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Jewish Warrior Sisters

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  • Jclc83
    Jclc83 Member Posts: 167
    edited April 2016
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    Hi all.

    Fried matzoh is my favorite and I make it all during the year. But for best flavor use schmaltz and onions Mmmm

  • Kendrasue
    Kendrasue Member Posts: 107
    edited April 2016
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    Yes, dear Jclc83, it's all about the schmaltz! xo

    Valerie

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    Hi...... r there any Breslovers here?

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,950
    edited September 2016
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    thereisnodespair,

    This thread has been fairly quiet for several months. I think we run a wide gamut of observance levels, but not sure if any are Breslov. Take care

  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited September 2016
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    Wide gamut of observance is correct--I'm quite Reform (married to a semi-lapsed Catholic, raised our son Reform, and for awhile he dated a Sunday School teacher at a Conservative shul) but was raised secular. IIRC, we have a Modern Orthodox BCO sister in Jerusalem. thereisnodespair, nice to see a Hasid represented here. And everything in between!

    I am still learning about the various Hasidic (and non-Hasidic Haredi) communities. I grew up in the Brownsville/E. Flatbush section of Brooklyn, bordering Crown Heights and the Lubavitcher community (which is the only Hasidic community here in Chicago). I know that Williamsburg is mostly Satmar and Skverer, and Borough Park mostly Bobover. My mom's side of my family emigrated from Borisov in Belarus--not sure how far that was from Bratslav. My dad's side was from Cracow, though my grandma moved to Vienna in her teens and married a fellow Gallitzianer at barely 17 before moving to the Lower East Side, where she gave birth to my dad when she was 18. After my husband I & married and moved to Seattle (and my grandma, to spend her final year in Miami Beach), my folks moved to Brooklyn's Midwood neighborhood, which had a large non-Hasid “Yeshivish" Haredi community. (Their next-door neighbor was a Yeshivish rabbi with ten kids--his wife and eldest daughter would wheel their respective baby carriages side-by-side down Avenue J).

    Weird that one year ago, we were about to start Rosh Hashonah (and I had just been diagnosed). I was able to attend only erev RH and Kol Nidre services: on the first day of RH, I had my breast surgeon appointment--that group was so popular that the next available consult was at the end of the month. And my lumpectomy was on Yom Kippur. Broke my fast after being wheeled out of the recovery room with--what else?--a mini-bagel & schmear with grape juice--and first a Shehechyanu for getting through it safely. The hospital is on Chicago's North Shore, after all (they actually have volunteers who bring "Shabbat kits," containing a pair of LED tea lights, grape juice and a challah roll, to inpatients--though I am not very observant, when I was recuperating the day after my knee replacement I had a strong desire to “make Shabbos").

    This year, the holidays come pretty late. It'll seem weird to walk outside from my lakefront Reform temple into darkness after breaking the fast on Yom Kippur--our temple usually wraps things up before full sunset. When I was a kid, starting at 12, I would fast from sundown to sundown. (We couldn't afford to join the Reform temple a mile away). After I married and we moved to Seattle, the Reform temple where we had free student High Holy Day tickets would finish the concluding service by 4:30, and it felt truly bizarre to have challah & wine with the sun still shining brightly. It was also weird to drive or take the bus there--even though I grew up mostly secular and we & nearly all our neighbors drove on Shabbos, it was considered a “shanda" to drive on Yom Tov, when everyone was observant. My dad bought tickets every year to an Orthodox shul a few blocks away, which had a women's gallery--we kids would wear our new scratchy wool suits & dresses in the early-autumn heat, and squirm while the men davened chaotically and the rabbi delivered his sermon entirely in Yiddish--the universal language of first-generation Jewish parents for discussing stuff they didn't want us kids to hear. Most of the time, we would mill about on the sidewalk and watch the IRT elevated trains rumble by, making sparks as they passed. My mom stayed home; Dad endured the entire day's services, despite having forgotten most of his Bar Mitzvah Hebrew aleph-bet. I grew up feeling Jewish observance was more like penitence, and never attended an actual Reform service (not even my male cousins' Bar Mitzvahs, just the receptions) until my first Rosh Hashonah as a new bride in Seattle. Before that, I had explored other belief systems, almost settling on UU--and the beauty and joy of a Reform service, much of it in English with a choir, was a pleasant shock. That settled it for me--I would remain Jewish, and my husband agreed we should raise our eventual kids as Jews too. (He didn't go to Catholic school, but traumatic memories of the ruler-wielding nuns at once-a-week CCD classes convinced him that we would not subject any child of ours to that).

