried EVERY place he could think of to get a replacement part. He was sad. I was sad. Now I have a 2006 Nissan Sentra - and it seems to be working just fine. But I don't love it like I loved my Honda.

    Sometimes getting lost can be a blessing. I have discovered places and things I never would have had I had a GPS.

    I tried straightening my bangs with Dippity-Doo and tape. It didn't work. I have a cowlick that cannot be controlled. In the mid-60's I wanted that "flip" with just the ends turned up and a small teased crown. My hair just won't be teased. It knotted and lay down like a cringing cur.

    Even before my hair got even thinner (thank cancer drugs) , even when it as long - it was pretty much wash and go. By the time I got dressed it was mostly dry. I was happy with its parted in the middle,just to the shoulders, still looking like a flower child hairdo even when I was 50. When I see photos of friends and relatives with their frizzy bangs, poofy dos; huge padded shoulders sitting with me I am the only person NOT embarrassed by my hair looking at the photos now.

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,384
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    Oh wow, Elderberry, Dippity-Doo! I think I'd forgotten all about that. I also totally remember the hair style you were looking for. That was my ideal too, as it was with many others. Long and straight, parted down the middle. Flower Children indeed!

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,129
    edited March 20
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    Oh Maggie & Three Tree - we are all going to be in so much trouble when we finally have to upgrade our cars. I can't play tapes, but I can still play CDs. I totally agree about paper maps. I plan my route which is often much better than than Siri or ALexa or whoever talks from the cloud.

    Elderberry - sorry I didn't see your post. But you are obviously in our same group.

    My Dad taught all his children to change a tire & change the oil. Even with my 2003 car, there's just too much under the hood for me to be comfortable except for wind shield washer fluid and topping up the antifreeze or the brake reservoir.

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,129
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    Oh my - Dippity-Doo. I used to set my hair with that gel and huge brush rollers. AND sleep on them. I had a page boy for years and before I finally switched to a "flip".

  • elderberry
    elderberry Member Posts: 1,064
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    I had neither straight or curly hair - it was just sort of wavy in one place and straight in another. I just let it be. I stopped with anything other than shampoo in 1968 - the year I graduated. I moved on to adding conditioner and detanglers later.

    My DH has his favourite music on a flash drive and uses an USB port on his Outlander.

    There is an expression "Death by GPS" Stories of people who are on the road and the GPS says proceed "X yards/meters" and they keep on going right past a sign that says "STOP! BRIDGE WASHED OUT"

    I can't remember when/where I saw a sign once here that said "Do not rely on GPS" …it must have been some major road work or something

  • m0mmyof3
    m0mmyof3 Member Posts: 9,456
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    Hubby and I still carry a road atlas in our car in case the nav aid tries to confuse us.

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,129
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    NM - are you still monitoring this thread?

    I was thinking about Clorox the other night. In the past, I always did a Clorox load of wash every week - as did my Mother. It's been years since I've done that. In fact since my swimming pool was filled in - 1994 - and I had loads of towels. I do soak my dishcloth in Clorox in the kitchen sink every week, but I just put my one towel in with the "light" or "dark" load as appropriate.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 952
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    Many years ago I did a Clorox wash once a week but now it’s only used very occasionally if needed. I think the regular detergents work better now. I was a competitive swimmer and coached swimming for 45 years so the smell of chlorine is strangely comforting. Maybe that has contributed to my current pulmonary problems but I had awesome lung capacity so all that pool time did have some benefits.

  • m0mmyof3
    m0mmyof3 Member Posts: 9,456
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    I can’t use bleach. I break out in hives from it.

  • elimar
    elimar Member Posts: 5,883
    edited May 3
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    Clorox for laundry? Isn't that a novel idea! I always thought it was for reverse tie-dye, or to make Converse All-Stars 10 times cooler than usual.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 952
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    It's amazing how things come back. Teens now use Clorox to keep their sneakers (including Converse) spotless white.

