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Jewish Warrior Sisters

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  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    Ruthi - i've done it losts of times - they are just fine !!!

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited September 2016
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    B"H

    Ruthi i have done it a lot of times - it defrosts fine! no problem

  • karen1956
    karen1956 Member Posts: 4,532
    edited September 2016
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    I have frozen them in a pan and they are fine


  • karen1956
    karen1956 Member Posts: 4,532
    edited October 2016
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    K'siva V'chasima Tova! Wishing everyone a year filled with good health and all things good. May 5777 bring blessings to all.

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,950
    edited October 2016
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    Shana Tova to all. May your new year be sweet

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 80
    edited October 2016
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    A happy, healthy and sweet year to all

  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited October 2016
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    Shana Tova to everyone—sending you some virtual apples & honey, almonds & raisins.

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited October 2016
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    B:H

    Shana tova - all the best to all of you!!!

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,950
    edited October 2016
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    This proud grandma just had to post this. The baby is my 5 1/2 month old grandson.

    image

  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited October 2016
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    Anyone here going to fast on Yom Kippur? I know one is not supposed to fast if “ill” or “elderly;” but if we are under treatment (even hormonals) are we “ill” even if we feel okay? And how old is “elderly?"

  • exbrnxgrl
    exbrnxgrl Member Posts: 4,950
    edited October 2016
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    LOL! Elderly is definitely not what it was 50 years ago. At 60, I may be older but not elderly. As for fasting, I try to go as long as I can, but if I start to feel weak or sick, I stop

  • karen1956
    karen1956 Member Posts: 4,532
    edited October 2016
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    at 60, I surely don't consider myself elderly! As far as AIs, I didn't consider myself "i'll" when taking them and I endured numerous side effects.

    I think your decision to fast is a personal one between you and Hashem.






  • ABeautifulSunset
    ABeautifulSunset Member Posts: 600
    edited October 2016
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    I don't fast anymore. I decided that I already suffer enough. Plus, I get migraines when I don't eat. I do not feel guilty. I believe that I am exempt. But each person should make their own decision. If you are physically up to the fast, I dont see why you shouldn't.

    Shana Tova. May we all be written and sealed in the book of life.

  • Chloesmom
    Chloesmom Member Posts: 626
    edited October 2016
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    I will eat less as AIs are doing a job on my body. Going to try my bulletproof coffee but iced. Will blend it the day before Don't believe my Maker wants me to be ill. Want to be able to focus on praying.

    Will try to fast from things like interrupting or having the last word this week That's harder than going without food! Wishing you all a year of health!

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited October 2016
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    B"H

    CHloesmom sorry for my ignorance, could you plz further explain what you meant in these two matters? I will eat less as AIs are doing a job on my body. Going to try my bulletproof coffee but iced.

    I just started taking anastrozole and am quite addicted to coffee... so that's why i am asking...

  • pessa
    pessa Member Posts: 137
    edited October 2016
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    I switch to decaffeinated coffee and tea from Rosh Hashana until Yom Kippur. My fast is much easier and I don't get a headaches from caffeine withdrawal because it's done by the time YK comes

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited October 2016
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    B"H

    Wishing everyone here (and all of Israel) g'mar chatima tova!!!! May you all be at the start of a wonderful perfectly healthy, cancer-free, joyous and illuminating year! May you and yours be sealed in the Book of Life. Shana Tova!

  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited October 2016
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    You too, thereisnodespair!

    Pessa, for me caffeinated black coffee or espresso is medicinal—I have asthma, and it helps keep my lungs open with fewer side effects than a rescue inhaler (which I do use as a last resort). I noticed that according to a Chabad,org rabbi, if you must avoid fasting because of health reasons, you should eat & hydrate only as much as necessary—no more than a mouthful at a time, at least 9 min. apart, and only for sustenance & not enjoyment. I’ll see how I feel Wed. morning. Obviously, we BC patients (especially those of us with lymphedema) must stay hydrated, so I will take my meds with plenty of water.

  • YeuxDeux
    YeuxDeux Member Posts: 2
    edited October 2016
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    Walter wasn't even a real Jew but he culturally understood how us Jews roll. Certainly the Cohen brothers do! Maybe we can start a group called the Jewish Lebowski Cancer Achievers and raise awareness of how laughter helps healing by doing funny movie nights in our communities to raise the spirits of our sisters and brothers through the gift of joy.