    I'd love to hear our other Jewish warrior sisters' spiritual stories as well! We are quite diverse here.

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,950
    edited September 2016
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    Funny, that as an adult, I have learned more about the Hasidic/Haredi communities than I did growing up. As Sandy mentioned, Brooklyn was the Hasidic hub, but I was a Bronx girl. As many Hasidimdo not use the Internet, I'm not sure that they have any presence on BCO, but we're glad you've found us!

    Caryn

    PS: Sandy, who lives in Jerusalem?

  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited September 2016
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    I think Rima lives in Jerusalem. She was diagnosed about the same time as I was, andwas stage 1A but opted for chemo instead of getting OncotypeDX-tested. She joked that she already covered her hair all the time anyway, so she didn't need to buy a wig. Haven't heard from her in awhile.

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,950
    edited September 2016
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    For a moment I thought you you were referring to Leah, may she rest in peace. For many years, she was our resident sheitel expert. She had the best wig tips ever!

  • karen1956
    karen1956 Member Posts: 4,532
    edited September 2016
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    exbrngrl, I miss Leah every day. I thought of her so much when I was in Israel this past summer. I will be there again in the end of December to see my DD who is learning there for the year. It should probably be around Leah's first yarzheit. She was a good friend. I spent 2 different Shabbats with her and saw her every time I was in Israel.

    Thereisnodespair, where are you located? I'm in Denver and Shomer shabbat, shomer mitzvah and attend a Modern Orthodox synagogue. Would love to get to know you better.

    As the other gals have said, this is a very diverse group in regards to religious observance.

    Its hard to believe that RH is only 3 weeks away!! It will be the first RH without my youngest daughter in 18 years. She left last Sunday for Israel. My son might be here though so that will be nice. I have to get used to cooking for less people!!!

    Have a good week. Karen

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    Wow!!!!! I have been pretty silent on these forums - still kind of breathless until we get the oncotype results and decide on treatment.... but i was soooo happy to find this Jewish Warriors "lounge" !!

    Karen 1956 - hi! I am originally from Chicago but live in Jerusalem for many many years. I am a Breslover, from a Modern Orthodox background. Where is your daughter going to be during her time in Israel? How difficult is it for you that she is here?

    I love diversity, it makes so sense since Hashem created us each unique.... I would love to share our journeys, and especially through our "Jewishness".... our Rebbe, Rebbe Nachman of Breslov, teaches so much about happiness, and "there is no despair" etc. many many things that can be very very supportive and illuminating in general and especially when faced with challenge.

    Sandy - your story is amazing! especially about Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (can't believe they are almost here) - I am very concerned that I don't have to start treatment on these days!!!! That your surgery was on Yom Kippur is beyond amazing - you know the chassidim after Yom Kippur have a big festive meal and dance until the middle of the night - so certain that the Mericful G-d has forgiven us and signed us all in the Book of Life! So even though it must have seemed weird and maybe difficult that that was the day for your surgery - I think it can be a true note of hope and light that your surgery happened on the holiest day of the year!!!!

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,950
    edited September 2016
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    Karen,

    I miss Leah too. I may be the ex Bronx girl, but she was the ex Queens girl. We went to the same college, Queens College, CUNY and had many similarities with respect to our childhood.

    Nodespsir,

    I love the wildly happy singing and dancing of the Breslover men

  • karen1956
    karen1956 Member Posts: 4,532
    edited September 2016
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    Thereisnodespair.....I am thrilled that my daughter is learning in Israel for the year. She arrived on the 5th of this month, so a week ago. She is learning at MMY which is near Talpiot and Baka. She was in Israel 3 times during high school...with her school in grade 9 for 2 weeks and then after grade 10 and grade 11 for 6 weeks with a girls learning summer program, Michlelet through NCSY. She arrived in 2014 the day Operation Protective Edge started!!! When she landed in Israel last week, her text to me was "landed home". I miss her, but I'm so happy for her that she has this opportunity. I've been to Israel 6 times in the past 9 years....5 times since 2010. I was there for 5 1/2 weeks this past summer.

    Where are you at in Jerusalem?

    Keep us posted on your treatment and how you are doing.

    Xbrnxgrl, where you at Queens the same time as Leah? I wanted my daughter to look at Queens, but she said it is too difficult for an out of towner. She only applied to Stern (ouch it is pricey), but she may stay in Israel for University. I have friends whose kids went there.