  • elderberry
    elderberry Member Posts: 1,064
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    Thinking back to my childhood memories. I feel in some ways bad for the development of virtually seedless watermelon. Many happy memories of sitting on my or other's stairs and seeing who could spit their watermelon seeds the farthest

  • m0mmyof3
    m0mmyof3 Member Posts: 9,456
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    I remember homemade tie-dyed t-shirts

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 952
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    The high school swim team I coached made me a tie-dyed shirt in school colors (orange and black) so they could easily find me on deck during crowded meets. I looked like Halloween personified. There seem to be newer methods for tie-dying now but I haven't tried them.

  • m0mmyof3
    m0mmyof3 Member Posts: 9,456
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    Neither have I Maggie. The first time I ever did tie-dye t-shirts was at a Girl Scout day camp.

  • elderberry
    elderberry Member Posts: 1,064
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    Tie-dying — isn't that what eleastics are for? I helped tie-dye old pillow cases to make curtains for my friend's attic apartment. Yup - I am that old.

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,384
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    I tie-dyed my sheets in my parents' bathtub. I think it was when I was in Jr. High. Did a t-shirt too if I remember. RIT dye, do they even make it anymore?

  • m0mmyof3
    m0mmyof3 Member Posts: 9,456
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    I think I have seen it in stores still.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 952
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    It now just comes in liquid form rather than the powder that had to be dissolved.

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,384
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    That's interesting that it's still around and now in liquid form. I hadn't given it a second thought in decades. It sure was a lot of fun at the time, though.

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,129
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    Who remembers "Twenty Mule Team Borax"? Read in my newspaper today that it was an alternative to Clorox. Hmmmm.

    And quiz time…. What about "Use….the foaming cleanser…"

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 952
    edited May 23
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    Borax was definitely not an alternative to Clorox but it did get the Alabama red clay out of clothing.

    Minus, I’m glad you got your power back. Was it Ajax?

  • m0mmyof3
    m0mmyof3 Member Posts: 9,456
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    My mom and her mom used Borax. I use Baking Soda in the wash.

  • nativemainer
    nativemainer Member Posts: 7,825
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    Borax, castile soap, and washing soda makes great powder or liquid laundry soap! Except I could never get the liquid to come out just right. The consistency was uneven, to say the least.

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,384
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    I remember the Twenty Mule Team Borax adds on TV. If I remember, Ronald Reagan did them before he became a politician. Lol.

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,129
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    NM - HOORAY, you're back. I've been waiting for you to become accustomed to retirement and dip back into this thread!!!!

    Yup Maggie - it was Ajax. I still prefer that scrubbing powder over Dutch Cleanser (which my Mother used)

    threetree - I had to look it up, but you are correct - Reagan did advertise Borax. I was also surprised to see Borax is supposedly banned in the US.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 952
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    Borax is banned because it can irritate the skin, eyes and lungs if vapors are inhaled. And to think that we wore clothes and used towels washed in it.

    I didn't know that Reagan was the driver but I did like the mule team. When I finally rode a mule I was pleasantly surprised how well she went and how much more sensible than a horse she was.

    Does anyone remember Murphy's oil soap? My mother used it on floors. I used it rather than saddle soap to clean horse tack. I never brought it home from the barn, though.

  • minustwo
    minustwo Member Posts: 13,129
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    Maggie - I still have Murphy's Oil Soap on my shelf. I used it to clean all my wood cabinets after the kitchen ceiling was replaced a couple of years ago.

    But speaking of saddle soap - does anyone remember "saddle shoes"? I'm older than many of you, but it was definitely the only shoe to wear in the late 1950s.

  • maggie15
    maggie15 Member Posts: 952
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    Minus, I had saddle shoes for school. It was a pain because you needed two different colors of shoe polish for them. White is not a good color for shoes IMO, even for nurses.

  • threetree
    threetree Member Posts: 1,384
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    I was in Jr. High, maybe '65 - '68? (I'm more than middle aged now), and saddle shoes were just "it"! We wore them with knee socks - usually over nylons, as we still had to wear dresses every day back then. Saddle shoes and knee socks went with the skirts and sweaters and jumpers; not nice dressy dresses. Almost always the brown and tan ones, but occasionally the black and white.