    I'm an ashkenazic Jew and we unfortunately have a genetic predisposition for breast cancer - my father's mother died at 62 in 1969 of metastatic breast cancer and I have the same ugly genetic mutation to deal with as she did.

    Happy new year,

    Ilene Alizah (that's happiness in Hebrew)

  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited October 2016
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    B"HThank you ChiSandy! I have asked many rabbis and learned friends about this year's fasting - it was made clear (all said the same thing) that it is a mitzva to fast but it is also a mitzva to guard our lives - so that if because of illness we must eat and drink - that is the mitzva we are to keep and it is actually a sin not to.... since i am in the middle of radiation (well, not so much in the middle but getting there lol) the RO said i REALLY REALLY shouldn't fast.... and so i have been told just as you write Sandy - to drink and eat very very small amounts (40 millimeters of drink and 30 of food - the food is like the amount of 2 thirds of a hard-boiled egg) every nine minutes and you can lower it even to every two minutes if need be.

    Its really hard to imagine drinking on Yom Kippur - I have always fasted since a young child - and not spending the whole day in synagogue.... but this is G-d's WIll and so I must not be sad - only happy that there are medical treatments for this BC and therefore hope that each year will just be healthier and happier G-d WIlling

    Wherever we are, He Sees what is in our hearts.....

    Have a meaningful day and all the very best to all of you!!!!!

  • chisandy
    chisandy Member Posts: 11,385
    edited October 2016
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    A healthy person can survive for up to a week without food, but no more than a day or two without water. So especially if you’re undergoing radiation or chemo, you MUST stay hydrated or else you are violating the mitzvah of preserving life. No need to feel guilty for drinking water!

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 80
    edited October 2016
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    I will do the best I can. Have an easy fast my friends.

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 80
    edited October 2016
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    Seriously, Prayer Is Helping Me Fight Cancer — Here's Ho

    http://forward.com/scribe/351753/seriously-prayer-...

    Last week on Rosh HaShanah, I looked out at the sea of faces in synagogue and declared: "Today, I stand before you, my heart full of joy for having made it to this day. I am not cancer-free, but the medications I'm now taking are gentle, and are controlling the disease." The congregation erupted: Amen.

    During this autumn holiday season, Jews receive a formula for a fulfilling life: teshuva (repentance or returning to your best self)), tefilla (prayer), and tzedakah (charity). Many American Jews, I think, readily find meaning in the concepts of charity and repentance, but may be more baffled by the benefits of prayer — particularly those who aren't certain who or what might be listening, or especially those who believe that no one hears them. I myself can't always fully embrace faith, and the God I believe in is not one who controls the onset or delay of disease or sudden disaster.

    And yet, I want to advocate for tefillah, the power of prayer. It can be a critical resource for anyone facing a grave illness, or otherwise acquainted with the fragility of life.

    My own familiar world collapsed in the course of a few days. On the eve of 2015, hours before the year turned, we heard news that my sister-in-law Ali had run out of options. At the age of 46, the mother of two young boys, she had been valiantly struggling with ovarian cancer for two and a half years. Now oncologists predicted she only had three months left. She made it to the end of February. Three days later, on the afternoon of her funeral, I received confirmation of my own diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Already dazed by Ali's death, I found myself lost in a dark cloud. It cast a gloom over everything, making it impossible to see what lay beyond the step directly before me.

    Last year during the holidays, I sat in the pews in the balcony of my Upper West Side synagogue, scrawnier and weaker than I had been in my adult life. I was pleased to hide my arms in a sweater to conform to the laws of modesty; uncovered, they resembled putty stretched thin, sagging and wobbly on the underside. The words of the High Holy Days' supplication, Unetanah Tokef, cut me sharply: "Who will live and who will die? Who in their time, and who not in their time?"

    I lacked the stamina to stand for much of the service; I sobbed in a fit of sadness when my husband stood up for the Mourner's Kaddish to commemorate the little sister he'd lost. I was overwhelmed with aches and chills from chemo medications. I was overcome with gratitude for having made it to that day.

    In the past year and a half, prayers have eased my anxiety, connected me to friends and strangers, encouraged me to pause and appreciate spectacular sunsets, the wonder of my body's recovery, the magic of climbing Masada at dawn and the enchantment of standing in the midst of that barren desert with hundreds of Jews from around the world. I've written my own prayers, created a healing ceremony for the mikvah, the ritual bath, participated in a Psalm circle over the phone – in which friends read and analyzed hymns of healing for a few consecutive weeks. I signed up for a prayer exchange, and received a name – Rivka Chaya Bat Leah – whose physical and spiritual health I pray for every week as I light the Shabbat candles. I think of her, and I feel less alone. I think of her, and I'm reminded that some anonymous soul is thinking about me, praying for my well-being.