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    exbrnxgrl you made me smile... those Breslever men dancing are truly amazing... they are very sincere and will do so much to bring joy and Rebbe Nachman's books to anyone....

    Karen - i live in Pisgat Zeev, which is on the north side of town. that is great that you are so for your daughter coming here! And that she came before the day the war began! My SIL fought in that war, and the one before it too.... You are always welcome to stay with us when you visit here - we have a big house and except for my youngest my DH and I are on our own.... truly - you are welcome!



  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited September 2016
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    therisnodespair, remember that it is a greater mitzvah to preserve life than it is to perform ritual observances--in fact, we are forbidden to fast if ill and are excused from any observances that would imperil our health. So treatment rather than shul during the High Holy Days is not a sin--it’s a mitzvah. My rabbi told me that I must not fast if I am feeling ill effects from ongoing treatment (except, of course, “going NPO” the night before surgery).

    I’m another CUNY grad--Brooklyn College, ‘71

  • pessa
    pessa Member Posts: 137
    edited September 2016
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    My older son just finished 2 1/2 years in the army as a lone soldier. He made Aliyah and is staying in Israel for now trying to figure out what he wants to do with his life. My younger son just finished a year at a yeshiva in the Old City and is now at home trying to figure out what he wants to do with his life. I visit whoever is in Israel about once a year. I am just trying to stay well (am dealing with lung cancer as well as breast cancer)

    There are a few Breslaver chassidim here in LA, but not many.

    Wishing everyone a good and HEALTHY year. May you be inscribed in the Book of Life

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    Pessa - praying Hashem give you health and strength.. until a couple of months ago I never even knew that a person could have two kinds of cancer in their body at the same time... the challenge you face does really sound beyond anything imaginable....

    That is amazing your son did the army service. My brother a"h also served as a lone soldier many many years ago. It is a totally amazing thing that this boys (and girls) come on their own and volunteer to serve in the IDF... something so beyond the "expected".... I wonder if he spent time on Kibbutz Beerot Yitzchak - a lot of the lone soldiers have that as their "home base" and my BIL runs the program for them... And your second son too was in yeshiva here! Which one? So your saying they are trying to figure out what they want to do with their lives - made me smile - truth is I just turned 61 and I too am trying to figure out "what I want to be when I grow up" lol

    Sandy thank you so very very much for that well-needed reminder that taking care of one's health is above everything else and is surely on its own a great mitzva!


  • rainnyc
    rainnyc Member Posts: 801
    edited September 2016
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    I'm also reform, based in New York City (Brooklyn, actually). I was interested to read your story, Sandy, as my BMX last year was on the day before Yom Kippur. Not only was I not fasting on doctor's orders, but the morning after surgery, while a nurse was taking my vitals, an orderly rushed into the room, speaking in Spanish and sounding very excited. She asked if we could turn on the TV, and there was the pope! I figured I would take my blessings wherever they came that day.

    Before that, the last time I'd been in the hospital was for my son's birth--also on Yom Kippur. Now that day, I fasted! Well, except for a few ice chips.

    I can't believe it's been almost a year since my surgery. Good health and fortitude to all....

  • Chloesmom
    Chloesmom Member Posts: 626
    edited September 2016
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    Here's my intro. Brought up Catholic in Boston but left the church at 16 Started conversion process in college and studied Hebrew there. Met my DH who was brought in Conservative in NJ. We started out at Highland Park Conservative in NJ. Then moved to rural PA for his work. Live outside of York PA.

    Only a Reform Temple here. Took us a one time to get used to the organ, but fell in love with the community here almost 30 years ago. There is a small Conservative congregation but no rabbi or school so we raised the girls Reform. They were very active in youth group etc. Have 2 girls. Our older daughter has a mood disorder and lives independently in Balto. Our younger one is doing her residency at St Barnabas in NY. She is gay and part of an active group of very spiritual women many very observant several finishing rabbinical school soon. Previously she lived in Phila and was part of a vibrant gay Jewish community. My husband has been president of JFS. He has been nothing but supportive and loving through my health challenge.

  • Ruthi
    Ruthi Member Posts: 3
    edited September 2016
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    Shalom everyone:

    I'd like to introduce myself. I've been recently diagnosed with DCIS and unfortunately know very little other than I know I'll have to have a mastectomy. (I'm meeting with my surgeon tomorrow.) My guess is that surgery will be before the New Year but I will probably not be able to participate much in the High Holy Days. I live in the U,S., northern California and am a reform Jew. I'm glad to have found this forum and especially this thread. I will be reading and participating more in the days to come.

    Ruthi

  • Chloesmom
    Chloesmom Member Posts: 626
    edited September 2016
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    Thinking of you Ruthi. This is the hardest time when you don't know what is happening next. It gets better later. Hugs!

    Susan

  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited September 2016
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    Hugs and prayers for you, Ruthi. Once you have a plan in place it’ll be easier to deal with--you will be focused more on “this is what we have to do” than on “what if....what’s next.” Bummer about probably needing a mastectomy rather than a lumpectomy, but that might also exempt you from radiation. And they don’t give chemo for pure DCIS.

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    Ruthi - we are all with you....

    How is everyone doing, so close to Rosh Hashanah?

  • karen1956
    karen1956 Member Posts: 4,532
    edited September 2016
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    no despair..haven't even started cooking or baking. Still trying to figure out my work schedule for the month of October to take 7 days off and still get my job done. I'll bake and cook the next 2 Sunday's. We are keeping it small and simple this year.

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    I have only just started. First time ever I think that we won't be having guests and have not been invited out... soits me and my husband and youngest son (19)... pretty strange feeling....

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 80
    edited September 2016
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    my husband and I don't have children and no family in Dallas. Sometime we are with friends and sometimes not. This year looks like not but our Temple always has a break the fast and we will go to services.

    I am in Florida now - arrived yesterday - to spends few days with my mom who will be 87 in November. She's in assisted living. I have had to cut back my visits due to flying and risk of LE as I had nodes removed both sides with my BMX 8 months ago which I hate. I was here in June and see a big decline which makes me sad but she is in good spirits.

    They have services and holiday meals as there is large Jewish population among the residents.

    I can cook but am not a baker and nothing even close to a Jewish bakery so I miss the desserts but I just found a gourmet store in NYC butbis online called the Fig and the Vine and they are like the Ben & Jerry's of halva with 28 kinds so I will be ordering some good stuff online this year.

    Our temple just completed a massive renovation and looks even more beautiful so looking forward to a good holiday. I can use it. It has not been the best of years between me and more seriously, no 30 year old nephew in NYC who has osteosarcoma. We long for a happy and healthy year for our family and to all. Thanks

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    Balthus

    enjoy your stay with your Mother,

    have the feeling that your words "We long for a happy and healthy year for our family and to all" is what we are all praying for, a "bit" overwhelmed at the things we have experienced in this last year....

    so may i "second" that sentiment to all the women here, can't imagine going through DX and approaching treatment without this site and all the wonderful women here!!!

  • karen1956
    karen1956 Member Posts: 4,532
    edited September 2016
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    This year we are not inviting company for RH and we are not accepting any invitations out, in fact we turned one down. Just too much going on. So it will just be my DH, me and my 27 year old son who will be here. My mother leaves nearby (I moved her here from S. FL 3 1/2 years ago, but she can't come due to mobility issues. That makes me sadder than having the kids grown up. So I won't be doing as much cooking as I normally do. I love baking!!! My DH is going to visit his mother right after YK and then to see our DD and SIL in Toronto for the first days of Sukkot. I will take invites out for lunch with friends. It is very strange not having Yom Tov without my youngest DD, but I'm thrilled for her to be in Israel. I guess I finally have to admit, that at 60, I am empty nesting!!! It is a challenge to learn to cook for 2!!!

    Wishing everyone a happy and healthy year. May 5777 bring only good health and good things to everyone.

  • aviva5675
    aviva5675 Member Posts: 836
    edited September 2016
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    welcome Ruthi! We have all been thru various stages and paths on this journey. I found for myself that this site and the big variety of topics gave me huge insight and knowledge as well as comfort as I went along. Please try and get more information from your Drs and from helpful articles here about your condition and various treatment methods. I was initially diagnosed with DCIS and had a lumpectomy. Of course, I do not know your situation but if you can arm yourself with as much info or questions as possible it will help you get thru the process.

  • Ruthi
    Ruthi Member Posts: 3
    edited September 2016
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    Thanks everyone for the good wishes. Looks like I get to start the New Year off in the hospital with surgery. Hope to be inscribed in the Book of Life.

    Smile

  • Ruthi
    Ruthi Member Posts: 3
    edited September 2016
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    Does anyone know if it is possible to freeze matzah balls? How do they taste after?