    On several instances I've also happened upon events that sent chills up my spine. One occurred when my rabbi, Lauren Grabelle Herrmann, accompanied me to a CT scan, and brought along some prayer books. We were reading together, when an older woman sitting in the tiny waiting room asked us if we happened to be reading Psalms. Upon hearing that yes we were, she proceeded to tell us that her husband was now getting a scan, and she was searching for a prayer for him. Oh and also, that she herself had ovarian cancer in 1989, and at the time, she'd found great solace in Psalm 116. Again she said, I don't know why you're here, but I want you to know that I had ovarian cancer in 1989. When she was out of earshot, the rabbi and I read Psalm 116. I cried. It reminded me of all I had undergone, all the many steps in treatment that could have failed, or created new obstacles, and yet I had survived, of how I was flourishing even as others like Ali did not. "Thou has delivered my soul from death, mine eyes from tears, and my feet from stumbling." After I left the facility that night, I wandered into the buzz of Midtown as the workday was ending, and I felt as drunk on life as the young people gathering in Bryant Park for a glass of wine. I felt protected by a stillness of spirit. I felt at once giddy at being alive and at peace.

    The views and opinions expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.

    The Forward's independent journalism depends on donations from readers like you.

  • Chloesmom
    Chloesmom Member Posts: 626
    edited October 2016
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    Bullet proof coffee. I am on a ketogenic diet as the chemo and AIs have made me gain lots of weight in my middle. This is a no carb diet and has helped me lose weight and regulate my blood sugar. I cant fast completely as get too shaky but just had the coffee on Yom Kippur to keep me stable. Butter in the coffee is a bit of a fad for some but my doctor daughter recommended it for my health. Dont want a heart attack after getting through BC!


    Okay, so it's pretty much like this. I take my coffee in a big mug in the morning, so I use a bit more than most. It's about 1 Tbsp each of coconut oil and good butter (any grass fed or other quality butter would be fine). It works best if the butter is softened first or, if you're a fridge person, cut it into little chunks first.

    Put the butter and oil into your vessel of choice, top off with hot coffee, and blend until frothy. I use a Bodum style milk frother, someuse an electric immersion blender. A small whisk would do in a pinch. Don't overfill the thing or you'll make a mess. You can blend into less coffee and add more after it's all melted if you need to.

  • Chloesmom
    Chloesmom Member Posts: 626
    edited October 2016
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    About the holidays. I have to say this was the richest time ever. Last year i was shaky and couldnt stand during the services. This time my heart was so full

    The gift of being given another year. I was walking my little dog yesterday reciting psalms. Have never felt so cherished and blessed. Cancer has made me slowdown and be reflective. Something positive out of all this struggle to find happiness and to be given a chance to try to find more time forn oved ones instead of work work work! Have pulled some books off the shelf that are speking to me. I Asked for Wonder by Heschel is my favorite. Wishing you all Wonder! Suz


  • thereisnodespair
    thereisnodespair Member Posts: 98
    edited October 2016
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    B"H

    Balthus, what an amazing profound article.. i actually wrote a long reply after Yom Kippur, but it is lost somewhere in cyperspace..... anyways, wanted you to know i loved it!

    Chloesmom - you too gave me much to think about.... the blessings of BC.... what we can gather from all of this and make into something that brings light and love and some understanding ....

    wanted to wish you all a beautiful Succot.... it is such a beautiful holiday.... and now.... thinking more about what is really important and really everlasting BSD....

    all my love! praying you are all doing well, all the women in this community.... hoping we can open and create something unique together....

  • Chloesmom
    Chloesmom Member Posts: 626
    edited December 2016
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    Just checking in to say hello and wish you all health

  • MLMSC
    MLMSC Member Posts: 31
    edited December 2016
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    Just posting to join this thread. Didn't know it existed. I"ll go back and read the past pages. While I am too late, will add that I did not fast on Yom Kippur. Also, I was in the middle of chemo and had low counts so I did not go to synagogue. That was the hardest part. I was able to watch a synagogue service that was steaming live.

    Best wishes for a fun Chanukah and a happy AND HEALTHY new year.

    M



  • pessa
    pessa Member Posts: 137
    edited December 2016
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    Happy Chanukah to all Good health in the new year!

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 80
    edited December 2016
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    happy hannukah and all the best in 2017 to everyone